Fenix HM61R ticking all the boxes?

kreisl

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I believe the HM65R ticks all the boxes.
ah you mean the HM65R instead of the HM61R, they're about the same weight i see. Yes compromises, that's why fenis released both models at the same time, one cannot have all advantages of either model in 1 single light. Good to have a fair choice. i never tested the HM65R because i knew what i wanted/preferred, so i chose the HM61R. Imho this model sets the new reference in the 1x18650 L-angled headlamp category. At home/indoors I use it as handheld flashlight all the time; and i wouldn't do so if the headband was a nietcore or olight or zebralight headband. And i really enjoy the fun headband clamping/unclamping, when i need handsfree operation. Sometimes while wearing the headlamp on the head for handsfree operation (walking, orientation, moving, working), i'd spontaneously unclamp the light to deploy it differently, e.g. because maybe i'd need/want lighting of an object from a different perspective/direction (and i might use the tailcap magnet too in that instance). And then i'd clamp the light back "on my head" and continue with "headlight".

Just beautiful. :kiss: (Of course, one can do such temporary clamping/unclamping with an Armytek Wizard Pro too)

147g total?!
i'm measuring 146g total (light+headband+battery), not sustainable for professional jogging haha. Yes the 2 internal magnets contribute to the weight. One could remove the tailcap magnet with the right kind of tool to uninstall the spring. The alu tailcap weighs ~11g. With the magnet uninstalled it would weigh ~3g, saving 8g (guesstimate doht quote me on that).

Soon i'll post pictures of my 2 units.
 
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n2mb_racing

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i'm measuring 146g total (light+headband+battery), not sustainable for professional jogging haha. Yes the 2 internal magnets contribute to the weight. One could remove the tailcap magnet with the right kind of tool to uninstall the spring. The alu tailcap weighs ~11g. With the magnet uninstalled it would weigh ~3g, saving 8g (guesstimate doht quote me on that).

Yeah. I'm currently running with the Zebralight H52 with a Vapcell INR14500 L10 1050mAh battery. It's 70 grams with band and battery. Very light! But, only runs an hour at full brightness (300 lm). Most of my night runs are about that length, so that's usually ok. But, around the house work I end up changing the battery quite a few times. But, I'm curious to try moving up to 500 or 600 lm for 2 hrs with a 18650 light... Especially high CRI, might help me to spot sticks and holes, to prevent tripping on them.
 

kreisl

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Zebralight H52 with a Vapcell INR14500 L10 1050mAh battery
H52.

SC52.

Talking of SC52 haha, have you studied:D my post on SC52's "missing" reverse polarity protection? The Vapcell is a flat-top battery and since it makes electrical contact in your SC52 unit, it could mean that your flashlight is not protected against reverse battery insertion. I might be wrong though, so just take my words as a warning. You could find out by taking exact measurements with a digital caliper. Feel free to post your comments on SC52 in that thread, you're welcome.

:thumbsup:

night running, sticks, holes, woah. long runtimes at 500lm are a tough ask from a runner's light which must be light-weight. Zebralight have the lightest headlamps. But i have no experience if even the lightest 18650 headlamps are really sustainable as a runner's light, in the long run no pun intended; of course, there are hardcore people around the world who do use 18650 headlamps like Wizard Pro or Zebralight for running: i believe i've seen geman forum threads on the topic but couldn't follow the argumentation sorry. personally, if i were a runner, i wouldn't run with a 18650 headlight, just my anti-preference thanks. Olight had a dedicated runner's light, the Olight HS2 (2017) and Olight Array (2019), but it was discontinued quickly within 2.0 years iirc, apparently not a sales success. Good luck on your search!
 
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n2mb_racing

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On a side note, have you studied:D my post on SC52's "missing" reverse polarity protection? The Vapcell is a flat-top battery and since it makes electrical contact in your SC52 unit, it could mean that your flashlight is not protected against reverse battery insertion. I might be wrong though, so just take my words as a warning. You could find out by taking exact measurements with a digital caliper. Feel free to post your comments on SC52 in that thread, you're welcome.

Good point. I'd better check my light. Seems likely to be missing reverse polarity protection since I've used unprotected UR14500P cells as well, both without a magnet.

