Have you chosen one brand's power-tools platform?

alpg88

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I'm just starting to look at angle grinders. What makes the Milwaukee better? Thanks.
Power/price. DEwalt comparable 6in grinder is 60v model and costs more, needs 20/60v batteries/compatible chargers. If you compare side by side 20v 5in dewalt and 18v 6in milwaukee, the latter wins hands down. there are videos on several youtube channels comparing them, as well as other brands. there may be others that are better than milwaukee overall, but I was only comparing dewalt and milwaukee cordless tools. Have no idea which corded tool is better.
 
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Monocrom

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Why would anyone try to steal Ryobi? Lol?
As you can see from the end of the short clip.... Someone did open up a Ryobi box. Maybe they were checking for fit in hand. Most likely to steal a battery. From a box clearly labeled tool-ONLY. In fairness, Ryobi batteries are surprisingly expensive. Especially the One+ ones.
 

iacchus

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For angle grinders, both Makita and Bosch use x-lock connections now. If you like that, they're great. If you hate that, avoid those two brands.
I like it now. Not so much at first. Had to get used to it to see the design advantages. Also, had to get a back stock of discs built up.
Both Bosch and Makita make some real solid angle grinders, though.
 
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That is a gorgeous hedge, by the way. :love:
Thank you, Sir. I took a little off the top today.

IMG_5855.JPG

For this pruning, I used the WeWALT cordless on the side. The hedge is so wide the top requires an extra-long IC trimmer.

Another cordless DeWALT tool I've never regretted purchasing is this pole saw.

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Monocrom

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For angle grinders, both Makita and Bosch use x-lock connections now. If you like that, they're great. If you hate that, avoid those two brands.
I like it now. Not so much at first. Had to get used to it to see the design advantages. Also, had to get a back stock of discs built up.
Both Bosch and Makita make some real solid angle grinders, though.
Bit off-topic, but I do like the corded Porter Cable angle grinder.
Nothing specific I can point too. Just something about it I really like.
One of the few Porter Cable power-tools Black & Decker apparently left alone. Don't think anyone nowadays would pick Porter Cable to standardize on.
 

Monocrom

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I e got some older Porter Cable corded stuff about. Probably manufactured when I was in short pants. Still runs fine.

I have no experience with their modern wares, but they were absolute quality at one time.
Exactly! That's what kills me. Rock-solid, quality brand, well-known in America for decades.... De-valued for some unknown reason by the partnership of Stanley Black & Decker as the parent company that acquired it. Usual nonsense likely given of "Not reaching sales goals."

Well, how about you pump it up with some marketing? Maybe concentrate on the company's heritage in America. Get the word out. Maybe put some quality into the newer cordless power-tools that you've given the Porter Cable name to. I just don't get it.

Then again, I'm not a businessman. But crazy me, what do I know? I don't see the benefit of de-valuing something that a business has acquired. Something that once had immense name recognition. Something that once was very profitable, and could be again with the proper marketing. Or, pivot the brand. Make it something that could fill a hole in your corporate power-tool collection of brands. There are so many segments of the power-tool industry. Everything from mildly-used Home DIY, to DIY Pro who routinely uses his tools year round, to Contractor Grade, etc. Slot it in as a competitor to another, different, parent company's power-tool brand. Or, just sell it off based on name recognition to some other company that might actually do something with it.

But apparently keeping it, de-valuing it intentionally, reducing profits from that brand is somehow sound business strategy? That can't be right.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Used to do electrical work. When I started working for my Dad a long time ago, I started with a large Ryobi kit. Worked okay starting out. Then added a Ridgid drill for more power. Then got a 18 volt Makita drill for lighter tasks. After working for my Dad, and then later starting in an apprenticeship program, The NiCd batteries on the Ryobi tools were shot and the tools were too slow to get the job done and stay employed. The Ridgid NiMH batteries weren't holding a charge well and the one compact lithium ion Makita battery was getting used as fast as I could charge it. Got a deal on a Ridgid 12 volt impact driver with two batteries for $50. That helped. Then ended up getting more Ridgid 18 volt tools when the Gen5x kits came out with permanent magnet motors. Then I needed lights. Started with a Ryobi corded/cordless 1700 lumen 18 volt light. Then I started getting shipped off to jobs where I had to camp during the week near work and drive home on the weekends, so I got Milwaukee's 12 and 18 volt lanterns for duel use. Tools started getting heavy with multiple platforms, batteries, and chargers. Having to pack tools and camping gear in a car to get by for a week at a time made standardizing on one platform to save weight and space more necessary. Ended up settling on Milwaukee. Battery charger worked with 12 and 18 volt batteries. For 12 volt, I had a brushless impact driver, brushless hammer drill, Sawzall, lantern, and one handed bandsaw. For 18 volt, I had a drill, lantern, metal cutting skill saw and 3000 lumen floodlight. For heavy tasks, I got into my 18 volt Ridgid tools for the hammer drill, Sawzall, impact driver, and skill saw. Most electrical tasks require your tools to be light and squeeze in small spaces so most of the time, just the Milwaukee tools would do unless drilling big holes, cutting large wood or metal, or sinking large bolts or screws.
 

vicv

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As you can see from the end of the short clip.... Someone did open up a Ryobi box. Maybe they were checking for fit in hand. Most likely to steal a battery. From a box clearly labeled tool-ONLY. In fairness, Ryobi batteries are surprisingly expensive. Especially the One+ ones.
I know I was kidding. Ryobi are pretty good. Better than ridged
 

Poppy

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I had a 12V Ryobi drill that I was pleased with. When the NiCad battery didn't hold a charge anymore, I considered going to the 18V format, but decided to stay with the 12V (so the battery could be used for other 12V applications in the event of an outage.) I bought a replacement battery. When that wouldn't hold a charge anymore, I decided to go LiIon 18V.

