green leds

Chris M.

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theledlightdefinately has them here- http://theledlight.com/led-specs.html (also blue white and turquoise Nichias, plus Toshiba red orange and yellow), not sure where else you can get them, someone will know.


In the UK if anyone`s interested, Maplin Electronics sell green and blue Nichias in a choice of 2 beam angles, but they cost something like twice what they do from theledlight (before shipping/import tax though). They have the Toshiba ones too, they are more reasonably priced.

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napalm-2002

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do you guys know where i can find those brite green leds in the stylus lite or the lightwave 2000.i'd like to convert a light or two.i like the green for night work.the only draw back is that you cant see the difference in colors.ie wires.
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KenBar

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Please excuse if this is slightly off topic. I did not want to start a new thread just for this question.

I have a question about the green ones. I currently have 2 green...a Photon and a Pal. I was using them a few nights ago to read with to see how it went.

I am trying to decide on which flashlight bulb to get on the NEW ARC LS. I am torn between green and white.

I had read nicely about 30 min in the dark and my daughter came down the hall and turned on the hall light.

EVERYTHING suddenly was tinted pink with my vision. It was quite nice but a little creepy. The green had been extremely pleasant to read with. There did not seem to be as much glare as with white.

My question is ... are there any implications of using a green light OVER TIME that any one is aware of? Military people probably know the answer or a funky ophthalmologist...mabye Craig??
 

The_LED_Museum

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by KenBar:

My question is ... are there any implications of using a green light OVER TIME that any one is aware of? Military people probably know the answer or a funky ophthalmologist...mabye Craig??
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The reaction you experienced is exactly what you should expect when using a green light for a long period. This is perfectly normal, and is no reason for concern.

I'm not an eye expert, so I can't go into specific details as to the actual mechanism responsible for your seeing pink when someone flicks on a light, but it has to do with the way the green light only activates *some* of the color receptors in the eye (green, in this case), so that they never become fully accustomed to darkness. Thus, when someone flicks on a white light, the green receptors, having already been exposed to green light, do not activate as strongly as the others, giving everything a purplish or pinkish tint for a short time.

An expert needs to chime in here if you want SPECIFIC details as to what happens inside the eye. But what I can do is assure you the effect is TEMPORARY and completely innocuous.

FYI: If you use a Blue light for a long period, you'll see everything in a lemon yellow whens someone flicks on a light.
And if you use a Red light in the same manner, you'll see everything in a funky blue-green when someone turns on a light.
 
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**DONOTDELETE**

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KenBar, when your eyes have been exposed to green light only, eyes are much more receptive Red and Blue components of light as compared to Green. This happens because the concentration of the photochemical responsible for the reception of the green light is less than those responsible for reception of red and blue.

Now open MSPaint, go to Colors->EditColors->DefineCustomColors and combine RGB components as following:

Red: 255
Green: 100
Blue: 255

The resulting color is pink.

FYI: for humans, any color can be represented by RGB, because there are three different photochemicals responsible for color recognition. Monkeys, on the other hand, have only two photochemicals in their eyes, so they only need two components to uniquely define a color.
 

RonM

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Some good answers.

I'm not familiar with eye physiology or chemistry, but I do have a theory. The brain and eyes work kind of like a digital camera. The camera when set to "auto white blance" will try to normalize the image it sees so the colors are balanced. Too much yellow from tungstan lamps and the camera adjusts so the picture will look normal. Indoor pics taken with film cameras and no flash always look more yellow than you remember, because film cameras don't have white balance. But when you were in the tungsten lighted room your eyes/brain performed an adjustment so you didn't notice the color imbalance. So in the case of the green flashlight, the eyes/brain have adjusted but when the regular lights come on this adjustment adds a color cast to the room until they readjust.

Just a theory.
 
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Getting off topic, but what the HEY!

If you stare at an image for about one minute, without moving your eyes around, that image will be temporarily "remembered" by the rods and cones on your retina (in your eye).
After the minute, look at a clean white sheet of paper, blink a few times, and you will see the negative image of what you stared at.