Or just be really careful....
 

geepondy

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The HM61R seems to be advertised as an all around headlamp. I was looking at reviews online but do you think the beam profile is wide enough to make a good running headlamp? Fenix sure has a ton of headlamps with much overlap.
 

kreisl

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think the beam profile is wide enough to make a good running headlamp?
is the beam floody enough for running? I'm interesting in seeing the first 20 or 30 feet in front of me with good side illumination vs seeing 150 feet down the road. I like lights where the spill off is very smooth from the center, like the orange peel reflector look.
The beam is per definition floody and very wide because of the plastic collimator lens with frosted finish. The beam profile would be definitely wide enough for running purposes but i can't vouch for this Fenis model (or any other Fenix model) being suitable for jogging because of the weight and weight distribution. 146g on your head, and then all concentrated at the front, argh! The headband distributes the weight but nah .. imho "no 18650 headlamp is really recommendable for jogging" (©2020 kreisl), even though i never tried it, just my two cents as an opining couch potato haha. Fenix has/had an annoyingly vast selection of old/new headlamps, many of which were plasticky and light-weight (as headlamps should be) and similar in product properties, and i believe they have been trying to discontinue a good old portion. Yet afaik none of them was/is advertised as runner's light.

Short answer: while the beam profile is suitable, the total product itself is imho not suitable for running. But if you really live in a van down by the river, then i'd say that the HM61R should be the perfect personal allround lighting solution for such a living situation. It's a simple tidy neat product and therefore likable, unlike the fiddly complex mess of the Olight Array and Olight HS2 which would get on your nerves after a while. Keep it simple, stupid.

If your amazon shop allows you to buy, test, return at no hassle/cost, then you could consider this option. :grin2:
 
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geepondy

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Thanks for the insightful answer. I can see your point. For a running headlamp, the weight distribution would probably better if the battery pack was on the rear. I can see how a headlamp with a battery of that size and everything at the front, would be front heavy, more so then my HL26R.

The beam is per definition floody and very wide because of the plastic collimator lens with frosted finish. The beam profile would be definitely wide enough for running purposes but i can't vouch for this Fenis model (or any other Fenix model) being suitable for jogging because of the weight and weight distribution. 146g on your head, and then all concentrated at the front, argh! The headband distributes the weight but nah .. imho "no 18650 headlamp is really recommendable for jogging" (©2020 kreisl), even though i never tried it, just my two cents as an opining couch potato haha. Fenix has/had an annoyingly vast selection of old/new headlamps, many of which were plasticky and light-weight (as headlamps should be) and similar in product properties, and i believe they have been trying to discontinue a good old portion. Yet afaik none of them was/is advertised as runner's light.

Short answer: while the beam profile is suitable, the total product itself is imho not suitable for running. But if you really live in a van down by the river, then i'd say that the HM61R should be the perfect personal allround lighting solution for such a living situation. It's a simple tidy neat product and therefore likable, unlike the fiddly complex mess of the Olight Array and Olight HS2 which would get on your nerves after a while. Keep it simple, stupid.

If your amazon shop allows you to buy, test, return at no hassle/cost, then you could consider this option. :grin2:
 

McSpeed

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Yeah. I'm currently running with the Zebralight H52 with a Vapcell INR14500 L10 1050mAh battery. It's 70 grams with band and battery. Very light! But, only runs an hour at full brightness (300 lm). Most of my night runs are about that length, so that's usually ok. But, around the house work I end up changing the battery quite a few times. But, I'm curious to try moving up to 500 or 600 lm for 2 hrs with a 18650 light... Especially high CRI, might help me to spot sticks and holes, to prevent tripping on them.

I would give the Hm65r a try. I’ll take. little bit more weight for a lot more light and run time. I used to run a lot in the dark without a light until I broke my ankle tripping on a cable strung across a sidewalk.

The weight being in front is pretty comfortable. My last headlamp had the battery pack in back although it did not have the top strap like the Fenix and it tended to slide around more.

I’m not here to sell you on Fenix, just sharing what I have experienced. IMO the light is the most important factor and everything else falls lower in order of importance. Like I noted before, it is a series of compromises. If weight is important you can use a low lumen light with a small battery. I buy a light for LIGHT!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

3L3M3NT

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The HM61R seems to be advertised as an all around headlamp. I was looking at reviews online but do you think the beam profile is wide enough to make a good running headlamp? Fenix sure has a ton of headlamps with much overlap.

