G3 Geomagnetic Storm Incoming

Hooked on Fenix

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The sun produced an M4 solar flare directly facing earth from sunspot AR2975. It produced a good sized coronal mass ejection heading toward earth. This caused an S1 radiation storm, caused type II and type IV radio bursts over Africa, and now an incoming moderate G2 class geomagnetic storm predicted on March 31. It could actually be even stronger because the M4 flare was followed shortly by M1 and M2 solar flares with their own coronal mass ejections. Auroras could reach New York and Idaho, possibly even farther south. This could put out a spectacular light show.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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The M1 solar flare behind the M4 was faster. This is going to combine the two on the way producing a cannabal cme. They’re now predicting a G3 solar storm for the night of March 30. On March 28, sunspot AR2975 spit out 11 C class flares and 6 M class flares while directly facing earth. If these flares produced c.m.e.s, it could extend the length of the geomagnetic storm. Don’t be concerned about this being on the scale of a Carrington event. It definitely is not. None of these flares so far are X class. However, they were fairly strong and aimed in our direction. We should see some beautiful auroras out of this event possibly down to the northern parts of the U.S. If you are a frequent flyer, you might want to avoid flying for now due to the radiation risk and potential of radio blackouts (pilots radios might not work well).
 

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Ok, now this may be a bit more of a problem. The same sunspot unleashed an X1.3 solar flare. The cme from it will likely hit pretty hard if it’s on top of a G3 solar storm preceding it. Still no Carrington event, but could potentially cause some damage up north. I’m still hoping it’s just a nice light show from the auroras.
 

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That should help. If the grid goes down, you can live on mustard. Hope you at least have some hot dogs to go with it.
 

Olumin

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I wonder if incandescent lights or LEDs would fare better in a Carrington type scenario? I would imagine incans would be fine since no complex electronics are present. Could a Carrington event make a xenon flashlight bulb blow? Im no expert.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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I wonder if incandescent lights or LEDs would fare better in a Carrington type scenario? I would imagine incans would be fine since no complex electronics are present. Could a Carrington event make a xenon flashlight bulb blow? Im no expert.
The thing to worry about isn’t the l.e.d.s and light bulbs by the end user. It’s the massive transformers that make up the backbone of the grid that take months if not years to replace and sometimes require taking apart bridges to get them to their destinations. These are what are most vulnerable during a Carrington like event that can take as much as years to get the power back up and running in a worst case scenario. But the Carrington event electrocuted telegraph operators working on the lines. It melted wiring. A lot of things would be susceptible unless put in a faraday cage beforehand. If you know it’s about to happen, you could probably unplug your microwave and throw items you wanted protected in it.
 

idleprocess

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The thing to worry about isn’t the l.e.d.s and light bulbs by the end user. It’s the massive transformers that make up the backbone of the grid that take months if not years to replace and sometimes require taking apart bridges to get them to their destinations.
This. The grid is effectively a loooooong antenna to collect electromagnetic fields and transmit induced currents, damaging connected electronics. Devices isolated from the grid are thus limited to whatever local currents the field might induce and thus unlikely to be much impacted, let alone damaged.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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In general, a CME as strong as a Carrington event you need to worry most about the transformers and the grid. An EMP from a nuclear bomb is more likely to take out your smaller electronics, but will also mess up the power grid.
 

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The CME just hit NOAA’s DSCOVR spacecraft. The geomagnetic storm should be starting in a matter of minutes.

correction: It’s here. It hit the atmosphere at 7:10 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (West coast U.S. time).
 
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Hooked on Fenix

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Here is a livestream of the Northern Lights now:

Churchill, Canada:


There was one on youtube of North Dakota but it wouldn't work
 

ampdude

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Good thing I have my incans... LEDs may suffer under a strong solar storm :/
 
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