Home Maintenance

Hooked on Fenix

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14 gauge wire rated for 15 amps.
12 gauge wire rated for 20 amps.
10 gauge wire rated for 30 amps.
These are assuming copper solid wire.

14/2 Romex is white (outer insulation)
12/2 Romex is yellow.
10/2 Romex is orange.

14/3, 12/3, and 10/3 have an extra red (hot) wire for circuits with a basic on/off switch.

If you want to bring power to something, get 2 wire Romex (black, white, green). In the areas of a circuit with an on/off switch, use 3 wire Romex (black, red, white, green). For a three way or four way switch use 4 wire Romex (black, red, blue, white, green). This is the second number of the Romex, doesn't include the ground (does include neutral as current carrying conductor). 4 wire Romex (12/4 Romex) has 5 wires. Technically, switches only need a ground and two or more hot wires (no neutral), so if it's cheaper to run wire in conduit, you can save the cost of a white wire here. Otherwise, just wirenut the spare neutral wire.

14 gauge used for most things (lighting, some outlets, fans)
12 gauge used for some appliances (refrigerator), kitchen, bathroom circuit, and outdoor (anything with GFCI outlet protection- near water)
10 gauge or higher used for electric range

Get a razor knife to strip the outer layer of the Romex end. Try not to cut into the insulation of the inner wires with the razor knife. Get a good pair of Ideal wire strippers and use the holes in them to bend the wire. Make sure to wrap wire around screws clockwise for switches and outlets if you didn't back stab them (in both cases strip wire ends first).

Green or bare wire goes to green (ground) screw.
White wire goes to silver screw (neutral).
Black wire goes to brass screw (hot).

Always wire in order: ground (green), white (neutral), hot (black). Unwire in reverse order. Always treat it as if it is hot.

When hooking to existing power, hot may not always be black. For 120 volts it can be black, red, or blue. See all three, that's a full boat. Get an electrician before you screw something up. If you see brown, orange, yellow, gray, and green wires, don't touch. That's 220 volts. Get an electrician to take the risks.

Before doing anything, it's best to turn the circuit breaker off and get out a tester to confirm that what you are working on at the other end is indeed off. Make sure nobody can turn it back on while you are working.

Use an insulated screwdriver or 10 in one to tighten screws on devices. Never assume a power drill is insulated to protect you from current in this way when working on something hot. You might wake up on the floor after finding out it wasn't.

Forgot to add in about switches. Unlike outlets, that have a hot (black), neutral (white), and ground, switches only have hots and a ground. An on/off switch will have two brass screws. Black wire is for power going to the switch. Red is for switched power (turns on and off).

Three way switches have two brass screws and a black screw. Black screw is the common. You'll have two hots, one coming from a separate on/off switch from each side and the common, a separate "hot" wire that only runs between the on/off switch and the three way switch on each side (doesn't connect directly to power like other hots). So you will have two of these common wires during makeup of the three way switch. Strip ends, wirenut together with a short wire tail, leaving only one wire to attach to black screw. Attach the other two hots to the remaining brass screws, doesn't matter which one. Attach ground wire to green screw.

Four way switches switch between two three way switches. You'll have five screws. A green (ground), two brass (hot), and two black (common). You'll have two wires coming in from one side and two coming in from the other side. That is what you need to remember. The two coming in on one side, attach those two hots (one will be power, one will be common) to each of the two screws on one side of the switch (a brass and a black). The two hots coming in from the other side, attach to the other brass and black screw. Forget about which is power and which is common. It won't matter as long as you have the wires coming from the direction of one three way switch hooked to one side and the wires coming from the other three way switch hooked to the other side. It's not rocket science, Don't try to make it more complicated than it has to be. If any wires are doubled up, tail them out like in the three way switch so you have only one wire going to each screw. Try not to make wires longer than the length of your fist with your thumb extended sticking out of the box (6") or you'll have a hard time cramming them back in when you're done.
 