If you're worried about weight you could buy the HM61Rs little brother the HM51R.
https://www.blackcomb-shop.eu/en-US...P-JDS2vVRP0zkpjFH-gBkPgaAu4hEALw_wcB#one-size

The beam is per definition floody and very wide because of the plastic collimator lens with frosted finish. The beam profile would be definitely wide enough for running purposes but i can't vouch for this Fenis model (or any other Fenix model) being suitable for jogging because of the weight and weight distribution. 146g on your head, and then all concentrated at the front, argh! The headband distributes the weight but nah .. imho "no 18650 headlamp is really recommendable for jogging" (©2020 kreisl), even though i never tried it, just my two cents as an opining couch potato haha. Fenix has/had an annoyingly vast selection of old/new headlamps, many of which were plasticky and light-weight (as headlamps should be) and similar in product properties, and i believe they have been trying to discontinue a good old portion. Yet afaik none of them was/is advertised as runner's light.

Short answer: while the beam profile is suitable, the total product itself is imho not suitable for running. But if you really live in a van down by the river, then i'd say that the HM61R should be the perfect personal allround lighting solution for such a living situation. It's a simple tidy neat product and therefore likable, unlike the fiddly complex mess of the Olight Array and Olight HS2 which would get on your nerves after a while. Keep it simple, stupid.

If your amazon shop allows you to buy, test, return at no hassle/cost, then you could consider this option. :grin2:

I like the suggestion of buying off of Amazon to give it a try and if you like it you could keep it or if either wanna save some money or don't like the HM61R, you could always return it.
If you liked it, but returned it to save some money you could buy it at https://www.fenix-store.com/ and save 20% off your order.

I would give the Hm65r a try. I’ll take. little bit more weight for a lot more light and run time. I used to run a lot in the dark without a light until I broke my ankle tripping on a cable strung across a sidewalk.

The weight being in front is pretty comfortable. My last headlamp had the battery pack in back although it did not have the top strap like the Fenix and it tended to slide around more.

I’m not here to sell you on Fenix, just sharing what I have experienced. IMO the light is the most important factor and everything else falls lower in order of importance. Like I noted before, it is a series of compromises. If weight is important you can use a low lumen light with a small battery. I buy a light for LIGHT!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I'm with you there! It's better to have a longer runtime and brighter light than what you think you might need, then the other way around where it's too dim and runs out of battery before you complete your run/activity.
 

seery

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The Fenix HL55 checks all the boxes for us.

Simple UI, no strobe, no hidden modes, awesome beam pattern, excellent color rendition, long runtimes, large switch that’s easy to operate (even with winter gloves), 160 degrees of tilt with positive solid ratcheting, true IPX8 rating, no external charging ports, runs on 18650 or CR123s, and most importantly it’s the toughest most durable headlamp I’ve ever seen.

One of ours has taken a few falls from over 10 feet onto concrete and has never missed a beat.
 

kreisl

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I like to protect my HM61R against unnecessary scratches, with black tape.

After much use and mostly due to the generated heat, the adhesive of the cheap black tape becomes all gooey, so i've been renewing the cheap duck tape around the exposed parts (head, tail) once or twice per year. No problem. No need to buy higher grade tape. I just use whatever is available in the household.

In any case, here comes the relevant info, how to do it neatly:
  1. Roll out some duck tape and pseudo-stick it onto "non-stick-paper" (like the backing paper from label dispensers). I have lots of backing paper, left-overs from book protection foils; they have a +1cm grid for book alignment, which comes in handy.
  2. On that backing paper, draw 2 circles whose centers are spaced exactly 45mm apart. One circle should be a "10" on my rotring stencil, the other circle should be a "10" on my other stencil.
  3. Cut the circles out with a Stanley knife. That's actually very easy to do neatly.
  4. Do parallel line cuts (parallel to the imaginary line between the two circle centers), leaving about 5mm margin for the bigger circle cut-out. Because of symmetry, the margin will be 5mm on either side of the bigger circle.
  5. Remove the backing paper and align the tape on the flashlight's head, doing a perfect cylindrical sticky wrap. Let the ends overlap to one side of the head.
  6. Complete the sticking: try your best to stick the rest of the cylinder to the spherical head.
Here a pic of the back:
img_20210810_123645pmkqe.jpg

Here a pic of the front:
img_20210810_123917gljja.jpg

Not bad kreisl.

