Heat Wave 2022

Poppy

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I've had 4 hip surgeries in my life, but I'm not an expert - more of a victim I'd say:). Good on your friend for doing it, and glad it's working for them! Our Bro. @Poppy is about to make the move, and hopefully he'll be feeling better very soon!
My surgery is scheduled for this Monday. I am looking forward to it.

I spoke with my surgeon earlier today, and he says that I'll be able to put full weight on it the same day. He'll be doing the anterior approach. With that there are fewer range of motion limitations than with the posterior approach.
 

Lynx_Arc

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Yep. I honestly don't understand how some of y'all live where ya do. 🥵
Maybe we don't have it as cold in the winter.
Speaking of rain water, I read this info recently (from some other source) and was a bit shocked, but I suppose I shouldn't be:


BTW, you seem to have a fair understanding of dew point for someone in that area. Many have to live in the desert a while to fully understand it. Yes, I've lived in ARK-LA-TX (all 3), so I now have a full understanding of the whole picture:). Most people do not.

Edit: This my 12th state of residence I think. I ran out of fingers and with 2 bad hips I can barely reach my toes, so I'm not sure.
I think that rain water differs in purity as the air in some places is more clean than others. I wouldn't drink it without filtering it I use it for plants only. If I were to drink water it would be from condensate and run it through my brita pitcher. I hear condensate water can be like distilled water minus the path it has to go through to get out. I just read a few articles and most say in areas without air pollution it is safe to drink but recommend filtering it.
As for my knowledge of dew point, I learned that long ago as a kid watching weather forecasts and wondering what it was. I sort of figured out what it was when there was dew on the ground when it was that temp but considerably higher there wasn't any.
 

Chauncey Gardiner

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Maybe we don't have it as cold in the winter.

The Pacific North West is the sweet spot for weather in the Great State of Washington. We're located in Western Washington, where Washington's best weather is to be had. Indian summers. Mild Winters. Beautiful Spring. Warm, but normally not too hot Summers.
 

aznsx

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Maybe we don't have it as cold in the winter.

I think that rain water differs in purity as the air in some places is more clean than others. I wouldn't drink it without filtering it I use it for plants only. If I were to drink water it would be from condensate and run it through my brita pitcher. I hear condensate water can be like distilled water minus the path it has to go through to get out. I just read a few articles and most say in areas without air pollution it is safe to drink but recommend filtering it.
As for my knowledge of dew point, I learned that long ago as a kid watching weather forecasts and wondering what it was. I sort of figured out what it was when there was dew on the ground when it was that temp but considerably higher there wasn't any.
I just read a few articles and most say in areas without air pollution it is safe to drink
That's what I thought, but exactly what the 2022 findings (recent/current study) I linked to has refuted - which is why I was "shocked". They did in fact test globally, including places they expected to be 'OK', and found out that isn't the case. It's a very recent study. Of course where I am now, it really only rains in 2 periods during the year, so I won't be collecting it anyway - at least until the CO river runs completely dry, which at the rate things are going may not be that far away!

The dew point thing is funny. I may have used the wrong word: I have long understood it technically, just from a scientific standpoint, and what it did to me when I lived some of those other places. However, it was not before living in the desert many years later that I now fully comprehend it from the standpoint of its full effects with respect to the human body, and exactly why it has those effects. The key is not just understanding dew point (including perhaps absolute and relative humidity) and ambient temperature, but fully understanding the relationship between that and human skin and body temperature. Anyway, you have a pretty good handle on it. You would only learn more by actually spending time in a place where the dew point changes to the extreme extent that it does in, say the desert Southwest over time during the year. Basically, one must experience not only the high dew points, but also experience the super-low dew points (single-digit, and even negative numbers at times) for the last 'light bulbs' to turn on and full comprehension is reached. That is one of those things that truly must be experienced over time to be fully appreciated. That's why I generally no longer even discuss it with anyone who hasn't actually lived in single-digit dewpoints to fully 'get' the other extreme for context and complete understanding. That's another reason why as soon as anyone cracks the old "dry heat" jokes, I immediately shut up and don't even discuss it with them at all, because at that point I know they don't 'get it', have never experienced truly low dew points to any extent, and discussion is pointless. Anyway, you seem to have a good handle on it for someone who possibly hasn't experienced all that (I don't know where else you've lived). That's a compliment (not an argument), so just take it at face value:)
 

