Have you chosen one brand's power-tools platform?

Monocrom

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Ryobi is also the only one to make a real commitment to keeping old batteries future compatible w/ new models.
People like to dog on Ryobi, but they're a solid, sensible choice for a lot of people and make a good product.
Must admit, the backwards compatibility is a nice aspect of the brand.
 

Monocrom

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My only issue with the trimmer is I'm unable to edge with it. Having the motor placed at the business end makes it impossible for me to see what needs to be done. The few times I tried, it L@@Ked like Stevie Wonder did them.
Ironically, the Ryobi version has a handful of different attachments for their trimmer you can buy separately.... including an edger.
 
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+

That ladder is awesome Chance!:love:
Yes, it is. I don't know why it took me so long to purchase one.
It's 55" x 14"
Raises to 20" or 30"
The ability to widen and narrow the feet is great on uneven ground.

It's great for cleaning, painting, and pruning. It's a real labor-saving platform not having to move a ladder so often.

Came in handy yesterday taking the top off our hedge.
IMG_5852.JPG
 

bykfixer

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I'm a Milwaukee guy now. They are expensive but they can take the abuse. I found their batteries have a life span far longer than any other brand. I'm still using 12v 2amp batteries I purchased in 2009. They also have the largest selection of tools.

I used to use Dewalt but the batteries never lasted more than a few years and the drills burnt out. My M12 drill outperforms the Dewalt 20V every time.
I have an M12 drill that has been great for over a decade.
Other battery tools are Ryobi due to the tool exchange ability. Mostly 18 volt but for heavy chores the 40 volt battery gets it done like gasoline powered tools used to.
 

bykfixer

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My only issue with the trimmer is I'm unable to edge with it. Having the motor placed at the business end makes it impossible for me to see what needs to be done. The few times I tried, it L@@Ked like Stevie Wonder did them.
Try holding and using it like you would a guitar and walk sideways as you trim.

Find a test spot and take note where the outter edge of its cutting path.

Practice, practice, practice.
 

orbital

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Yes, it is. I don't know why it took me so long to purchase one.
It's 55" x 14"
Raises to 20" or 30"
The ability to widen and narrow the feet is great on uneven ground.

It's great for cleaning, painting, and pruning. It's a real labor-saving platform not having to move a ladder so often.

Came in handy yesterday taking the top off our hedge.
+

Can I ask what you paid for it?
That one you can only get at HD
 

jabe1

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Milwaukee. I think I have close to 20 different tools now. Some batteries are well over 10 years old, and many of the tools are used multiple times weekly.
I used to buy Porter Cable until Black and Decker bought and reined them.
 

Monocrom

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It really is unfortunate what happened to Porter Cable.
I think B&D made a huge mistake in basically de-valuing that brand.
 

ghostguy6

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As far as selection, I think Ryobi has Milwaukee beat on that one aspect. Still amazes me that both brands belong to the same parent company though.
I would have to say last time I looked Ryobi was catering more towards the average home owner while Milwaukee was targeting the professional market. I'm more into the professional line often requiring specialty tools. I just found the Ryobi wasnt up to the task as well as the Milwaukee is.
The 18650s inside any battery pack are probably the same.
Plenty of Youtube video's showing the difference. You really get what you pay for with the higher end brands when it comes to cells.
 

Monocrom

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Ryobi is trying to break into the professional/contractor market.
But, blatant honesty.... They're falling short with most of their offerings.
Definitely a DIY/Homeowner market brand. (Though their new SPEED BENCH mobile workstation is stirring up quite a fuss lately.)
 

RCantor

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I became a homeowner 30 years ago and needed a weed eater. Having lung problems made gas tools, especially 2 cycle engines, a bad choice for me. Ryobi came out with a very expensive 4 cycle engine weed eater. I bought it, used it (Worked well), prepped it for the winter as instructed, and it wouldn't work in the Spring. So I never buy Ryobi although I hear it's better now.

When I needed a battery chainsaw Oregon was the only one on the market. It's been great although heavy and bulky. There was a deal on the Oregon weed eater so I got that. Just like my corded Stihl the engine was great but the head was terrible. I decided to go with another weed eater, paying more attention to the head. Makita was the only one with a standard, professional spindle thread so it could take attachments. Horrifically expensive but the best purchase. It will take and run all kinds of brush eating attachments with ease. The 2 18 V batteries last well. It came with 2 extra free batteries (4 total) plus charger. I can charge 2 and run 2 repeatedly with no down time. I brush hog more than I weed eat.

I also needed a drill that could run a 2.5" fostner bit through hardwood stumps. Corded drills (rented from Home Despot) couldn't do it but the highest advertised torque on any drill was the makita 18 V. I bought it and it effortlessly made a 1" deep hole. I was hooked until I needed to drill some self tapping tek screws. My Makita drill couldn't do it. It was either too slow and they wouldn't bite or too fast and they melted. My co-workers let me borrow the 2 tools that did it successfully - a Milwaukee and a DeWalt impact driver (No Makita available to try). I liked the general offerings of DeWalt better and it was easier to use so I went with that. A few years later I was glad I did because when I needed an electric pruner the DeWalt was the best of breed for less than 1/3rd the price of the Makita offering. If I had to buy a chainsaw again I'd probably go with DeWalt or Makita but so far the Oregon is doing fine.
 