Not bad.
 
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Lynx_Arc

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Why not just put a layer of tape on it with sticky side out wrapped tightly and a layer on top of that with the sticky side normal so the sticky is sandwiched between 2 layers of tape.
 

kreisl

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@Lynx_Arc Sounds like an idea, thanks! The adhesive side should stick to the anodized aluminum imho. Makes it more secure.

pro tip:
when you remove the degraded\damaged black duck tape after 6 months and there are gooey adhesive residues on the anodized aluminum, which you want to clean away, do the following: simply use a tiny stripe of fresh black tape and dab it onto those residues! by tearing off the fresh stripe fast, the residues will stick to the fresh tape and leave the flashlight surface. dab fast, with a shearing force to the side, you'll figure it out. after the dabbing all residues should be gone! no need to clean with rubbing alcohol or acetone afterwards.
 
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Lynx_Arc

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@Lynx_Arc Sounds like an idea, thanks! The adhesive side should stick to the anodized aluminum imho. Makes it more secure.

pro tip:
when you remove the degraded\damaged black duck tape after 6 months and there are gooey adhesive residues on the anodized aluminum, which you want to clean away, do the following: simply use a tiny stripe of fresh black tape and dab it onto those residues! by tearing off the fresh stripe fast, the residues will stick to the fresh tape and leave the flashlight surface. dab fast, with a shearing force to the side, you'll figure it out. after the dabbing all residues should be gone! no need to clean with rubbing alcohol or acetone afterwards.
I tend to try WD40 for cleaning sticky stuff off and then using alcohol to wipe off the WD40 greasiness.
 

kreisl

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  • okay a third thing. the holder at the headband is made out of hard plastic. since it is not made out of rubber/silicone, one must take care of where/how the headband is handled/carried/stored/etc because the plastic material could crack/break/get crushed in an accident: you step on it, pretty sure it'll be toast yumm. handle with care, and not challenge its fragility. the lens is also made out of plastic and should not be resistant against scratching and harsh chemicals. again, handle with care.
yesterday i tried to repair some motorized roller shutter, and since it's indoors work, i always wear the headlamp. an important spare part had fallen into a deep tight crevice around the corner, i couldn't reach it (with a piece of bent wire or similar grabbing tool) and i could hardly make it out with a mirror redirecting the lighting because the view was blocked by my fumbling hands (or their shadows). absolutely tricky to make the lost item visible to my eyes and to try to reach it with a grabbing tool, all this with two hands only!

I had to clip'n unclip the light fast, repeatedly, to determine an optimal lighting location. As it turned out, the light being unclipped and standing right next to my eye gave me a unique tiny viewing slot to hold the mirror with my left hand while operating the grabbing tool with my right hand without any of the shadows getting into my viewing line. long story short, after all a too challenging of a retrieval task, in the end i gave up, so last night i reordered the spare part for some 10€ aha.

anyway.

when i tried to unclip the light with my right hand (while holding the mirror in my left hand), i.e. single-handedly as i often did, i lifted the tail section first to unclip that successfully and then continued to lift (=tilt) the light to let the head section get unclipped automatically, in order to complete the unclipping of the entire light. That's the tried and proven operating procedure to unclip this light single-handedly, as long as you do it carefully and not brutally!

However this time the single-handed unclipping resulted in the head section clip to break and pop away. It flew away like a fly. WTF. Yeah, my bad, i guess. I mean, if you unclip the light carefully (i.e. not fast, not brutally, not etc.), with one or with two hands doesn't matter, then the plastic material woht fail you.

img_20211009_1845034cjfo.jpg

I just caht believe that this breakage happened to me, the tool-petting poser kreisl! :oops:

img_20211009_184616i9jg0.jpg

Fenix used a low density polymer type of hard plastic (very cheap quality!) which is light-weight and serves its purpose of clipping and holding a light but which easily snaps, breaks, cracks. Shame on Fenix. Replacing the part would cost 14.5€ shipped lmao. Why would someone pay that much to get the same very cheap quality again?? I would accept a free replacement from the distributor or the manufacturer but not this. Or i'd accept paying 14.5€ in return for a high quality item. But this plastic part is made out of sh*t:poop: material quality, worthless, cr*p.

