Have you chosen one brand's power-tools platform?

PaladinNO

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Something akin to the plastic case pictured on the right side of the picture as opposed to the cardboard box the last three tools I purchased came in.
Got it. According to DeWalt's nomenclature (not a word I have ever used before), you get a case included if the tool has a T at the end. If it doesn't, it's either nothing or a cardboard box.

The nailer would be (at least for me, I don't know if DeWalt also has different names in different markets) DCN680NT. No battery, with a TSTAK case.

Found a handy list here:


Gotta say though, from a quick search, DeWalt USA seems really cheap on including a case with their tool only / no battery listings. :/
I got a stack of 6 DeWalt cases that I don't need included with my tools. And more often than not, the tool - even when it's tool only - that comes with a TSTAK case, is cheaper than the one sent in a cardboard box.

My DCF899NT came like this:

1717359653036.jpeg


EDIT:
Fine, fine...I'll post a photo of my TSTAK stack when my lazy butt gets the DSLR battery over to the charger. xD
My Nokia 3720 doesn't take the best pics - unless I'm printing stamps.
 
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Monocrom

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Anyone with experience using Atlas/Harbor Freight stuff? I used a battery chainsaw and a very handy battery pole saw yesterday.
Honestly, anything from Harbor Freight that is referred to as a "power-tool" is best avoided. Regardless of whichever in-house brand name happens to be on it.
 

SYZYGY

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I didn't make it through yet, but saw this is new on Youtube.



the Ceenr PDNation is interesting, but i think the biggest thing missing from tool batteries (aside from cross compatibility) is storage mode.

having it charge with usbc is a missed opportunity for that. if they had their own charger, that could have power dissipation capability to discharge to 50% SoC.

tons of people go for long stretches of time without using their batteries.

another approach is to do the DJI thing and have the batteries slowly dissipate through an internal load to 50% SoC if they're not used for a while.

imo they really SHOULD do that, and there should be a switch on the side of the battery to disable the feature. or a series of presses to the voltage check button to toggle it.
 
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divine

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Unfortunately, I see less and less of the Made in USA DeWalt tools each time I visit Home Depot. But it's good to see there are some still made here.
I wanted to buy my Dad a "Made in USA" hammer about 20 years ago. I went to Home Depot and Lowes and I think one of those two stores had zero made in USA and the other only had one. I don't remember if I was looking for one with a wooden handle or not. Today, I think both would carry an Estwing. I'll have to look to see what the current status of that situation is.

Anyone with experience using Atlas/Harbor Freight stuff? I used a battery chainsaw and a very handy battery pole saw yesterday.
I own a few of their tools. I have the Hercules Impact Driver because it rated so well on Torque Test Channel, I got a $30 Hercules drill to go with it. I got a Bauer 3/8" impact wrench, battery and charger for $20 at an Estate sale. I got the Ultra Torque 1/2". I've probably only driven 20 or 30 screws with the impact driver. I usually use mode 2 so I don't drive the screws too deep.
 

Poppy

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Anyone with experience using Atlas/Harbor Freight stuff? I used a battery chainsaw and a very handy battery pole saw yesterday.
Harbor freight is promoting their Atlas line as Professional grade.

My nephew teaches a shop class in high school. A few years back he commented to me that he felt "The Harbor Freight tools aren't that bad, but are actually pretty good" He went on to explain a couple of reasons, which I don't recall. Maybe the brushes are easy to replace in the brushed power tools.

I do have a couple of their corded power tools, and have not had any issues with them, but they have not been put through a lot of use, so I can't comment on their durability.

I suspect that pretty much, All manufacturers employ obsolescence engineers these days. So I'll be interested in a finding of where, the Atlas brand holds up, compared to its competitors. Yes, admittedly only mildly interested, because as I said, my power tools actually get little use, and I'm getting to the point in my life, where I'd rather watch someone work, than do it myself. ;)
 

letschat7

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I wanted to buy my Dad a "Made in USA" hammer about 20 years ago. I went to Home Depot and Lowes and I think one of those two stores had zero made in USA and the other only had one. I don't remember if I was looking for one with a wooden handle or not. Today, I think both would carry an Estwing. I'll have to look to see what the current status of that situation is.
20 years ago it was really hard to find USA made tools in a box store or hardware shop that wasn't new old stock.

