Fenix TK75 (3xXM-L U2, 4x18650) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS, VIDEO and more!

selfbuilt

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May 27, 2006
Messages
6,936
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Canada
Warning: pic heavy, as usual.

TK75001.jpg

TK75004.jpg


The TK75 is the latest high-output thrower light from Fenix, using 3x XM-L U2 emitters, and running off 4x18650. Although it was released a couple of months ago, my review sample came just a couple of weeks ago. Let's see how it compares to other lights in this class that I've reviewed recently …. :whistle:

Manufacturer's Specifications:
Note: as always, these are only what the manufacturer reports. To see my actual testing results, scroll down the review.

  • Utilizes three Cree XM-L (U2) LEDs
  • Uses four 18650 rechargeable Li-ion batteries when needed but also can be powered by two 18650 rechargeable Li-ion batteries
  • Beaam Intensity: 92,000 cd
  • Beam distance: 606-meter beam throw
  • Output mode / Runtime: Turbo: 2600 lumens / 1h 15min, High: 1100 lumens / 4h, Mid: 400 lumens / 12h, Low: 18 lumens / 200h
  • Strobe: 2600 lumens, SOS: 400 lumens
  • Digitally regulated output - maintains constant brightness
  • Over 8-day run time, suitable for long-time searching
  • Over 80-degree flood beam angle to provide a panoramic view
  • Reverse polarity protection, to protect from improper battery installation
  • Over-discharge protection circuit, protect the rechargeable batteries effectively
  • Intelligent Memory Circuit
  • Over-discharge protection circuit
  • Low-voltage warning function to alert users to replace the batteries
  • Capable of standing up securely on a flat surface as a candle
  • Run time can be extended with the addition of a body tube segment and battery holder (sold as an accessory kit). Run time will double with each segment-holder addition but brightness levels will not change.
  • Made of durable aircraft-grade aluminum
  • Premium Type III hard-anodized anti-abrasive finish
  • Impact resistant: 1m
  • Waterproof: IPX-8, underwater 2m
  • Toughened ultra-clear glass lens with anti-reflective coating
  • Dimensions and Weight: Length: 7.28" / 185mm, Diameter: 2.07" / 52.5mm, Head Diameter: 3.45" / 87.5mm
  • Weight: 18oz / 510gm
  • Accessories: Lanyard, two spare o-rings
  • MSRP: ~$200
TK75006.jpg


My TK75 came as a review sample, so only the bare light with no packaging. I imagine you get the standard Fenix extras, like a wrist lanyard, extra o-rings and manual.

TK75036.jpg

TK75043.jpg

TK75057.jpg

From left to right: AW Protected 18650; Fenix TK75; Nitecore TM15; Crelant 7G9; Thrunite TN30; Olight SR92; Thrunite TN30.

All dimensions are directly measured, and given with no batteries installed:

Fenix TK75: Weight: 516.0g (700g with 4x18650), Length: 184mm, Width (bezel): 87.5mm
Nitecore TM15: Weight: 450.6g (634g with 4x18650). Length: 158mm, Width (bezel): 59.5mm
Nitecore TM11: Weight: 342.6g (526g with 8xCR123A), Length 135.3mm, Width (bezel): 59.5mm
Sunwayman T60CS: Weight: 338.9g (est 477g with 3x18650), Length: 145.0mm, Width (bezel): 60.0mm
Thrunite TN30: Weight: 468.2g (est 620g with 3x18650), Length: 179mm, Width (bezel): 64.3mm, Width (tailcap): 49.0mm
Xtar S1 Production: Weight: 876.0g (est. 1028g with 3x18650 protected), Length: 240mm, Width (bezel): 83.4mm
Olight SR92: Weight: 1.15 kg (with battery pack), Length: 271mm, Width (bezel): 98mm

The overall length of the TK75 is in keeping with other "throwy" 3x emitter lights (which typically have deeper reflectors - like the Crelant 7G9, Xtar S1, Nitecore TM15, and Thrunite TN30). It is certainly longer than the more compact lights with shallow reflectors (e.g. Nitecore TM11, Sunwayman T60CS). And of course, the bezel width is considerably wider than typical (second only to the SR92 in my testing).

