High CRI Cool White?

GarageBoy

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So... is there ANY interest at all with cool tint High CRI?

Or am I alone?
I'm hoping LED technology will evolve to allow this
 

THE_dAY

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You are not alone, I'm very interested in having higher CRI in cooler LEDs but I guess I would go as high as 5500K maybe 6000K.

Regular cool white LEDs can be up to around 8000K which is too cool for my tastes.
 

calipsoii

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McGizmo uses the highest CCT Nichia 119's that the company sells. If I recall correctly, they're 4500-5000k. That's about the absolute highest temperature I'd want a high CRI emitter in.

Keep in mind that CRI and CCT are two totally separate beasts. You can have an emitter than is 93CRI @ 3000k and one that is 93CRI @ 5000k. Objects you illuminate will look completely different depending on which of those emitters you use.

CRI is simply a measure of whether or not colors appear accurate for that specific color temperature. If you don't like cool white LED's, making them high CRI won't change that much, they're still cool white, just the colors stand out a little better.
 

twl

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I'd be interested.
5000-6000k would be great in Hi CRI.

I hate warm!
Yuck!
 

monkeyboy

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McGizmo's sundrop uses the High CRI Nichia 083 with CCT of 5500K. The 083 contains 6 dice spread out so has little throw ability.

The Haiku high CRI uses the coolest bin (4500K-5000K) Nichia 119 as mentioned above which has a single 2 mm^2 die. This gives it reasonable throw and higher output but slightly warmer CCT than the sundrop. I haven't seen this cool bin 119 available anywhere else other than in McGizmo's lights.
 

ElectronGuru

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CRI is simply a measure of whether or not colors appear accurate for that specific color temperature.

Thats the way CRI is sold. Accuracy depends upon the standard its compared to. CRI is the degree to which a light source matches the color rendering of a black body radiator at the same CCT. ie, a block of steel heated to 5000 degrees glows white, with a hint of blue. This is the scale from which "color temperature" comes from.
 

hoongern

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Thats the way CRI is sold. Accuracy depends upon the standard its compared to. CRI is the degree to which a light source matches the color rendering of a black body radiator at the same CCT. ie, a block of steel heated to 5000 degrees glows white, with a hint of blue. This is the scale from which "color temperature" comes from.

Yup - and I think this is why some of us would love to have a 5500K high CRI as it pretty much matches the light coming from the sun (daylight averages ~ 5500K 100CRI, being a black body radiator) - hence the reason McGizmo's 5500K "Sundrop" was named so in the first place. Whether or not someone would like this I believe to be personal preference, but hey, light which is similar to sunlight probably can't be bad... I would love for more 5000-6000K high CRI lights to come out as standard. (By high CRI I mean matching the sun's spectrum as closely as possible, as various spectra can have the same resulting CRI, afaik)
 
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Nil Einne

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I'd be interested.
5000-6000k would be great in Hi CRI.

I hate warm!
Yuck!
I'd like that too. Pity there are so few high CRI high CCT LEDs. I'm not even asking for 90, even 80 would be great.
 
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the.Mtn.Man

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Thats the way CRI is sold. Accuracy depends upon the standard its compared to. CRI is the degree to which a light source matches the color rendering of a black body radiator at the same CCT. ie, a block of steel heated to 5000 degrees glows white, with a hint of blue. This is the scale from which "color temperature" comes from.

I thought it was based on magnesium.
 

CarpentryHero

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Hi cri cool white or nuetral white would be awesome, thanks for clarifying what is used in the haiku sundrop
5000k at even 85 cri has my wallet cringing ;)
 

B0wz3r

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I've mentioned this before in other threads, but while from a physics viewpoint CRI and CCT aren't related, they do have a very strong relationship perceptually, in terms of how the photoreceptors and the visual system works. We naturally see reds and yellows better because most of our cones are the medium and long wavelength cones. So even if an emitter were produced that had a very high CCT and a high CRI rating, it wouldn't necessarily look like it renders color better than an emitter with a warmer tint. The eye is differentially sensitive to different colors and that will affect the perception of CRI. So while it could be done from a physics/engineering viewpoint, it wouldn't necessarily produce a light that gives a perceptual experience of balanced color rendition.
 
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