Help me decide between green light and High CRI

knucklegary

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...so sun uv/vit D cured it. doctors could not. I have a feeling they probably knew about sun, but would not tell me, cuz sun is free, and they are not.
Back in the day ocean brine and vit D was a cure all for skin aliments. Today, depending on fecal matter percentage, UV intensity, agg runoff, a person needs to watch how much exposure they get. Inner ear infections, and pink eye are not uncommon during winter months
 
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How ironic that caucasions want to sunbath to get a tan, whereas Asians and people with darker skin avoid the Sun like the plaque
And those who have straight hair want curly hair, those who have curly hair want it straight. Those with blond hair want to dye it darker, and those with dark hair want to bleach it lighter. No ones ever happy…
 

KITROBASKIN

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OP has made the decision.

Does anyone remember several years ago SureFire presented a green beam flashlight? As far as I know, it did not pan out but wasn't the rationale something about humans can see green better than any other color?

We have a powerful green laser. One can point it parallel with the ground in the direction of travel and navigate tolerably in darkness.
 

Bob A

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Back in the day ocean brine and vit D was a cure all for skin aliments. Today, depending on fecal matter percentage, UV intensity, agg runoff, a person needs to watch how much exposure they get. Inner ear infections, and pink eye are not uncommon during winter months
Most people's Vit D levels are so low as to be unreadable. Vitamin D is essential for a healthy immune system. I take about 6000 IU of the stuff every day, and my levels are now about mid-normal range.
 

Shock&Awe

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OP has made the decision.

Does anyone remember several years ago SureFire presented a green beam flashlight? As far as I know, it did not pan out but wasn't the rationale something about humans can see green better than any other color?

We have a powerful green laser. One can point it parallel with the ground in the direction of travel and navigate tolerably in darkness.
Now you've got me thinking again. If the army uses green light, then surely it has to be beneficial, yeah?
I'm starting to think a high CRI is redundant because the CRI of the main beam is quite decent anyway
 

Shock&Awe

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Furthermore, the high CRI auxiliary light is a fixed 120 lumens. The only scenario i can see myself using a high CRI headlamp is when I'm wiring security systems/alarm systems, where wire colors is important. 120 lumens is too bright for that kind of close up work?
 

alpg88

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Furthermore, the high CRI auxiliary light is a fixed 120 lumens. The only scenario i can see myself using a high CRI headlamp is when I'm wiring security systems/alarm systems, where wire colors is important. 120 lumens is too bright for that kind of close up work?
For wires, 5000k neutral is more than adequate, I do building engineering work, hvac control boards, t-stats control cables, access control systems..... have hundreds of wires, solid colors, stripes, and with color lines going along, never had issue telling them apart even with cool light. 120 of high cri warm light is not that bright to the eye, but you will do fine with main 5000k light for that task.
 

defloyd77

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OP has made the decision.

Does anyone remember several years ago SureFire presented a green beam flashlight? As far as I know, it did not pan out but wasn't the rationale something about humans can see green better than any other color?

We have a powerful green laser. One can point it parallel with the ground in the direction of travel and navigate tolerably in darkness.

I remember that, but I believe it was more that green provided the most lumens per watt at the time.

Now you've got me thinking again. If the army uses green light, then surely it has to be beneficial, yeah?
I'm starting to think a high CRI is redundant because the CRI of the main beam is quite decent anyway

Furthermore, the high CRI auxiliary light is a fixed 120 lumens. The only scenario i can see myself using a high CRI headlamp is when I'm wiring security systems/alarm systems, where wire colors is important. 120 lumens is too bright for that kind of close up work?

If you're using the light for camping, you're going to be cooking, which you'll definitely want to be using a high CRI light source. Does Acebeam even state the CRI of the main LED? I'm guessing it's probably 70, which makes the high CRI light a much better option to use for cooking or any sort of medical related tasks.
 

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