TK75007.jpg

TK75019.jpg

TK75028.jpg

TK75021.jpg


The TK75 has a distinctive shape and look, with its relatively wide (but shallow) head. Anodizing is a flat black, and seems in very good shape on my sample. There are some small nicks on the threads, but these aren't visible in use and don't affect function (i.e., current path is carried through the carrier springs). There are no body labels on my review sample.

As with other recent Fenix lights in this TK-series class, there is no knurling per se on the light. Rather, there is an overall checkered pattern on the handle. Each checkered segment has a large number of tiny concentric ring ridges. This contributes to fairly decent grip. Combined with the other build elements and ridge detail, you should find overall grip good.

Threads are square-cut, and generally seem of good quality. However, there was some damage to the base of threads on sample, near the opening of the light (shown below).

TK75025.jpg


I've seen these sorts of machining defects before – they aren't typically a big deal, but they do contribute to a "grittiness" when screwing on the tailcap. As you can tell above, I've added some extra Nyogel lube in this region, which helps smooth out the action.

The TK75 uses electronic switches in the head to control on/off and mode switching. The right switch controls on/off, and the left controls output level selection. Switch feel is good, and there is a definite "click" when making full contact. Scroll down for a discussion of the user interface.

Inside the head, there are two contact rings for the positive and negative current paths of the carrier.

TK75030.jpg

TK75031.jpg

TK75032.jpg

TK75034.jpg


The carrier is definitely improved from earlier TK-series models I reviewed. The plastic is much thicker now, with a sturdier feel. The bays appear wide enough to accommodate a wide range of cell diameters, and I had no problem fitting the loaded carrier into the light with any of my cells. You may find longer cells a bit tight in the carrier, however. The raised contact disc at the positive terminal means flat-top cells will work fine. :thumbsup:

A few nice touches – I like the slight cut-outs near the positive terminals, to facilitate getting your cells out. Note that the carrier still connects the same way as earlier models, through the inner and outer spring contacts on the head of the carrier.

The carrier is clearly organized in a 2s2p arrangement. This means that you could easily run 2x18650 cells in a pinch, as long they as they were located in adjoining cells to appropriately complete a circuit (i.e., side-by-side bays, with one pointing up and the other pointing down, as indicated by the carrier). Of course, I STRONGLY advise against trying to run the light on Hi or Turbo this way, as you would exceed the discharge rate capabilities of the cells (although I suppose IMR 18650 may be able to handle it).

Surprisingly, despite CR123A or RCR being banned in the light, Fenix advises that 4xCR123A or 8xCR123A can be run in an emergency. The circuit can apparently handle the higher voltage source, but drops to a single low brightness level. Personally, I don't recommend you try this.

And as always, I urge you to take care and make sure you insert the cells correctly in the carrier (i.e., partially inverted cells would lead to rapid reverse-charging damage to the cells and carrier).

TK75015.jpg

TK75053.jpg

TK75047.jpg

TK75051.jpg


TK75 has a distinctive head, with three overlapping reflector wells in a common reflector. Despite the rather shallow depth of the individual wells, the TK75 has impressive throw (scroll down for beamshots). The reflector appears to be in excellent shape on my sample, very smooth, with three well-centered XM-L cool white emitters.

User Interface

Like the other members of the Fenix TK-series, the TK75 uses two electronic switches to control on/off and mode selection. These are located just under head, in the traditional location of mainstream consumer flashlights.

The right button is the main On/Off switch – click (press and release) to turn the light on or off.

The left button is output selection switch. Click it to advance through the output modes. The TK75 has four main output levels, accessed in repeating sequence: Lo > Med > Hi > Turbo. The light has output level memory, and will come back on at whatever level you last turned it off in.

The light also has strobe/SOS modes, but these are "hidden" away from the main sequence. :thumbsup: To access these flashing modes, press and hold the left button. If you hold the button down for ~2 secs, you will get a tactical strobe mode. If you hold the button down for >3 secs, you will get a lower output SOS mode. Click the left button to return to the last constant output mode (or turn off/on by the right button). There is no mode memory for the flashing modes.

Note that you can access the strobe/SOS modes from off by pressing and holding the left button.