Lynx_Arc

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The Pacific North West is the sweet spot for weather in the Great State of Washington. We're located in Western Washington, where Washington's best weather is to be had. Indian summers. Mild Winters. Beautiful Spring. Warm, but normally not too hot Summers.
You wouldn't like it here, our winters tend to be milder than up north but ice is more of a problem and potholes that form because of the freezing/thawing daily cycle that hammers cracks in the streets. Our summers are more brutal that the current heat wave in CA now but this summer was perhaps about the same as out there I think the highest was 103 this year. We just finally dropped out of the mid 90s to the high 80s and from the high 70s to low 80s at night to the low to mid 70s. Power outages are never caused by high power demands here, rather storm damage etc. I do fear that in the future we will need more and more power stations to keep up with demand.
 

bykfixer

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Highs, lows, dew points, potholes.... have nothing to do with why I don't live where you live Lynx.

Nope two words best describe why I don't live there:
Tornado Alley


Softball sized hail? Nuf said. ;)
 
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Lynx_Arc

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Highs, lows, dew points, potholes.... have nothing to do with why I don't live where you live Lynx.

Nope two words best describe why I don't live there:
Tornado Alley


Nuf said. ;)

Yes I'm in Tornado alley.... but never have seen a tornado in my life but on TV. They pop up all over the place but most often don't hit where there is large populations and mostly just do minor property damage. The big ones are rare and do less overall damage than hurricanes and the forest fires that plague some parts of the country. I think you are more likely to die in a car wreck than a tornado here. The summers take more lives than tornados do.
 

bykfixer

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Yes I'm in Tornado alley.... but never have seen a tornado in my life but on TV. They pop up all over the place but most often don't hit where there is large populations and mostly just do minor property damage. The big ones are rare and do less overall damage than hurricanes and the forest fires that plague some parts of the country. I think you are more likely to die in a car wreck than a tornado here. The summers take more lives than tornados do.
It's strange how that works. Where I live there used to be what we called "tornado sidewalk". A strip of land along a river that got small tornados every few years. A small tornado is still a tornado. Anyway they were building a WalMart on this chunk of undeveloped land near a shopping mall when a tornado knocked over the two walls built so far. When it opened another one took out the garden section. About a year later one sliced a chunk out of the middle. Yet all of the land surrounding the place is developed and there has only been 1 since then.
E2E446F1-BC1A-4F29-80DD-D9754DC22FB0.jpeg
 

Chauncey Gardiner

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You wouldn't like it here, our winters tend to be milder than up north but ice is more of a problem and potholes that form because of the freezing/thawing daily cycle that hammers cracks in the streets. Our summers are more brutal that the current heat wave in CA now but this summer was perhaps about the same as out there I think the highest was 103 this year. We just finally dropped out of the mid 90s to the high 80s and from the high 70s to low 80s at night to the low to mid 70s. Power outages are never caused by high power demands here, rather storm damage etc. I do fear that in the future we will need more and more power stations to keep up with demand.

Up north covers a wide variety of weather.

Time for the Pepsi Weather Challenge

Image 9-10-22 at 5.49 AM.jpg



Image 9-10-22 at 5.53 AM.jpg
 

KITROBASKIN

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Local weather boasting? The maritime influence that moderates weather fluctuation in western parts of the USA near the Pacific ocean are nice for many. All that clouds and rain can make for a gloomy dude, though.

We should be grateful good people are doing their jobs all over the country and world, in all climates. A special hats off to those working near cattle stockyards in Texas and such.
 