When I was a kid and young teen it didn't take me long to notice when a tool broke it would be the Chinese one and that my grandfather's tools had lasted decades and they would be marked with a U.S.A typically. Of course anytime I needed something a tool cost a small fortune at True Value so I didn't have much.

When I studied a trade at some point the study books mentioned to get a tool box and buy some basic hand tools. Sears was a great place back then for new manufacture USA tools but I would have to dig through inventory on pegs to get an older pair of USA made Irwin vicegrips or a drill bit. I shopped everywhere in the region at small hardware stores to buy everything I needed and would even go to flea markets or pawn shops and sometimes buy used.

When it seemed to be nearly impossible to source USA tools, especially powertools I switched to buying European. It was kinda hard not to when I could get nearly any powertool I wanted made in Switzerland from the local Lowes and I had an independent tool truck in the UK willing to sell to me over internet. Woodcraft which may be only a West Virginia thing was great to shop at if money isn't an option and was a Festool dealer but I never went that extreme. Hilti was even willing to sell to me and they have a truck in my area but Bosch covered all my needs cheaply back then.

Now I sell tools and can source some USA stuff. Home Depot, Lowes, True Value, and others carry more USA or EU tools nowadays and the situation is better. I'd rather spend a lot and get something good than save money and have a cheap import fail me when I do work with tools.

My customers like the idea of buying USA but balk at the prices typically. I've only once upsold a Dewalt because it was made domestically. The lower end ones fly off the shelfs though.

Here is a USA hammer I bought recently.
 

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Monocrom

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the Ceenr PDNation is interesting, but i think the biggest thing missing from tool batteries (aside from cross compatibility) is storage mode.

having it charge with usbc is a missed opportunity for that.....
Unfortunately, if you want power-tool batteries that are USB-C rechargeable, nowadays we're stuck with mostly cheap Off-brand models. And, the tools themselves aren't remotely powerful.
 

letschat7

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Why don't you just use a 10,000 lumen light that uses Dewalt, Makita, or Milwaukee powertool batteries? That way you are getting some use out of your batteries on a regular basis.
 

Monocrom

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Why don't you just use a 10,000 lumen light that uses Dewalt, Makita, or Milwaukee powertool batteries? That way you are getting some use out of your batteries on a regular basis.
Power-tool lights that use bigger batteries, tend to be too big (even for me) for EDC purposes.
 

Monocrom

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I could see that being useful in a log-cabin out in the woods. During an emergency Blackout situation. Or in a cheap apartment without electricity. And, obviously as an area work-light.
 

sween1911

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I have managed to standardize for outdoor tools. Across my string trimmer, hedge trimmer, and leaf blower are all "EGO" brand and they all share the same rechargeable battery.
 

ghostguy6

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I have one of those large Dewalt Toughsystem boxes and the moulded plastic hinge broke off the first day I used it. The Dewalt service center wouldn't warranty it because anything related to the hinge was considered to be normal wear. It literally didn't even last 24 hours! Yet the superglue I used to fix it has held on about 4 years now.

These days I honestly don't think made in USA means much anymore. In many cases it is more of a marketing ploy, meaning assembled in the USA with parts from other countries. In fact some other countries have really stepped up their game when it comes to manufacturing hand tools. Germany, Switzerland, Japan and even Taiwan produce some top quality tools.
 

Monocrom

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I have one of those large Dewalt Toughsystem boxes and the moulded plastic hinge broke off the first day I used it. The Dewalt service center wouldn't warranty it because anything related to the hinge was considered to be normal wear. It literally didn't even last 24 hours! Yet the superglue I used to fix it has held on about 4 years now.

These days I honestly don't think made in USA means much anymore. In many cases it is more of a marketing ploy, meaning assembled in the USA with parts from other countries. In fact some other countries have really stepped up their game when it comes to manufacturing hand tools. Germany, Switzerland, Japan and even Taiwan produce some top quality tools.
There's laws in place. "Made in the USA" has to be just that, to carry that label. Companies face massive fines for using that label when it's not true. Unfortunately there's a very easy way around that. And, it is indeed using the "Assembled in USA" label. That one carries no legal consequences if a company lied about its use. It's basically meaningless.
 