Video Overview

For more information on the light, including the build and user interface, please see my video overview:



As always, videos are recorded in 720p, but YouTube typically defaults to 360p. Once the video is running, you can click on the configuration settings icon and select the higher 480p to 720p options. You can also run full-screen. :)

Strobe

There is no sign of PWM on any level – I believe the light is current-controlled, as expected. :)

TK75-Strobe1.gif


The TK75 uses an oscillating max output strobe, that switches back-and-forth between two frequencies (15.2 Hz and 6.7Hz), every ~2.2 secs or so. Here's a close-up of the switch:

TK75-Strobe2.gif


It is very disorienting. :rolleyes:

I haven't shown the SOS mode, but it is lower output than the Strobe mode.

Standby Drain

Due to the electronic switch, the TK75 will always be drawing a small current when the carrier is connected to the head. I measured this current as 56uA on my sample. Given the 2s2p carrier arrangement, and assuming four times at least 2600mAh capacity batteries, that would give you >10 years before fully charged batteries would be completely drained. This is so low as to be completely negligible.

However, it is always a good practice to be able to lock-out your light to prevent accidental activation. Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be any sort of electronic lock-out on the TK75 that I can find. And unscrewing the tailcap doesn't help much, as it is the tension on the springs in the carrier that makes contact (i.e., you would have to unscrew the tailcap several full turns). :shrug:

Beamshots:

And now, what you have all been waiting for. ;) All lights are on their respective max rechargeable battery sources (i.e., 18650s), about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences.

TK75-Beam001.jpg
TM15-Beam001.jpg

T60CS-Beam001.jpg
TN30-Beam001.jpg


TK75-Beam002.jpg
TM15-Beam002.jpg

T60CS-Beam002.jpg
TN30-Beam002.jpg


TK75-Beam003.jpg
TM15-Beam003.jpg

T60CS-Beam003.jpg
TN30-Beam003.jpg


TK75-Beam004.jpg
TM15-Beam004.jpg

T60CS-Beam004.jpg
TN30-Beam004.jpg


The TM75 clearly has a very throwy beam, surprisingly well focused even at this ridiculously close distance. As with all 3xXM-L lights, there are some "daisy flower-like" artifacts in the spillbeam. These are the most obvious in the periphery of the beam, which is why you don't notice them above. That said, the TK75 is not that bad, especially compared to most of the other particularly throwy lights (i.e., I find "throwy" lights tend to have more artifacts than "floodier" versions). As I think you'll see above, the immediate spillbeam is relatively clean. :thumbsup:

Unfortunately, we have a lot of snow on the ground here in Canada at the moment (early February). :p So it would not be too easy (or valuable) to try and take outdoor beamshots in my usual location.

In the meantime, here are some indoor shots. These will at least allow you to compare the throw and spill to other 3xXM-L lights in my collection. For your reference, the back of the couch is about 7 feet away (~2.3m) from the opening of the light, and the far wall is about 18 feet away (~5.9m). Below I am showing a series of exposures, to allow you to better compare hotspot and spill.

TK75-TM15-TN30-Beam10.gif

TK75-T60CS-SR92-Beam10.gif


TK75-TM15-TN30-Beam25.gif

TK75-T60CS-SR92-Beam25.gif


TK75-TM15-TN30-Beam100.gif

TK75-T60CS-SR92-Beam100.gif


As you can probably tell, the TK75 has a fairly wide spillbeam. Not quite as wide as the lights with shallower reflectors, like the Sunwayman T60CS or Nitecore TM11 (not shown), but wider than you might expect for the amount of throw. It is also rather bright, especially in the near area of spill.

Center-beam throw is where the TK75 really distinguishes itself – without a doubt, this is the furthest throwing 3xXM-L light I've tested yet. :eek:oo:

Sorry I forgot to include the Xtar S1 in the comparisons above, but the TK75 out-throws it by a noticeable margin. The TK75 also has fewer spillbeam artifacts than the S1.

In terms of beam tint, my TK75 is very much in keeping with most of my other 3xXM-L lights (i.e., slightly warm-tinted in the centre, cooler-tinted around the periphery). Although hard to tell with the auto white balance above, only my Olight SR92 is particularly green-yellow tinted overall. But as with all current-controlled lights, there is some relative warm tint shifting at the lower output levels.

