HDS HDS Systems #23

WarriorOfLight

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
1,642
Location
In the middle of Europe
Is a showel a special German invention for comparing a large number of HDS flashlights? 😉
It is not Special German, but in my case I will hande a lot HDS lights for this compare. I do not know if you know my wooden bowl (it is posted somewhere in the HDS section). It is full since years, therfore I need something larger... ;)
 
Last edited:

Kalsu

Newly Enlightened
CPF Supporter
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
178
I have an older EDC Clicky and am trying to figure out what LED it has. I get that it is an XPG. What does the HC and numbers mean? It is a very warm (I would say around 3000k) light. One of my all time favorite lights.

H0sPKLQ.jpg
 

Hogokansatsukan

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Aug 14, 2006
Messages
5,176
Location
Tucson
Since we got another light in with fried electronics from an emitter swap, I thought I would bring this up again as it is a costly problem and happens far too often.
While HDS does move at the speed of light (if Light is the name of a mummified tortoise buried under the Egyptian sands) we do eventually get most emitters as an option that folks request... it just takes a lot of patience.

From the HDS FAQ:
Your flashlight was not designed to be modified after it has been assembled. To make your flashlight as reliable as possible, all connections are soldered together and all of the electronics have been potted. This seals the electronics and makes your flashlight very rugged. There is no safe or cost effective way to swap LEDs.

The LED board is thermally, electrically and mechanically joined to the power supply as well as the metal superstructure. Thus, there is no good way to remove the LED board or otherwise modify it. Getting the LED board hot enough to melt the solder holding the LED to the board requires getting the whole head to the melting point of solder, which takes a lot of time and a lot of heat and will easily exceed the thermal ratings on all of the parts in the power supply, not to mention the LED itself. A broken light is the typical result.

Many people have tried to replace the LED on their light and have destroyed the power supply in the process. If you break the power supply, it will cost you the current price of a head less the cost of the reflector assembly to replace it. Even skilled modders have paid for new power supplies. So don't try to modify your light.

The least expensive way to upgrade the LED in your flashlight is to sell your flashlight on the used market and then purchase a new one. Our lights retain their value even after they have been well used and so there is a thriving used market for our flashlights. This is a testament to how durable our flashlights are and how good our warranty service is.

Or consider gifting your old flashlight to a family member or one of your friends.
 

neco

Enlightened
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
201
Location
Hong Kong
It could be. It seems warmer than 3700k. To me it is more 3000k to 2700k.
Should be 3700k. Looks the same as the one I have. Mine is also warmer than the NB35 I have, considerably so. Agree around 3000k or maybe even warmer. Attaching photo of my light’s LED for reference.
 

Attachments

  • B5EC8420-179D-451A-811B-AF44D9D03994.jpeg
    B5EC8420-179D-451A-811B-AF44D9D03994.jpeg
    173.3 KB · Views: 28

Kalsu

Newly Enlightened
CPF Supporter
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
178
Should be 3700k. Looks the same as the one I have. Mine is also warmer than the NB35 I have, considerably so. Agree around 3000k or maybe even warmer. Attaching photo of my light’s LED for reference.

I wouldn't have guessed 3700k. Thanks for the information. Is yours 120 lumens (green ring) as well?
 

kerneldrop

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 24, 2021
Messages
1,836
Location
South
The LED board is thermally, electrically and mechanically joined to the power supply as well as the metal superstructure. Thus, there is no good way to remove the LED board or otherwise modify it. Getting the LED board hot enough to melt the solder holding the LED to the board requires getting the whole head to the melting point of solder, which takes a lot of time and a lot of heat and will easily exceed the thermal ratings on all of the parts in the power supply, not to mention the LED itself.

I learned the hard way on a Zebra. It's all joined together as well.
Just because you can doesn't mean you should.
I don't see a way to modify without degrading reliability.
Same with HDS.
 