PaladinNO

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For cordless tools, I started out with a single Bosch Green 14,4V drill, then an 18V. Then I needed some actual drill power and went with a Makita 18V drill.
Prices and availability put a quick stop to further Makita purchases, so I landed on Dewalt 18V. Supplemented by 230V tools of various brands.

Best part about Dewalt:
Reasonably reasonable prices. Mostly good quality and power for the money. Tools are well balanced, feels good in the hands to hold over time, and feels well built.

Worst part about Dewalt:
Questionable quality for their drill/driver chucks. I have had issues with wobble in the chuck on all 3 of my drills (DCD991, DCD796 and DCF601). And I've heard similar stories about their impact series, such as the DCF887, which was long on my wishlist.

I'm not a professional in any way, I just like to have everything I need or might need on hand. "Excessive homeowner" is perhaps my best description.

Current tool collection is this (got some inherited older tools as well, but these I have purchased myself):
Dewalt DCD991 - drill, 18V
Dewalt DCD796 - "hammer" drill, 18V
Dewalt DCF899 - impact wrench, 18V
Dewalt DCF601 - driver, 12V
Dewalt DW343K - jigsaw, 230V
Dewalt DWE6411 - sheet sander, 230V
Makita SP6000J - plunge saw, 230V
Hitachi (Hikoki) C8FSE - sliding miter saw, 230V
Metabo SXE 425 Turbo - orbital sander, 230V
Black & Decker KG2000 - 230mm angle grinder, 230V
Metabo WEV 11-125 125mm angle grinder, 230V
Stanley D200/8/24 - compressor, 230V
Dremel 4000 - multitool, 230V
Karcher WD6 P Premium - vacuum cleaner, 230V

With my latest aquisition being this:
Bosch GST 160 CE - jigsaw, 230V
I've found myself using a jigsaw a lot lately, so I wanted to get the best one I could get my hands on.

On my wishlist:
Dewalt DCF922 - compact impact wrench, 18V (will replace the DCD796 drill)

Accessories:
2x Makita MakPac 1
8x Makita MakPac 2
1x Makita MakPac 4
Makita 199141-8 - guide rail for the plunge saw
Makita 194385-5 - guide rail clamps
2x Dewalt DCB184 - 5 Ah batteries
2x Dewalt DCBP034 - 1,7Ah Powerstack batteries
Ear plugs in every MakPac carry case, in case I don't have full size hearing protectors available.
Big box with various screw cases
A lot of spare sander sheets
Plenty of bit sets, especially the Dewalt DT70734T FlexTorq
Several Dewalt DW2547IR and Dewalt DT7508 socket / hex-adapters
Bahco 7806 17mm, 19mm and 21mm impact sockets
Bahco BH13000 jack
Bahco BH33000 jack stands
Bahco S910 socket set
Several Bahco 808050 screwdrivers

I find it a bit ironic that I started out with Makita as the "professional" choice, and ended up using only their carry cases.
But the Makita MakPac series is SO handy! Choose a case size, get the insert you need for your tool, almost regardless of brand, and you can fit the tool AND any accessories you might need! Such as measuring tape, ear plugs, drill bits, driver bits, adapters etc. The cases also stack, and can be locked together.

Much better than Bosch or Dewalt's solutions, where you can fit the tool, battery and charger...and that is it.
 
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alpg88

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It is hard to get all tools from single brand, Some brands make certain tools better than others, I used to have dewalt only, then I needed small shop vac, milwaukee made a better one than dewalt, so I got it. At first I thought i'd be ok with battery adapter, and run milwaukee vac with dewalt batteries, it worked, than I needed a 6in angle grinder, milwaukee was a better choice, so i got one, but adapter could not handle the load of the grinder, so I got m18 batteries with charger. than I needed 1/2 impact wrench, milwaukee again was a better tool, so I got it, then I needed 120v inverter, only Milwaukee made one the the time. then I got heated jacket from milwaukee running on m12 batteries. so now I have about a dozen of tools, or more from dewalt and milwaukee.
 

RCantor

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It is hard to get all tools from single brand, Some brands make certain tools better than others, I used to have dewalt only, then I needed small shop vac, milwaukee made a better one than dewalt, so I got it. At first I thought i'd be ok with battery adapter, and run milwaukee vac with dewalt batteries, it worked, than I needed a 6in angle grinder, milwaukee was a better choice, so i got one, but adapter could not handle the load of the grinder, so I got m18 batteries with charger. than I needed 1/2 impact wrench, milwaukee again was a better tool, so I got it, then I needed 120v inverter, only Milwaukee made one the the time. then I got heated jacket from milwaukee running on m12 batteries. so now I have about a dozen of tools, or more from dewalt and milwaukee.

I'm just starting to look at cordless angle grinders. What makes the Milwaukee better? Thanks.
 
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