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Lynx_Arc

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It's strange how that works. Where I live there used to be what we called "tornado sidewalk". A strip of land along a river that got small tornados every few years. A small tornado is still a tornado. Anyway they were building a WalMart on this chunk of undeveloped land near a shopping mall when a tornado knocked over the two walls built so far. When it opened another one took out the garden section. About a year later one sliced a chunk out of the middle. Yet all of the land surrounding the place is developed and there has only been 1 since then.
View attachment 31825
Tornadoes can be influenced by water and other natural things in the area and I think some features in nature can discourage them from forming and growing and also can get them to go in certain paths/directions. I worked at a place in the 80s that the warehouse got hit by a tornado. It tore part of the roof off and tossed things around a strip along a creek like it followed the creek and picked up a tractor putting it on top of a building. These days we should be more scared of burglars than tornados.... of the government messing the country up than natural disasters. Usually most tornados are predicted in advance. We get sirens going off when the chance is high and take cover.
 

bykfixer

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I have a phone app that buzzes when weather gets within a 30 mile radius. It's usually raining cats and dogs with trash cans flying past when our sirens begin to ring out. We joke and say "they must be doing the all clear now signal" lol.
 

Lynx_Arc

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Local weather boasting? The maritime influence that moderates weather fluctuation in western parts of the USA near the Pacific ocean are nice for many. All that clouds and rain can make for a gloomy dude, though.

We should be grateful good people are doing their jobs all over the country and world, in all climates. A special hats off to those working near cattle stockyards in Texas and such
we do have more clear days here and it can rain a lot more than average around here it has been a lot drier on average since 2010 but we are seeing more and more all day rains something that used to happen a lot here. I can often get by with a light jacket in the winter here usually folks use multiple layers as the temps swing from cold in the morning to mild in the afternoon. It was a little chilly this morning outside at 69 and is now 87 outside now.

Without people across the country doing different things making stuff and farming and having large areas of land vs cramped apartments lakes instead of swimming pools etc. It is ok here, I wouldn't move without a good reason and for now weather change isn't a good reason.
 

Chauncey Gardiner

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Local weather boasting? The maritime influence that moderates weather fluctuation in western parts of the USA near the Pacific ocean are nice for many. All that clouds and rain can make for a gloomy dude, though.

We should be grateful good people are doing their jobs all over the country and world, in all climates. A special hats off to those working near cattle stockyards in Texas and such.

Nothing of the sort. If one takes a minute to compare the two charts, it becomes obvious that Tacoma's average high and low temperatures are very similar to Tulsa's. Perhaps you missed the context of the quoted posts. Carry on. :rolleyes:
 

knucklegary

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Same here Byk.. last weekend 115°F today 70° with a Winter storm, expected 2 day event, headed our way.. Boom💥and it's Autumn!
 

bykfixer

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Same here Byk.. last weekend 115°F today 70° with a Winter storm, expected 2 day event, headed our way.. Boom💥and it's Autumn!
The fellow who gets paid to predict weather says summer returns our way for a few days. Nothing unusual. Winter storms? Those are still a ways off.
 

knucklegary

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"Snow at the highest elevation" I spent last two days cleaning leaves preparing yard.. This morning lightly drizzling, a far cry from the predicted 2" by the end of this storm. A bit chilly 54° is feeling like Fall weather. Usually, this happens around end of October for us.
 

bykfixer

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We have periods with 20 degree spreads like 60/80 for low/high. Then those opressive humid periods where 78/88 low/high take place. In winter the 20 degree spread is typical.

But the in between is the pleasant weather period where you wear a jacket in the morning but down to short sleeves by lunch. Often 30 degree gaps between low/high takes place. That period some years lasts weeks and other years a few days before the extreme hot or cold sets in. Lately it's been a 35 degree spread.

Some people speak of dew point to judge the comfort level of a forecast. Nothing wrong with that. I watch forecasted lows. Say the forecast is 95/62 I know the humidity will be down enough where the air cools after dark. 95/72 I know to expect a thick humidity.
 
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