hesitation to use a new knife

TRITON

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
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58
Location
South Australia
Gidday! Getting a nice new good looking knife or torch or gadget for that matter I like to use it but I also like to keep it looking in new condition. I was brought up to appreciate nice things and look after my tools and equipment. Actually I even custom polish them to my likeing,[the jeweller in me, like shiny things] Plus its a slightly different look [custom embellishment].Not your standard run of the mill thingy but a spiffed up thingy that you like to look at when ever you pull it out of your pocket [to use it ]. :wave:
 

BIGLOU

Enlightened
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
717
I also hesitate to bring out my good stuff. To me $70-$100 knife is OK for EDC. Of course I have my self queens like my $250 Protech TR3 and $237 Benchmeade 9050 AFO. At work I happily have been carrying for about 5 years a SOG Flash II ($84) it has a glass reforced Zytel handle which doesnt scratch and I have not dropped or have tried to use as a screwdriver or open New Castles. I also have a couple of Kershaws I have that I got a Walmart like the Storm II, Leek, Tactical Blur and the Scallion. These were 50-80 bucks, good USA quality and could always buy another one.
 

CDS

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Feb 20, 2010
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9
Location
Bangor, Maine
Its not about sharpening for me. I can sharpen quite well. As a mater of fact I'm not sure if you trust people to use blades if they don't at least know how to take care of them.

I'm referring to the ware of hard use. I freely agree that things are just things, and its a little silly, but don't you hate it when you scratch your favorite Light, or watch, stain your jacket, dent your car, stain your best shirt and so on. That's what It feels like when I cosmetically damage a especially nice blade.

I would also like to also say that some knives seem to look better old and worn "stag to me". I don't think there is a correct answer, just different correct opinions dependent on your personal perspective. I think its a matter of personal taste, and I don't want anyone to take that personally :)
 
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Archie Cruz

Banned
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
205
Collecting versus Using. An ancient dichotomy.
I hesitate to drive my $3M Bugatti Veyron, I must use my Extrema Ratio BF3 every day or I don't eat.
Decide. Is it a part of your collection (put it in a display case) or did you buy it to use it? If neither, it's time to sell it.
Collections are not much part of my life anymore. I have a section in a book I'm authoring on the very subject. Collections are for museums and galleries. When I die, I hope I will only have my Akari, a tatami, a bowl for food, a bowl for water and a chamber pot to my name.:ohgeez:
 

CDS

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Feb 20, 2010
Messages
9
Location
Bangor, Maine
I agree with Archie on principle, I just cant seem to stop collecting. Its an addiction I guess, I'm working on it...without much luck.
 

Archie Cruz

Banned
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
205
I agree with Archie on principle, I just cant seem to stop collecting. Its an addiction I guess, I'm working on it...without much luck.
Collecting is an addiction that is both typically human and curable. The collection addiction is typically a compensation mechanism for something missing in one's life. Typically, that missing something is called "Meaningfulness". So we attach a synthetic meaningfulness to a collection of objects and the process of collecting that become an erstwhile surrogate 'family' with nurturing family behavior. This type of attachment is both cathectic and cathartic, but because boredom and familiarity "breed contempt", new items have to constantly be added and trading becomes an easy route.
Museum collections, however, are typically shared with the public and in many cases, owned by the public, making them accessible to multiple generations. Visiting such collections allows us to feel kinship, without breaking the bank.
Speaking of which, whatever happened to the LED Museum?
 
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RedLED

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
3,608
Location
Palm Springs, CA, Beverly Hills, CA, Washington, D
Collecting is an addiction that is both typically human and curable. The collection addiction is typically a compensation mechanism for something missing in one's life. Typically, that missing something is called "Meaningfulness". So we attach a synthetic meaningfulness to a collection of objects and the process of collecting that become an erstwhile surrogate 'family' with nurturing family behavior. This type of attachment is both cathectic and cathartic, but because boredom and familiarity "breed contempt", new items have to constantly be added and trading becomes an easy route.
Museum collections, however, are typically shared with the public and in many cases, owned by the public, making them accessible to multiple generations. Visiting such collections allows us to feel kinship, without breaking the bank.
Speaking of which, whatever happened to the LED Museum?

Arch,

When you speak of the museum collections, do mean something like the Soviets did for their people?

After cutting thru all the psycho babble, I must ask, are you an old Hippie or a Commie?

A liberal Arts Major for sure. What is the title of your book? I Can't wait to read it!

Let's hear the positive and necessary aspects of collecting, along with the role that collections and collectors play in the world.

Just how do you think the museums you speak of get items for their collections? Mostly from private collectors.

The collector of things not only retains items, which may disappear over time, they also become the authority on whatever they collect. This could be anything from spoons to original art to cars, books, anything. I even knew a man who collected planes.

So before you spew your dim psycho, pre-print ideas, to a site mostly dedicated to flashlight collecting, maybe you should provide both sides to the story.

Your post implies that people who happen to collect things as a hobby, have a void in their lives, and need to somehow parent whatever they happen to collect. There are cases in which a collection can go too far, but having and keeping many lights over the years, is fine and even healthy recreation.

Collecting is very educational. You are certainly no historian.

Again, I Can't wait for your book. Also, why not add your Bio to that section here on the forum so we can get an idea of your background.

With all best wishes,

Ned Redway
 
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CDS

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Feb 20, 2010
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9
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Bangor, Maine
"After cutting thru all the psycho babble, I must ask, are you an old Hippie or a Commie?"

:confused: W.T.F. RED :confused:

and

Dude... don't tell me I need to relax. I didn't just go all McCarthy on someone for no reason.
 