I will update the above with outdoor beamshots once the spring thaw hits us here. :wave:

UPDATE JUNE 18, 2013:

For outdoor beamshots, these are all done in the style of my earlier 100-yard round-up review. Please see that thread for a discussion of the topography (i.e. the road dips in the distance, to better show you the corona in the mid-ground).

FYI, any "streaks" you see across the images are bug-trails. Flying insects are often attracted to the bright lights, and their flight trails get captured as swirly streaks due to the long exposure time. :)

BKFA02-TN30-TK75.gif

BKFA02-TN30-TK75z.gif



Testing Method:

All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, a la Quickbeam's flashlightreviews.com method. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

Throw/Output Summary Chart:

My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables. Effective July 2012, I have updated all my Peak Intensity/Beam Distance measures with a NIST-certified Extech EA31 lightmeter (orange highlights).

TK75-FL1-Summary.gif


Turbo output is quite high on the TK75 – second only to my Thrunite TN30. But in terms of throw, the TK75 is the leader of the pack – higher than all my other 3xXM-L lights. :eek:oo: It's also good to see that the ANSI FL-1 beam intensity 92,000 cd spec matches so closely to my direct testing result.

Here is how the Fenix lumen specs compare to my own method of lumen estimation method for high-output lights:

TK75-Lumens.gif


In a word or two, pretty close! As this is the first high-output Fenix light I've reviewed in awhile, it's good to see it matches well with the calibration scale used for the other lights. :)

Output/Runtime Comparison:

Note: All my standard 18650 runtimes are done using AW protected 2200mAh.

TK75-NoRestart-18650.gif


Runtime testing of the TK75 is slightly complicated by the fact that the light has an automatic step-down after 20 mins runtime. This means that higher capacity batteries will have much longer runtime at the lower levels, as you might expect (e.g. see above).

But this is not representational of what kind of runtime you would expect if you only used the light for brief periods of time repeatedly, or if you over-rode the step-down by cycling back to Turbo. I have done this for several groups of batteries below, by restarting Turbo mode every 20 mins:

TK75-Restart-18650.gif


First thing to notice is that the light eventually steps down to the lower levels, even with repeated restarts. Once the circuit determines battery voltage has dropped low enough, it no longer allows Turbo output. If you try to switch back up to Turbo, it immediately steps down to Hi.

But the second point to the graph above – and this is interesting – is that my relatively "low capacity" 2200mAh AW batteries were actually able to last at least as long on repeated Turbo compared my so-called "high capacity" 3100mAh Xtar or 4GREER batteries. Of course, the 3100mAh batteries last a lot longer overall, once the step-downs occur.

The point to this is that the overall capacity rating of a battery is typically based on a fairly low drive current. At higher currents, all cells deplete faster. Due to differences in how cells are designed (and the circuits used in the final batteries), some brands and types of cells are better suited for some discharge rates over others. HKJ has done extensive testing of various brands, to help you choose the best type of cell for a given discharge rate – check out his reviews in the batteries subforum here.

In any case, the above result shows that there is not much difference in the maximum Turbo-level runtime on my 2200mAh or 3100mAh batteries (i.e., under an hour, even with restarts). I expect you might do better with some of the 2600mAh cells, as they often seem to be better suited for high discharge rate applications. If you plan to run the light predominantly on Turbo, it is worth investigating what type of cell has the best performance at these drive levels. If you plan to use the light at lower settings, the overall capacity rating of the cell is probably a reasonably good indicator of performance.

Now that we have that out of the way, let's see how the TK75 compares to other lights in my collection – all run on AW Protected 2200mAh 18650 cells. :whistle:

TK75-Turbo18650.gif


TK75-Hi18650.gif


For Turbo, you are best looking at the restarted graph, to facilitate comparisons to other lights that don't step down. The take home message on Hi and Turbo is that the TK75 is a top performer – efficiency seems excellent on the four 18650 cells, outperforming my current-controlled Nitecore TM11 and TM15.

TK75-Med18650.gif


On the Med level, the picture changes somewhat. While the TK75 is still an excellent performer, the TM11/15 seem to have an efficiency advantage. Although that's a bit hard to say, since the TK75 steps down to a sustained Lo mode first.