It wasn't a tough decision, to stay with Ryobi. They were on display at the local Home Depot, and there was a large selection of One+ tools available. The prices were less than the "commercial" brands, and I was satisfied with my 12V unit.

Recently, the last few years, Ryobi has added more commercial applications to their line-up of available tools. This makes me happy, because I have an investment in a number of their 18V batteries. For example, a friend/plumber did some work at my house and used a Milwaukee Force Logic Press tool to crimp Pro Press fittings, I was impressed with the ease at which they were used. I was disappointed that Ryobi didn't make that kind of professional tool. That made we wonder if I made a mistake by going the Ryobi route.

But now I see that they did move into the more professional tool line.

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PaladinNO

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Ryobi is trying to break into the professional/contractor market.
But, blatant honesty.... They're falling short with most of their offerings.
Ryobi can try all they want, I ain't touching their tools again.

Tried twice, with a Ryobi jigsaw and an orbital sander.
With the jigsaw, the blade mount was constantly slipping to the point where it was literally smoking. There was no risk of the blade falling out, as it had a lock, but the blade was attached too loosely and rubbing against the mount every time it went up and down during use, generating heat.

The Ryobi sander was actually dangerous. I received it, I unboxed it, I placed a sheet on the pad and started using it. After about 30 seconds, the disc flew off. And fortunately away from me. And I'm not talking about the sanding sheet separating from the velcro, I'm talking about the whole pad that is screwed to the sander coming undone, without warning, and flying off.

I placed the disk back on, tightened the screw to the breaking point...and it flew off a second time a minute later. I did not try it a third time.
The sander went back into the box, I contacted the E-tailer for a return and a refund, explaining what had happened. Got my money back without questions, and I got a call the next day from a senior manager, asking if there was any injuries. Fortunately there was none - the disk flew away from me both times. The sander was off their site within a week later.

These were both older models, before the current Ryobi One+series was a thing, so they may be better now. But I won't be one to find out.

EDIT:
Bought the Ryobi sander because it was relatively cheap (same story with the jigsaw), but I eventually paid the extra premium for the Metabo SXE 425. Haven't had a single issue with the SXE 425. It's what I used for 2 weeks when I sanded down all 4 sides of the 18x 2"x4" parts my current desk now consists of.

And this is why I am no longer skimping on my tools, or buying no-name brands regardless of how many or how few times I expect to use a new tool. Paying for quality tools is a worthwhile investment.
 
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JAS

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I am in two different systems right now.

I needed a string trimmer a few years back. I went with the Ryobi 40 volt system. I have since purchased a Ryobi 18 inch chain saw, lawn mower, power inverter and pole saw.

My other system in Milwaukee M12. I started with a heated hooded sweatshirt for my wife. We have since purchased additional heated gear, a mini chainsaw, tire inflator, pruning shears and a drill.

Milwaukee is clearly better quality from what I have seen. As much as it might be nice to have everything in one eco-system, that would not be possible for me, yet.
 

orbital

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+
I'm just starting to look at angle grinders. What makes the Milwaukee better? Thanks.
+

When I was having my new well put in (nightmare situation) I was sitting on a step changing out my grinder wheel for a cut-off wheel on my DeWalt angle grinder.
Very good family operation who I as working with
One of the two brothers putting in the well said "I have that exact grinder"
I said "it works well" ,,, he said "it does"

that's it (y)
 

Rossymeister

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Stay away from Kobalt. I bought 2 tire inflators to put in each vehicle, and they both quit working within a year. Pure junk.
 

alpg88

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I'd say stay away from any store brand, for serious work, kobalts is lowe's brand, husky hdx HD brand, (thou they do not make power tools) store brands are basically lowest bidder manufacturer that puts store name on it.
 

KITROBASKIN

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Glad to see this thread.

Store in Albuquerque (Territorial) is where I previously ordered a corded Makita drill (not hammer drill). Based on advice here on good ole' CPF, looking to get a reciprocating saw (tree thinning mostly) and the Makita GRJ02 40V is the One in spite of steep battery expense. Looking at other tools in the XGT realm.

Sales person at Territorial can give me prices a little lower than Big Box. He says new promotions should come out this summer. Willing to drop significant money to get a combo that is right.

There is a compact neutral light source with a warm adapter that fits the XGT battery (yeah expensive, $50 something) that has a USB port on it (ML011G).

Would like to get the fluid pump (PF400MP) that connects to Couple Shaft Power Heads. Then there are the microwave and hot water heater. Maybe other platforms have these crazy expensive, not necessarily practical fun things? Too bad so much Makita is made in a less than preferred country now days.
 

alpg88

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If you already have makita tools and 18v batteries, there is makita sawzall that uses 2 18v batteries, same stroke length, same spm. as 40v. If not than might as well get 40v, one of 40v model has orbital motion too.
 
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