ghostguy6

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But are they lying if one part is made in the US and the other 99 are from China? There are loop holes to everything these days. Just because it was made in the US doesn't necessarily mean it was made to any particular standard. If you actually read the fine print on some of the tool manufacturer's publication they will say " tested to standard XXX-XXXXXXX" but they wont actually use the word "Passed" It just looks good on paper because they know the average person wont bother to look it up. Lots of manufacturer's use the words "Certified Tough" but wont actually say what they did to test its toughness.
Let's take MIL-STD 801G for example. In order to get that accreditation it only needs to actually pass one of the testes listed. There is a 804 page document listing all the definitions and guidelines so it looks fancy but it reality it boils down to "we tested it for something and it passed but don't have to tell you what we tested it for"
 

Monocrom

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It just has to be Made in the USA to legally qualify for that moniker.
No one said anything about standards. That's the thing....
I've bought items Made in China that were legit better quality, lasted longer than items that were proudly "Made in USA."
 

borrower

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What I have noticed with many of the contractors I deal with is they start with the Dewalt but end up going to Milwaukee. I was the same way. Dewalt was cheaper to purchase but by the time you factored in the cost of new batteries every year or 2 Milwaukee was cheaper in the long run. So far I have only written off one Milwaukee battery in the 15 years I have used them.
...
Not to diminish your experiences, but I'm a working carpenter and I'm only now just seeing my 2016 vintage 2Ah batteries start to underperform and the 2016 5Ah batteries are still doing fine. (I have about 6 of each in circulation.) I don't go out of my way to baby them.

Now, it's possible that the 1.7Ah batteries that come with the low-end Dewalts are, in fact, going to die in a year or two. Dunno. There is clearly a tiered approach to the tools, so it wouldn't surprise me if there was the same approach to batteries.

Regarding warranty, Dewalt has been pretty reasonable. One of my flexvolts died prematurely (ie, inside the 3 year warranty), and they replaced it without any fuss. My oscillating tool trigger lockout failed and they sent a whole new tool without me asking for it.
 

divine

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When I was a kid and young teen it didn't take me long to notice when a tool broke it would be the Chinese one and that my grandfather's tools had lasted decades and they would be marked with a U.S.A typically. Of course anytime I needed something a tool cost a small fortune at True Value so I didn't have much.
I agree, but I don't know that all made in China is bad quality. I do agree that a LOT of them are terrible. I like hanging out on the Spyderco forum and it's pretty interesting to see how they work with their China factory.

When I studied a trade at some point the study books mentioned to get a tool box and buy some basic hand tools. Sears was a great place back then for new manufacture USA tools but I would have to dig through inventory on pegs to get an older pair of USA made Irwin vicegrips or a drill bit. I shopped everywhere in the region at small hardware stores to buy everything I needed and would even go to flea markets or pawn shops and sometimes buy used.
Craftsman makes some good quality stuff. You and I are pretty similar. I go to garage sales, flea markets, and estate sales. I really get some good deals on Craftsman stuff. Project Farm says Irwin usually punches above their price point. I like Kobalt(Lowes) with their warranty, too.

My customers like the idea of buying USA but balk at the prices typically. I've only once upsold a Dewalt because it was made domestically. The lower end ones fly off the shelfs though.
Anymore, I can see balking at USA prices. I usually watch people test a bunch of brands and buy whoever performs well for a reasonable price.

Here is a USA hammer I bought recently.
Agree, I did mention Estwing! I have one from maybe more than 5 years ago that hasn't seen much use that looks pretty similar. I bought probably the oldest Estwing I've ever seen at a garage sale. I'll have to get you a photo of that one.
 

Monocrom

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I'm done watching tool review comparisons on YouTube where they take a cheap brand new power-tool, then compare it to something like a Makita, Milwaukee, or one of the higher-end DeWALT models.

It is so disgustingly misleading. The guys making those type of comparison videos know full well that cheap budget power-tools work great.... When they're brand new! A year down the road, that bargain-basement priced drill is going to be in a landfill. Meanwhile a tool from any of the above named three is going to easily be going strong.

Yes, there are warranties. But the trend seems to be emphasis on the low price. Every shill reviewer on YouTube is raving about the latest Harbor Freight impact driver from their Hercules brand as being a fantastic value with great performance. But look closely and what you get is only a 90-Day Warranty on those Hercules tools. Way to stand behind their products. Sadly, I can see this trend becoming common with the Lowest tier power-tools out there.
 

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