But any way you slice it, the TK75 shows outstanding regulation (i.e. perfectly flat at each step) and excellent efficiency. :)

Just like their output and beam distance specs, the Fenix ANSI FL-1 runtimes specs seem quite accurate. Keep in mind the Fenix specs are based on the 2600mAh Fenix ARB-L2 18650, so you would expect proportionally greater runtime than on my AW 2200mAh cells.

Potential Issues

Unlike some of the competition, Fenix doesn't support CR123A or RCR in the TK75 (i.e., 18650 only). Oddly, the manual is a little inconsistent on CR123A – while it lists them as "banned", the manual later goes on to say that 4x or 8x CR123 can be run in an emergency – but the circuit will limit you to a single very low level output, without level controls.

The TK75 lacks any sort of electronic lock-out mode, and a physical lock-out requires several turns of the tailcap (to break the tension on the carrier springs). While not a concern for standby drain (which is negligible, and around the self-discharge rate of the batteries), lack of a robust lock-out is an issue for accidental activation. Since the light can be activated, in some form, by a sustained press of either button, it would be good to introduce a lock-out feature.

Due to the overlapping reflector design, there are bound to be some artifacts in the periphery of the spillbeam. The TK75 is better than I expected in this regard, for a relatively "throwy" 3xXM-L light.

Preliminary Observations

If you want a very "throwy" high-output, 3xXM-L emitter light, the TK75 is probably one of the best places to start looking. :)

Build is distinctive – the overall proportions remain quite reasonable, but the large, relatively flat head really stands out in this class. Build quality is very high, as with most Fenix lights (although there was some minor machining damage on the threads of my sample). I'm particular glad to see the updates to the battery carrier design – this is the first Fenix carrier that gives me full confidence of long-term stability.

Overall efficiency and regulation pattern remain top-notch, as always for Fenix. Keep in mind however that the light has a timed step-down from Turbo after 20 mins. Although you can restart Turbo mode immediately (and repeatedly), you are realistically limited to under an hour of max output on most 18650 cells. This is because the light also features additional automatic step-downs in output as battery capacity depletes.

This automatic step-down feature is a very good idea in my view. Many fully regulated lights abruptly shut-off without warning, once the battery protection circuit is tripped - this can leave you stumbling in the dark. As a result, I prefer this fully-regulated step-down design, or a more gradually dimming direct-drive-like pattern.

The user interface is serviceable – it is fairly straight-forward, and doesn't take long to get used to. It is also fairly consistent with earlier TK-series lights (with a few updates, like the ability to access strobe from off). That said, I still don't find it particularly intuitive, and I tend to forget which button does what sometimes. A better interface for me would be to allow off/on by a sustained press of either button, and then cycle down and up by the left and right buttons respectively, as that would at least be consistent for either hand. But of course, your preferences may vary. :)

The beam of the TK75 is very impressive – I am surprised that they managed to get so much throw from such relatively shallow reflectors. Currently, the TK75 is the best throwing 3xXM-L light in my collection. As a bonus, there are relatively few spillbeam artifacts for such a throwy light – while still present, they are not as bad as I was expecting, given the throw.

One limitation to consider is the restriction to 18650 only. If you want to use CR123As, you will be limited to a single low output mode. But if it's any consolation, at least the 2s2p configuration would allow you to run 2x18650 in a pinch. Just please don't try running the light on Hi/Turbo on just two cells, as you will likely exceed their max discharge rates (IMR may be an exception).

The TK75 is a nice evolution of the TK-series line from Fenix. It's good to see the updates from the earlier models, and the overall package is impressive. Although there are still a few tweaks that I would like, there is no denying that this is one of the best performers you will find in this class – especially if you are looking for a "throw monster." :wave:

----

TK75 provided by Fenix for review.
 
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TEEJ

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Nice!


BTW - You don't have a TK70 for comparison?

Any guesses about the beam comparisons between them?

:D
 

CouldUseALight

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Oct 21, 2012
Messages
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Thanks for the usual super review, selfbuilt! Great to see Fenix's specs borne out! :party:

My TK75 would not light on 2 18650s and I was confused by the verbiage in the manual re: 123 batteries. Your unit works in practice with 2 18650s? Maybe I had them in the wrong battery carrier slots.:shrug:

The battery carrier on this light rocks. :grin2:
 

selfbuilt

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BTW - You don't have a TK70 for comparison?
Any guesses about the beam comparisons between them?
No, I don't have a TK70 - If I did, it would be in the tables and graphs. ;) I would just be speculating as to how the beam compares, so I'll leave that instead to those who actually own both.