Archie Cruz

Banned
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
205
Ned
Arch,

When you speak of the museum collections, do mean something like the Soviets did for their people?

No I mean like most museums are publicly accessible so a community can all experience fabulous collections at little or no cost types of museums . Versus PRIVATE collections like the stuffy old Victorians had in their parlors, which were nice too. Some folks are not collecting, so much as they are HOARDING, which is social illness, and may point to a psychological deficiency or compensation. I knew a guy that didn't even care about receiving the package, he just loves saying thanks to the delivery person:oops:

After cutting thru all the psycho babble, I must ask, are you an old Hippie or a Commie?
I don't smoke pot, wear a 60's peace sign or say stuff like "Hey Man..." and I'm definitely NOT a true commie, though I sort of subscribe to a genre of economics I term "Socio-Capitalism", kind what exists in many parts of Europe, beginning to happen in China and other parts of the world.

A liberal Arts Major for sure. What is the title of your book? I Can't wait to read it!
Double Major in College- Art & Psychology :)
Let's hear the positive and necessary aspects of collecting, along with the role that collections and collectors play in the world.
I think the positive aspect of academic collecting is clear.
Here's a trial statement:
Academic collecting, in contrast to pathological collecting, has the distinct benefit of enlarging a culture's inventory of historical references (AKA Collections) for the express purpose of tracing a meaningful, interesting and evolutionary path from early beginning to an ongoing process of innovation or decadence through time.©2010 - Imägo Metrics LLC

I used to be a member of the private club, the FAN CLUB. We Collected, rescued, restored and traded vintage table fans. This is the kind of collection I'm talking about that indeed, as you point out, get donated to the Smithsonian ( as all mine were) . We carefully documented the geneology of fans, their manufacture etc. If we wanted to, we could even have compared patents, innovations etc. but for us, it was just the aesthetics of a beautiful object make made wind like non of the plastic crap of today does!
Without dissing Craig of LED Museum, much of that 'collection' is of dubious merit. Yet another 'eh' clone of yet another 'eh' clone is not a museum collection. See the difference?
Now, if you took THE LED Museum's collection and glued the whole lot together into a shape that looked like a ROOM sized flashlight, that would it a collection as art object– worthy of museum exhibit.
See the difference?


Just how do you think the museums you speak of get items for their collections? Mostly from private collectors.

Many collections are stolen artifacts – let's not forget :devil:

The collector of things not only retains items, which may disappear over time, they also become the authority on whatever they collect. This could be anything from spoons to original art to cars, books, anything. I even knew a man who collected planes.
Agreed. Many collectors are highly esteemed and sought-after connoisseurs, but they publish their observations of historical references, not merely performance specs or physical dimensions. Surely the true connoisseur imbues his collection with provinence by virtue of academic interpretation?
So before you spew your dim psycho, pre-print ideas, to a site mostly dedicated to flashlight collecting, maybe you should provide both sides to the story.

Your post implies that people who happen to collect things as a hobby, have a void in their lives, and need to somehow parent whatever they happen to collect. There are cases in which a collection can go too far, but having and keeping many lights over the years, is fine and even healthy recreation.

Sorry, you've just underscored my point. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with compensation, only that it masks whatever is being compensated, when better therapy is at hand (I have to deal with three hoarder neighbors that pay more for storage than my condo rents for!). Collecting friends is healthy, collecting awards for doing positive things is healthy, collecting mementos of life experience is healthy and critical to historical preservation. Collecting EVERY version of anything that comes out? you decide.

I hope that my prior depictions, dispose of this criticism to your satisfaction?:whistle:
Collecting is very educational. You are certainly no historian.
Really? How much of Illuminations history can you recount of the past 5 years?

Again, I Can't wait for your book.
I'm working on two and two guides. Which one do I reference?


Also, why not add your Bio to that section here on the forum so we can get an idea of your background.
RIGHT!!! CPF is NOT a real names forum. Sorry. Once the owner demands for it to be a real-names forum, I'll gladly fulfill your desire. Besides, I have growing list of stalkers to deal with already. No thanks!
With all best wishes,

Ned Redway
 
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z17813

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
52
I still hate using the poop out of knives that I paid high dollars for; it must be the peasant in me!

This times a thousand!!!

I really like having cool pocket knives, lights, gadgets of any kind, but there are times where I get pangs of guilt!
I still remember the first time I chipped the blade of a pocket knife... the shame :crazy:
 

Illum

Flashaholic
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
13,053
Location
Central Florida, USA
I had a similar issue with my BM Nagara, its not an expensive knife but I've carried it until the scales are badly worn with streaks and scratches and the blade haven't touched anything I can't tear open by hand:ohgeez:
 

keeftea

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Aug 10, 2009
Messages
33
I am not a collector but I could see it to be like collecting fine wine or anything for that matter. I own sigh with me under 10 knives and use all of them. The part that I love and look forward to is sharpening, just something really soothing like gardening for me. Anyhow, I enjoy using them just so I can put an edge back on them using different stones.

For the guy who asked how to recover a dull edge, answer really depends on how bad/dull and intended use. For most stuff extra coarse diamond benchstone followed by coarse and fine. For better steel like some vg or japanese steel ill use a synthetic japanese whetstone 1000.

P.S. If anyone has an old norton lilly and want to sell pm me!
 

Archie Cruz

Banned
Joined
Aug 1, 2007
Messages
205
Friends. I'm out of town with the boss. Basically, I'm holding fort on the road as he attends to urgent and sudden family issues. So I'm using my stunted laptop without access to all my image library. Someone asked about jewelry pics? I'll post some when we're back in the office. Also we design and invent and so I'm stretched right now. Barely have time for the 'john'.
Thanks for understanding.
More later. :popcorn:
 
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