Going forward, what are my acceptable options?

I simply continue to use the broken holder (holder1), as one intact clip suffices to hold the light; and i could finally make use of the rubber securing strap. And once that clip eventually breaks off too (i would update this thread then stay stuned!), i would throw the holder away and could use the holder of my 2nd hm61r unit as replacement (holder2). From then on, i would handle the holder2 with even more care and caution, in an effort to never break the clips again.
Or, i should really give the rubber clip holders by Armytek/Skilhunt/etc a try. Some day, i will. I am interested. No hurries though.

Most importantly, do i regret having purchased the hm61r as my primary, most used flashlight (for work, walks, or as headlamp), is the cr*ppy plastic material of the otherwise very functional holder reason enough to turn one's back on the product? No and no. The light is just too great, the headband itself is also fantastic (holding up so far, at least), and only because Fenix chose a cheap quality plastic (advantage: light weight!) for the clipping holder it wouldn't be fair to dismiss the entire product. This Fenix product does indeed tick all the boxes, show me another 18650 headlamp which clearly beats it in all aspects. As of 2021, there isn't one.

But true enough: shame on Fenix for having chosen this cheap plastic material (similar to ABS) for the holder. Since literally millions of polymer plastic varieties exist on the market, the responsibles at Fenix Company should have chosen a durable robust hard plastic material like HDPP instead. The other week i had to destroy a bunch of household plastic products into little pieces for recycling purposes; most of them were made out of polypropylene, and man, some of the items, at only 1.0mm wall thickness, were super tough to cut/break/crack/destroy/tear/snap/anything/etc. It opened my eyes on how robust and unbreakable items made out of polypropylene can be! Yeah sure, it is higher density (=heavier) than the "ABS" which Fenix used for producing the holder but let's be honest here, the original hm61r holder is not suitable for professional use, in a real duty work environment.

Uncareful unclipping of the light resulted in a broken clip. What a joke! :twak:
 
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Lynx_Arc

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yesterday i tried to repair some motorized roller shutter, and since it's indoors work, i always wear the headlamp. an important spare part had fallen into a deep tight crevice around the corner, i couldn't reach it (with a piece of bent wire or similar grabbing tool) and i could hardly make it out with a mirror redirecting the lighting because the view was blocked by my fumbling hands (or their shadows). absolutely tricky to make the lost item visible to my eyes and to try to reach it with a grabbing tool, all this with two hands only!

I had to clip'n unclip the light fast, repeatedly, to determine an optimal lighting location. As it turned out, the light being unclipped and standing right next to my eye gave me a unique tiny viewing slot to hold the mirror with my left hand while operating the grabbing tool with my right hand without any of the shadows getting into my viewing line. long story short, after all a too challenging of a retrieval task, in the end i gave up, so last night i reordered the spare part for some 10€ aha.

anyway.

when i tried to unclip the light with my right hand (while holding the mirror in my left hand), i.e. single-handedly as i often did, i lifted the tail section first to unclip that successfully and then continued to lift (=tilt) the light to let the head section get unclipped automatically, in order to complete the unclipping of the entire light. That's the tried and proven operating procedure to unclip this light single-handedly, as long as you do it carefully and not brutally!

However this time the single-handed unclipping resulted in the head section clip to break and pop away. It flew away like a fly. WTF. Yeah, my bad, i guess. I mean, if you unclip the light carefully (i.e. not fast, not brutally, not etc.), with one or with two hands doesn't matter, then the plastic material woht fail you.

View attachment 17987

I just caht believe that this breakage happened to me, the tool-petting poser kreisl! :oops:

View attachment 17988

Fenix used a low density polymer type of hard plastic (very cheap quality!) which is light-weight and serves its purpose of clipping and holding a light but which easily snaps, breaks, cracks. Shame on Fenix. Replacing the part would cost 14.5€ shipped lmao. Why would someone pay that much to get the same very cheap quality again?? I would accept a free replacement from the distributor or the manufacturer but not this. Or i'd accept paying 14.5€ in return for a high quality item. But this plastic part is made out of sh*t:poop: material quality, worthless, cr*p.

Going forward, what are my acceptable options?