Pretty neat, the human machine.
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Quickbeam

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Well, I guess I count as pretty close to an expert for this topic - MS in Education/Biology....

What happened to your eyes is known as "cone pigment bleaching". The cones in your retina use "pigments" (the photochemicals mad_scientist was speaking of) to detect colors. Your retina cones were using the green pigment for a long time and as a result, the cones' green pigment became "bleached" (used up) - as the other colors were not being used, your eye was now more receptive to all colors but green. Since your cones only contain 3 pigments (red, green and blue), you noticed this lack of green as a pink tint in your vision. There are absolutely no long term effects as a result of pigment bleaching, even with bright light. Your retina cones just need some time to restock themselves with pigment.

BTW: Excellent example by mad_scientist using MS Paint! This shows precisely how the RGB colors combine to make the colors we see in the world.
 

KenBar

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Thanks to everyone for great answers...
I wish I had about 3 lives to live to continue to learn more about things.

I still have the original problem of deciding on green or white for the new Arc LS now that it appears no damage is done to the eye. I have really taken a liking to the green light. It seems to be more efficient also...my batteries last longer with the green??
 
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**DONOTDELETE**

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KenBar, cyan (turquoise with Nichia jargon) is just as bright as green, but the color is closer to white. For me, the choice is either green or cyan - white is too inefficient.
 

KenBar

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mad_scientist:
KenBar, cyan (turquoise with Nichia jargon) is just as bright as green, but the color is closer to white. For me, the choice is either green or cyan - white is too inefficient.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Actually you are correct...I was calling it incorrectly. The color I am wanting is Cyan..I checked the web site to make sure.

I think you just made the decision for me!
Thanks Sci man!!


Arc CYAN LS FYI
 
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**DONOTDELETE**

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I think you just made the decision for me!

Think again
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How do you know that you won't grow tired of cyan? Think: every time you switch on the flashlight you will see this cold ugly unnatural color, making you think why the hell didn't you get the white one. On the other hand, white is very natural and neutral - it is impossible to not to like white. It is also more useful than cyan, as it allows color recognition.

Now are you still so enthusiastic about the cyan? If you are torn between the cyan and white, that makes two of us.
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RonM

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I say white is right, and no, I'm not spouting neo-nazi rhetoric.
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Monochromatic LEDs may be efficient in concept but not in real life. A cyan light source shining on everyday objects will result in a lot of light be absorbed. Only objects whose color is cyan or contains a reasonably high percentage of cyan will appear bright. That's the nature of narrow spectrum light sources. A white LED may be electrically less efficient but as a real world illuminator it is considerably more efficient than a monochromatic light.

We live in a world full of many beautiful colors. Use them.

Of course if you want cyan just as a curiosity, then go for it.
 

Badbeams3

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Hi Napalm, you may want to try www.nichia.com (they might be expensive though).
Keep in mind some of the blue green led`s have those nasty bow-tie beams.
 

vcal

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by napalm-2002:
now that you guys have had your fun where the hell can i get some green leds please.
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For the discreet hi-brightness LEDs try: www.bgmicro.com green-#LED1050
cyan-#LED1052 ($2.50ea)
 
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**DONOTDELETE**

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I got my blue-greens from bgmicro today. Its a dog-bone. 10 minutes of filing fixed it though
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I don't know why they are called blue-green. To me they are just as green as the green ones.
 

Chris M.

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now that you guys have had your fun where the hell can i get some green leds please

I already said! First reply to your question before it went all off-topic.

theledlight definately has them here- http://theledlight.com/led-specs.html (also blue white and turquoise Nichias, plus Toshiba red orange and yellow), not sure where else you can get them, someone will know.

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The_LED_Museum

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mad_scientist:
I got my blue-greens from bgmicro today. Its a dog-bone. 10 minutes of filing fixed it though
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I don't know why they are called blue-green. To me they are just as green as the green ones.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yours must be the exception to the rule.
Mine have all been truly blue-green, becoming more of a cyan or sky blue color when driven considerably harder than normal.

Green Nichia LEDs can have a wavelength range from 520 to 530nm.
Blue-green has a range of 495-505nm.
 
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