Green Creative Titanium 4.0 bulbs- anyone tried these?

SemiMan

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80? ...ones I have have 20 and 10. Do you mean die? Those are very small die to get the voltage stack. Much smaller than. 5630 die.

The Philips paddle bulbs have far less than 80.... 26 actually.
 
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SemiMan

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Droop is just one issue. There are limits on phosphor power/area due to heating from Stokes and other losses.

Most suppliers do not list droop as the big hurdle to low costs. 8" silicon substrates could drop those substrate costs but consensus is sapphire is still cheapest.
 

CoveAxe

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Do you mean die?

Yes, I was talking about the die. Even though they are small, they are still expensive with regard to their size. Obviously the industry would prefer to have one 800 lumen die than 50 <20 lumen dies. This cannot be done as of now.

Each 5630 does not have 3 LED die in them

I'm not sure how those packages are able to overcome droop limitations then (maybe larger area to keep the same current density?). I find it hard to believe that a manufacturer like Cree wouldn't make such a LED package if it reduced the amount of substrate.

Droop is just one issue. There are limits on phosphor power/area due to heating from Stokes and other losses.

True, but the cost is much more sensitive to the extra die space than the phosphor at the moment. But seeing as the only currently known ways of solving droop are using even more expensive materials, improving phosphors still remains the easiest way to improve efficiency/lower cost.
 

SemiMan

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You are now clutching at straws. The die in a 5630 is cheap. The package costs as much. Cree is a non player in this market ... Not even worth mentioning. A nobody.

The die in a 5630 is quite cheap and still tolerable margins. Droop is tolerable from 65 to 130ma. Die cost per area are going down and droop is gradually reducing.

Actually optically they are choosing many small die due to easier diffusion. That said small die have better yield.

5630 are typically ran anywhere from 30 to 60 lumens. Efficiency is a concern but also color shift.

Phosphor improvements have little to do with efficiency at this point and more to do with filling holes in LED mfg like high efficiency green phosphors and narrower reds as making these LEDs has proven difficult.
 
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amd20x6

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Recent correspondence I had with TCP:

Q: I'm interested in purchasing some of your 4100k 100W equivalent bulbs. Before I buy, I'd like to know if any of the three models have measurable 120Hz flicker as per IEEE PAR 1789. If so, which model has the least amount? Will I be best off buying the non-dimmable LED15A2141K? Thanks.

A: All may have measurable flicker, If you want one with a dims even with the correct dimmer switch it may cause additional flicker. So the best choice would be to use the LED15A2141K.
 

amd20x6

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I'm attaching a few pictures of some bulbs I have laying around at full brightness. I just received the G7 Power Carlin 4000k bulb.

This is hardly scientific but the banding on the Carlin looks similar to my good Philips bulbs. I think I've found what I'm looking for! I just need twice as many of them...

The perceived flicker of the Utilitech bulbs is much less than that the Green Creative bulbs. Perhaps part of their enclosed fixture rating includes removing all electrolytic capacitors?

Sorry, no pics of the GC bulbs.

Philips 451906 1620lm 2700k
j7ZL2AEm.jpg
Utilitech 596930 1600lm 3000k
k97sxxjm.jpg
G7 Power Carlin 900lm 4000k
u3M2aOGm.jpg
Utilitech 557095 800lm 3000k
VsEiWokm.jpg
Philips 424382 (remote phosphor) 830lm 2700k
BTcJdnKm.jpg
Cree original style 800lm 5000k
NZC8ZlHm.jpg
60W Soft White Incandescent
SMCnVfkm.jpg
100W Soft White Incandescent
MzCuE3qm.jpg
Philips 9290002097 (L-Prize) 940lm 2700k
GpYVPVPm.jpg

 
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idleprocess

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I believe the "cool white" version of the 3M LED bulb was also 4000K, unfortunately a few other members in this forum commented that the 3M bulb had flicker also.

Showed signs of flicker when photographed (banding), so it very likely does flicker. Was also heavy, expensive, and in my case not very reliable.
 

CoveAxe

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Just wanted to ping the thread here so say that I've had these installed in some small enclosed fixture with no ventilation for about 5 months now. I bought some more about 4 months ago and filled the rest of the fixtures.

Even with summer temperatures and being on for ~10 hours a day, they are working just as well as the day I bought them. These have worked out great because these fixtures are very difficult to access so when previous bulbs burned out it would frequently be several months or more before we would replace them. At this point they've already lasted longer than most bulbs we'd use, so it's all just bonus time at this point.
 
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