My TK75 would not light on 2 18650s and I was confused by the verbiage in the manual re: 123 batteries. Your unit works in practice with 2 18650s? Maybe I had them in the wrong battery carrier slots.:shrug:
Yes, it worked fine for me. The important part is to put the cells in the appropriate bays in series (as I mentioned in the review - "side-by-side bays, with one pointing up and the other pointing down, as indicated by the carrier"). You can verify with a DMM to make sure you have them in the right bays - you should get ~8.4V across the positive and negative contacts on top of the carrier, for two fully charged cells.
 

selfbuilt

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If it helps, here's an illustration of how to insert 2x18650 (or for that matter, 4xCR123A if you needed to):

TK75033.jpg
 

KarstGhost

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Nov 24, 2009
Messages
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Thank you for the review, excellent as always.

I probably won't replace my TM15 with this one anytime soon...but nearly twice the throw of the TM15 is impressive though.
 

magnum70383

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Thanks for the review! I guess I'll skip buying this light since I got the S6330 and never seem to need throw
 

Warsaw

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Feb 6, 2013
Messages
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Thanks for great review as always. I guess I will also skip this light since combo TK70 (better throw than TK75) + Zebralight S6330 (flood, smaller) will do the job.:) Regards.
 

TEEJ

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No, I don't have a TK70 - If I did, it would be in the tables and graphs. ;) I would just be speculating as to how the beam compares, so I'll leave that instead to those who actually own both.

LOL

You make me want to buy you lights.

:D
 

Kick

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Awesome review Selfbuilt! I always enjoy your fair evaluations!
I have to agree. I have been lurking on the forums for a while and decided to comment on how awesome your reviews are. This review has made up my mind on purchasing this light to go along with my tk35. :D
 

selfbuilt

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Thanks everyone, glad you are enjoying the comparisons. :grouphug:

I am of course limited in the lights i have on hand, but there are always more coming. :whistle:

Looking forward to getting back outside as well. I will be doing the TK75 at that time.
 

romteb

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Everytime i see a new Selfbuilt review pop up i'm happy and incredulous considering i have free access to such quality material, Selfbuilt you're awesome.
 

snala

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Impartial, consistent and always quality Selfbuilt. Everyone says it because it's true. Ta for the time you spend doing these reviews which saves so much for everyone else.
Just wish you get given more prototypes before our purchasing decision time frames although that could be counter productive for some flashlights :sssh:.
Although in this case it's just reinforcing my purchase happiness :thumbsup:

Cheers!
 
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selfbuilt

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Thanks again all for the support everyone. :)

Just wish you get given more prototypes before our purchasing decision time frames although that could be counter productive for some flashlights :sssh:.
Yes, I have often had the same thought. A lot of mistakes could be sorted out early, if prototype samples were shared. Of course, once a launch is imminent, the economics of the market place take over for most makers. :whistle:

I am sure a lot of makers do actually solicit feedback on models in development, but it's not the same as actually sending them out for full evaluations. It's also true that my review schedule is pretty full though, so not sure how many I could evaluate anyway.
 
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harro

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Thankyou for the great review selfbuilt. Just wondered if the torch has a TOL as well as the timed stepdown at 20 minutes ?
ie, will it step down a level, from heat buildup, before it does so, with the timer ? The question is in relation to using the torch in hotter climates.
Many thanks again;
Mike.
 

selfbuilt

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Thankyou for the great review selfbuilt. Just wondered if the torch has a TOL as well as the timed stepdown at 20 minutes ?
ie, will it step down a level, from heat buildup, before it does so, with the timer ? The question is in relation to using the torch in hotter climates.
I don't believe so. There is no evidence of a thermal step-down in my testing (although runtimes were all done under a cooling fan). I certainly didn't notice any sign of one during regular use. And even in the cases where I repeatedly re-started the light (which would have led to greater heat, despite the cooling fan), the eventual step-down occurred at a specific battery voltage (i.e., was independent of heat). There is also no mention of one in any of the Fenix documentation - so it looks like there is just the timed and voltage step-down features.
 
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