Fossil or renewable. What is the future?

bykfixer

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One wonders 🤨 how much effort it takes to utilize that sink sans nasty water splashing everywhere.
An American approach could easily solve that. A couple of T's and tubing on the tank filler line, a pedal to step on to acivate the clean water and a deeper bowl to reduce the splashing. But like Orbital said "it'll meet with resistance" here.
 
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the sink is clean water, that adds to filling the tank after washing hands
Yes, of course. But the water is no longer sanitary after washing your hands. Right? :yellowlaugh: I'm not thinking of the water that drains into the tank and then is flushed into the bowl. My concern is the water that splashes all over the toilet and the floor.

I'd be more open to the idea if the sink were deeper.

However, there's a saying: "Don't poop where you eat." Well, I don't want to wash my hands there either. :barf:
 
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bykfixer

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To the well/septic thing: septic water is near the surface and is..... septic. Well water comes from aquifers deep underground and is not septic.

To the municiple system. The water in my area starts from a resevior upstream and gets sent (post treatment) to the same river down stream about 10 miles away.
 

orbital

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Three things you can buy at just about any store:

~Disinfecting hand soap
~Bleach
..and yes, Toilet paper

I guess there would need to detailed instructions on general bathroom usage.
 
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Three things you can buy at just about any store:

~Disinfecting hand soap
"What's the deal with this new disinfecting hand soap? Didn't our old soap do the same thing? I thought we had an agreement that that's what it did."
- Jerry Seinfeld

~Bleach
..and yes, Toilet paper

I guess there would need to detailed instructions on general bathroom usage.
Being employed as a caregiver, I recently had to take a class on proper handwashing techniques. Trust me when I tell you, most of us are doing it wrong.
 
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To the well/septic thing: septic water is near the surface and is..... septic. Well water comes from aquifers deep underground and is not septic.
I think that's correct. My mother's drain field is about five feet deep. I don't think the greywater from it ever sinks deep enough to mix with an aquifer. Our water supplier, Parkland Light & Water, owns 12 wells that are from 30 to 630 feet deep.

Unfortunately, I have recently become knowledgeable about such things.

IMG_5046.JPG
 

Hooked on Fenix

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I'm on a municipal water system. Most of the water I use comes from a water treatment plant that recycles used water. How would this system save any significant amount of water? Same question for anyone using well water with a septic system. Doesn't a septic system basically recycle used water?
I had to work at two different water treatment facilities, one in Riverside, CA and at a short time in Hemet, CA around spring of 2015. After doing electrical work on their PCLs, lighting, wiring through underground vaults, etc. I wouldn't want my water coming from such a disgusting source. They have these above ground square pools full of :poop: water called clarifiers that are treated with chemicals, then run down a channel for further treatment with filtration.

Working there, 100 miles from home and only able to go home to shower on weekends (camped nearby, made only $14 an hour and gas was $5 a gallon) nobody noticed I smelled because after the first few days of work, the smell in the air singed off all your nose hairs. You had to have an iron stomach to work there and eat lunch outdoors. They tried putting picnic tables at the bottom of the hill as a courtesy to employees, but nobody used them because that was in the valley where there was no wind to blow the smell away so it lingered there. We all took our meals higher up on the hill just passed the connecting channels and the clarifiers, or as we lovingly called them, :poop:Creek and the Lunch Loss Lakes. This was the Riverside facility.

I got to work at the Hemet location after having a weak stomach recovering from the flu. The place smelled too, but was much smaller. That job was short and was mostly lifting 260 lb. spools of wire around to empty out Connex boxes full of the wire. One Journeyman tried to get me to lift four spools at once onto a couple jackstands (about 260 lbs. x2 on close side and 260 lbs.+100 lbs. -ground wire on the other). He told me to stop when I got the first two off the ground and was bending the pipe that ran through the spools (OCAL- pvc coated Ridgid conduit). I miss being that strong. On the Riverside job, I broke a piece of 2500 lb. rated mule tape on a tough wire pull that afterward required an Gradall forklift. Try avoiding drinking crap to tap water. I know where it's been.
 
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vincent3685

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I had to work at two different water treatment facilities, one in Riverside, CA and at a short time in Hemet, CA around spring of 2015. After doing electrical work on their PCLs, lighting, wiring through underground vaults, etc. I wouldn't want my water coming from such a disgusting source. They have these above ground square pools full of :poop: water called clarifiers that are treated with chemicals, then run down a channel for further treatment with filtration.

Working there, 100 miles from home and only able to go home to shower on weekends (camped nearby, made only $14 an hour and gas was $5 a gallon) nobody noticed I smelled because after the first few days of work, the smell in the air singed off all your nose hairs. You had to have an iron stomach to work there and eat lunch outdoors. They tried putting picnic tables at the bottom of the hill as a courtesy to employees, but nobody used them because that was in the valley where there was no wind to blow the smell away so it lingered there. We all took our meals higher up on the hill just passed the connecting channels and the clarifiers, or as we lovingly called them, :poop:Creek and the Lunch Loss Lakes. This was the Riverside facility.

