HELP me find battery # 1 or equivalent

juancho

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Feb 26, 2004
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Long Island, New York
I have an old Infrared goggles that use a battery # 1
it is (or I think it is a NVP 5) perhaps guys remember them from Vietnam.
Well this ones are surplus Israeli Army, But they were once American, marked N.V. G 5151 (Night Vision Goggles model 5151)

I am looking for the battery, it is marked # 1 and was available until 15 years ago as a camera battery.
Perhaps somebody knows a eqivalent modern one??
For nostalgic reasons I want to put this ones back to work, I used them for a long time for wildlife observation with spotlights with infrared filters.
Thank you for helping. guys.
regards
Juan C.
P/S sorry for the bad pictures, today is not my day!!

S5300050.jpg


goggles2.jpg
 

juancho

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Feb 26, 2004
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797
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Long Island, New York
It is a single cell I think it was 1 1/2 volts but have been some time, so could have been a 3 volts.
It is as tall as you see in the picture and I know that in the picture is not clear but it have a number 1 and underneath a plus sign (for positive)
I used to get them in photo shops, but it was long ago, 16 or 17 years.
I can not recall which brand, could have been Duracells.
Juan C
 

rwolff

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Dec 22, 2004
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Ontario, CA
[ QUOTE ]

I am looking for the battery, it is marked # 1 and was available until 15 years ago as a camera battery.


[/ QUOTE ]

Since you've got pictures, I assume you have physical possession of the battery. Does it have any markings besides "#1"? Your best bet would be to take the dead battery (is it completely dead, or can you get a voltage reading off it with a DMM?) to a serious camera store (generally, one that also sells darkroom equipment and has a refrigerated storage area for professional-grade film) and see what they say.

Are you sure it's not a 1.35V battery, instead of 1.5V? Based on NVGs needing a high energy density battery (longest possible runtime but a small, lightweight battery), the #1 having been a camera battery, and that it disappeared about 15 years ago, you may be SOL - there was one very popular battery technology for both hearing aids and cameras that was legislated out of existence around then. It had high energy density (good for hearing aids) and a virtually flat discharge curve from brand new to nearly dead (good for photoresistor type lightmeters - eliminated the need for a regulator). Why was such a good battery legislated out of existence? It was known as a "mercury battery".

If it turns out that your NVGs were designed for mercury batteries, you might want to try zinc-air batteries instead.
 

juancho

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Long Island, New York
Hi guys,
It turns out that was also called MR 50, which is also out of production.
A company called "The small battery Company" is selling an adpator that use a 357 battery. And you were right rwolff, it is a 1,35 volts battery, seems that this adaptor will lower the voltage to that figure (probably by internal resistamce)
The price of the adaptor is 27.50 pounds, (quite pricey mate) and serve for the followings discontinued batteries:
Emulates: Eveready E1N / Mallory RM-1N / PX1 / MR50 / RPX1 / EPX1 / RM1 / RMIN / V1PX / H-P / Leclanche MR85 / NR50 / HD1 / HP.

Here is a picture of the adaptor.



sbc_mr50_adapter.jpg

Now, I have aquestion about this Mercury batteries, I still have 3 or 4 quite dead, can I recharge them somehow??
I just bought the Maha 777 Plus II,
Any ideas.
thanks for the answers.
Juan C.
 

Lynx_Arc

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sounds like time to make your own adapter instead as that is rediculously expensive for an adapter with a resistor in it.
You could almost wire two batteries in parallel with a resistor in that size of cylinder thus doubling runtime from one cell.
 

Streak

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ex South Africa now SoCal
Try smallbattery.company.org.uk who say the following:-

The LR50 or PX1A is a mercury-free replacement for the once popular Mercuric Oxide MR50 (or PX1) cell that was commonly used in cameras and carriage clocks. Mercury cells are now banned because of toxicity and environmental fears.

The LR50 or PC1A cells produce 1.5 Volts, which is higher than the 1.35V produced by the original mercury cell. Most devices accommodate the small increase in voltage and function perfectly.

Price GBP3.99.

Streak
 

rwolff

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Dec 22, 2004
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Ontario, CA
[ QUOTE ]

0.15v or 11% higher shouldn't harm most devices I would think.


[/ QUOTE ]

Cameras are an exception here. It's not that the new battery (presumably alkaline) has a higher voltage, but that the voltage is not stable. Mercury batteries had a flat discharge curve, so they eliminated the need for a voltage regulator. With alkaline batteries, your photos will be underexposed (higher voltage forces more current through the photoresistor, which the meter interprets as more light), but pictures from a fresh battery will be significantly more overexposed than those from a nearly-dead battery due to alkaline batteries dropping in voltage as they get used up. Zinc-air is better for cameras when taken from a voltage curve standpoint, but from a longevity standpoint they suck (once they're unsealed, they'll dry out in a couple months - mercury cells have a shelf life measured in years).
 

juancho

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Feb 26, 2004
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Location
Long Island, New York
rwolf,
I am getting an education here, about battery chemistry.
Thanks for the answers.
Can I recharge the mercury # 1 batteries I have? I have a Maha 777 plus II with leads.
Juan C.
 
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