I simply continue to use the broken holder (holder1), as one intact clip suffices to hold the light; and i could finally make use of the rubber securing strap. And once that clip eventually breaks off too (i would update this thread then stay stuned!), i would throw the holder away and could use the holder of my 2nd hm61r unit as replacement (holder2). From then on, i would handle the holder2 with even more care and caution, in an effort to never break the clips again.
Or, i should really give the rubber clip holders by Armytek/Skilhunt/etc a try. Some day, i will. I am interested. No hurries though.

Most importantly, do i regret having purchased the hm61r as my primary, most used flashlight (for work, walks, or as headlamp), is the cr*ppy plastic material of the otherwise very functional holder reason enough to turn one's back on the product? No and no. The light is just too great, the headband itself is also fantastic (holding up so far, at least), and only because Fenix chose a cheap quality plastic (advantage: light weight!) for the clipping holder it wouldn't be fair to dismiss the entire product. This Fenix product does indeed tick all the boxes, show me another 18650 headlamp which clearly beats it in all aspects. As of 2021, there isn't one.

But true enough: shame on Fenix for having chosen this cheap plastic material (similar to ABS) for the holder. Since literally millions of polymer plastic varieties exist on the market, the responsibles at Fenix Company should have chosen a durable robust hard plastic material like HDPP instead. The other week i had to destroy a bunch of household plastic products into little pieces for recycling purposes; most of them were made out of polypropylene, and man, some of the items, at only 1.0mm wall thickness, were super tough to cut/break/crack/destroy/tear/snap/anything/etc. It opened my eyes on how robust and unbreakable items made out of polypropylene can be! Yeah sure, it is higher density (=heavier) than the "ABS" which Fenix used for producing the holder but let's be honest here, the original hm61r holder is not suitable for professional use, in a real duty work environment.

Uncareful unclipping of the light resulted in a broken clip. What a joke! :twak:
I use a right angle Wowtac A2S with an aftermarket headband with rubber loop holder and it works well but it isn't easy to remove the headlamp at all from it especially one handed. I chose the headband for 2 reasons, the first is the original headband had over the top strap and these were single strap. The second reason is headbands wear out in heavy use and I use the headlamp on a hard hat and since I bought 2 of these if one did get damaged or worn out I would have a backup. I was once considering the Fenix HL30 (I think) headlamp that takes 1AA or 1 CR123 with separate tubes for each. The light has a metal clip type holder that likely scratches the light a lot wearing the anodizing off which is a drawback. I didn't buy the headlamp because the runtimes/outputs were not good enough for my uses too low for too short of time to suffice in heavy use. I instead use 18650 headlamps now and strongly recommend that format over any other out there to folks.
 

Stefano

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I think the soft rubber mount could be a good option to replace the broken one.
Unfortunately Armytek no longer produces them and only the Zebralight choice remains The Armytek rubber ones were larger and more comfortable than the Zebra ones.
It can also be used as an angular torch with the whole headband holding it in your hand.
If you only buy the rubber holder you should spend little
 

kreisl

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Messages
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I simply continue to use the broken holder (holder1), as one intact clip suffices to hold the light; and i could finally make use of the rubber securing strap.
last night for some work around de house i tried that solution (1 clip, plus original rubber strap) and it worked really well. with the headband mounted on de head, i use 2 hands for the clipping\unclipping (incl. strapping\unstrapping) and one can manage to do it without a mirror haha.
maybe it's best to do it with the headband not mounted on de head. as a reminder, i had broken the clip when i was trying to unclip the light singlehandedly with the headband mounted on de head: the rough uncontrolled singlehanded unclipping resulted in the breakage.
 

Lynx_Arc

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Perhaps it is time to have a second light that doesn't need to be unclipped around when working so you don't need to undo your headlamp at all. After all 2 lights are better than 1.
 

kreisl

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Perhaps it is time to have a second light that doesn't need to be unclipped around when working so you don't need to undo your headlamp at all. After all 2 lights are better than 1.
yee-yee, i do have 2 units of the light. :clap:


and for work jobs i always have the nietcore tm15 with me. that retrieval job was exceptional; usually i wouldn't unclip the headlamp during work. but sure, if i had more work jobs like that, more frequently, i would take the 2nd unit with me as standalone light. good thinking there! :buttrock:
 
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