Hogokansatsukan

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Aug 14, 2006
Messages
5,176
Location
Tucson
I have an older EDC Clicky and am trying to figure out what LED it has. I get that it is an XPG. What does the HC and numbers mean? It is a very warm (I would say around 3000k) light. One of my all time favorite lights.

View attachment 34036
It is a Cree high CRI XP-E. Without putting it on a sphere, I can't tell you the exact color temp but probably around 3k as mentioned earlier.
 

TheJLew85

Enlightened
CPF Supporter
Joined
Nov 27, 2012
Messages
447
Location
Tennessee
I have one also. Mine has a blue sticker on the spring. I think blue is 140 lumens? 🤔
One of my favorite lights. It was a clicky but had it upgraded to a rotary a while ago. I always thought it was sold as 3700k. At least that’s what I have in my notes. It does appear warmer than that tho.
 

Attachments

  • 151B285D-3803-4193-B947-295B8E7B387E.jpeg
    151B285D-3803-4193-B947-295B8E7B387E.jpeg
    193.3 KB · Views: 21

Kalsu

Newly Enlightened
CPF Supporter
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
178
So a Cree HCRI XP-E 3700k. It truly is my favorite light. I put my HDSRB on it and can't believe how much throw it has. Perfect combination.
 

neco

Enlightened
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
201
Location
Hong Kong
I wouldn't have guessed 3700k. Thanks for the information. Is yours 120 lumens (green ring) as well?
Yes green ring here.

Here is full item description dump from an old website where light was previously available.

The EDC High CRI 120 lumens flashlight (EDC-E1S-Hcri) is a high color rendering model for medical and science applications requiring accurate color differentiation. Plant, earth and skin colors take on a natural look, instead of the typical pale appearance. The special LEDs used in this flashlight have a color rendering index (CRI) of over 90 compared to a typical LED's color rendering index of around 72. The flashlight's color temperature is around 3700°K so it is considered to be warm white in appearance. And the light is conveniently small and light weight so you can carry it with you wherever you go.

The EDC High CRI 120 lumens flashlight provides the following features:

Elegant single button interface - simple access to 4 preset brightness settings.
Lowest cost of ownership.
Turns on to: 15 lumens, runtime: 12 ANSI hours.
Press-and-hold preset: 120 lumens, runtime: 1.25 tactical hours, 2 ANSI hours.
Double-click preset: 42 lumens, runtime: 4 ANSI hours.
Triple-click preset: 0.3 lumens, runtime: 128 ANSI hours.
Potted electronics for the ultimate in reliability under extreme conditions.
Sealed gold-plated switch for maximum reliability.
Anti-damage battery compartment protects battery during extreme abuse.
Nearly unbreakable ultra clear glass lens with anti-reflective coatings.
Durable Acme threads used throughout.
Constant brightness through constant power regulation.
Elegant low battery warning.
Designed for both regular lithium batteries and rechargeable Li-ion batteries.
Protects rechargeable batteries from over-discharge.
Full thermal management - never gets too hot.
Aerospace aluminum body protected with black military Type 3 hard anodize.
Silver stainless steel crenelated bezel.
Single 123 battery.
Each output preset can be customized to any brightness level, tactical strobe, emergency strobe or SOS signal.
Other custom options include selectable turn-on preset, momentary operation, automatic shut-off, button lock, locator flash and burst control.
Pocket clip, bezel down carry, black.
Water/dust proof - IP67, 20m (66 feet) of water.
Dimensions: Ø 25.4mm x 93mm (Ø 1" x 3.7").
Weight: 102g (3.6oz) including battery.
 

Lungbarrow

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
38
Hi all—

Planning on ordering a rotary soon—any idea what the approximate turnaround time is these days? Days? Weeks? Months?

Thanks!
 

Lungbarrow

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
38
Where're you going to order from in that case?
The HDS site—I just couldn’t seem to find shipping timeframes there. Open to ordering anywhere that sells rotaries of course, I just haven’t bought an HDS in years.
 

Latest posts

Top