I got to work at the Hemet location after having a weak stomach recovering from the flu. The place smelled too, but was much smaller. That job was short and was mostly lifting 260 lb. spools of wire around to empty out Connex boxes full of the wire. One Journeyman tried to get me to lift four spools at once onto a couple jackstands (about 260 lbs. x2 on close side and 260 lbs.+100 lbs. -ground wire on the other). He told me to stop when I got the first two off the ground and was bending the pipe that ran through the spools (OCAL- pvc coated Ridgid conduit). I miss being that strong. On the Riverside job, I broke a piece of 2500 lb. rated mule tape on a tough wire pull that afterward required an Gradall forklift. Try avoiding drinking crap to tap water. I know where it's been.
Thank you for your unique incite. I can't imagine the smell coming from all that sewage. Our water is tested regularly, but I still don't drink it. I buy bottled spring water or filtered water for drinking.

I weighed in on this issue because I always thought that the supply of water on earth could not be used up, much like oil. There is a continuous process where water is cycled between the earth and the atmosphere. It evaporates from water supplies, gets recycled from storm drains and sewers or replenishes aquifers and is returned somewhere else through rain clouds. While there is a finite supply of freshwater, it isn't possible to just use it up. It naturally gets redistributed and recycled.

Over time it all balances out. It may not be exactly where it's needed, at any given time, but it's still there. So conservation is once again a made up, feel good concept, pushed by the liberal mainstream media and pseudoscience that does nothing to preserve the amount of water in general.

Yet another example of naturally occurring "climate change" that man is powerless to alter.
 
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bykfixer

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Thank you for your unique incite. I can't imagine the smell coming from all that sewage. Our water is tested regularly, but I still don't drink it. I buy bottled spring water or filtered water for drinking.

I weighed in on this issue because I always thought that the supply of water on earth could not be used up, much like oil. There is a continuous process where water is cycled between the earth and the atmosphere. It evaporates from water supplies, gets recycled from storm drains and sewers or replenishes aquifers and is returned somewhere else through rain clouds. While there is a finite supply of freshwater, it isn't possible to just use it up. It naturally gets redistributed and recycled.

Over time it all balances out. It may not be exactly where it's needed, at any given time, but it's still there. So conservation is once again a made up, feel good concept, pushed by the liberal mainstream media and pseudoscience that does nothing to preserve the amount of water in general.

Yet another example of naturally occurring "climate change" that man is powerless to alter.
I'm not a tree hugger by any stretch but do try to reduce water use when it hasn't rained lately. The nearby resevior is filled largely by rain runoff. There are some springs that run to the river too but water is removed via municiple system faster than they can fill it. Plus it means a lower water bill.

To say no need to conserve water is like having the fuel tank of your car near E and not giving a crap because somewhere down the road is a filling station.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Not always as simple as conserving water. In San Diego county, Escondido in particular, Lake Hodges needs to be basically replaced. Since it's part of the water storage system and can only be kept at a minimal capacity, all of our saved conserved water in that area gets dumped out through the Lake Hodges spillway and into the sea.

Much of a similar situation in northern CA. Northern CA gets tons of rain and snow in winter and about half of it ends up flowing out to sea. They have avoided projects to reroute water south where it's needed to save a two inch fish, the Delta Smelt.

Now they want to charge people a "tax" on the well water they have rights to. We call that theft.

Water rights laws got changed recently for all the states depending on the Colorado River. Puts caps on what each state can use. Usually the agricultural producers get hosed in these deals and get little to no water for growing crops. Cities (L.A.) have been known to cheat on the rules to use more water for their allotment.

Things like desalinization plants have helped in some areas, but California environmentalists have made this option almost impossible or at least prohibitively expensive to get a project going. They prefer to force test projects on crap to tap programs injecting poor quality water into the systems that then taints the pipes and makes it hard to backtrack on. Governor Newsom has also been working with Oregon to blow up 4 perfectly good dams along the Klamath River. These dams also produced hydroelectric power.

Conserving water doesn't work if it's all sent out to sea, rerouted to others deemed to have stronger water rights than you, you avoid using city water and you get taxed on well water you own, and water storage dams are being blown up for the fish.
 

TPA

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While not to the levels of mismanagement as California and the Colorado River, the Florida Everglades have been turned into a complete disaster by the Army Corps of Engineers over the years. Their more recent "improvements" are somewhat better, but still aren't the right solution...and are causing more damage elsewhere along the system.

By nature, I tend to use less resources than others. I'm not an enviro-weenie, but I am cheap and look at TCO. At one of my condos, the power company accused me of tampering with the meter because I used so little electricity. I think I'm on the 4th meter since I've been there. My central AC uses ~750 watts-850 watts most of the time. I also had a similar issue when I was going to college and the complex didn't think I was using enough water. I had a European washer which used barely anything for water, but 2+ hour long cycles and intense heat (boiling possible) meant it cleaned great.
 
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