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leukos

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Apr 8, 2004
Messages
3,495
Location
Indianapolis
Don't blame the electrician. When I started doing electrical work, a 250 foot roll of 12/2 Romex wire was under $30. Now it's $139. Canned lighting was cheap with regular bulbs. Now everything has built in l.e.d. and you have to replace the whole fixture. In commercial buildings in CA, code requires four zones/circuits per room with varying levels of dimming away from the windows plus an emergency circuit, a $10,000 lighting control panel to tie it all together and a back door remote cutoff switch (demand response) for the utility company to control your lights and a.c. directly. Wiring a floor of an office building can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. All electrical apprentices and journeymen have to go through 8,000 hours of training in an approved apprenticeship program being bounced around between strangers for 4 years hoping that one *** during that process doesn't ruin their career to make journeyman. Then, they get stuck mostly on residential jobs where they spend more money in gas getting to the job and time gathering supplies at Home Depot than at the job. Most residential jobs require climbing through an attic in summer to run wire to hook up a ceiling fan where they are roasting up there in 120 degree heat. Then that $1000 goes mostly to the contractor who bid the job, not the guy doing the work, and for materials. Usually the guy doing the job gets about $20-$40 an hour before taxes and half the people stiff him on the bill.
Nope. About $75 of that was in materials. I agree there was additional time involved for travel, but you are probably right that most of it went to overhead since they had a minimum charge of $1000 for any job. The other (unsuccessful) bid quoted $2700.
 

bykfixer

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Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,850
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Dust in the Wind
My first wife's uncle was a master electrician who was color blind. 😱.

He re-wired my first house without turning off the power source. He didn't want to buy a permit. I told him I'd gladly pay the fee. He said "I don't want those crooked b@$tards anywhere near me". Meaning the local building inspectors. The house had knob and tube wiring. When he was done we had extra outlets and porch lights.

He would run the wire to places and wait for me to arrive to make connections since he was color blind. In the attic I'd hear "d@mit, ok go flip the breaker"......a few minutes later "ow, d@mit, ok go flip the breaker"..... and so on. As he did that we mapped the breaker box too.
 

BillBond

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
Messages
73
Location
Phoenix
How do you deal with things breaking around the house? I swear just this month, I've had a dishwasher go out, and now the bathroom faucet is leaking. Just seems like its something every month. Anybody else in a similar situation?

Nothing new to us. We have two houses, one built in 1962 and the weekend house in 2004.
Obviously the older one has more problems and I thought that now I am retired I could get caught up,
but now that appears to be a wet dream.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
3,337
My first wife's uncle was a master electrician who was color blind. 😱.

He re-wired my first house without turning off the power source. He didn't want to buy a permit. I told him I'd gladly pay the fee. He said "I don't want those crooked b@$tards anywhere near me". Meaning the local building inspectors. The house had knob and tube wiring. When he was done we had extra outlets and porch lights.

He would run the wire to places and wait for me to arrive to make connections since he was color blind. In the attic I'd hear "d@mit, ok go flip the breaker"......a few minutes later "ow, d@mit, ok go flip the breaker"..... and so on. As he did that we mapped the breaker box too.
I had to retire from doing any electrical work due to a movement disorder. My right arm will go nuts and try to smack me around. Chorea in my midsection has made going up ladders like riding a mechanical bull. I've been woken up in the middle of the night from being suddenly folded up like a taco sideways. Had movement disorder react with a brain m.r.i. and repeatedly stretch me out and compress me at the midsection. Tried helping brother clean out a cast iron stove and while holding it tilted, the movement disorder caused thirty seconds of uncontrollable twerking as my nephew just stood there and laughed. Tried to fill a lawnmower with a gas can and shimmied to the ground. During phone call interview with disability to apply for benefits, I had to wrestle my arm for control of the phone during the conversation. And yes, I'm still driving (one handed).

Doctors are idiots. 7+ years and they still can't conclusively tell what's wrong with me. I had to figure out the on/off switch for movement disorder myself. It's GABA. Testing with 4 over the counter supplements (GABA, DHEA, reduced glutathione, vitamin C) in a few months, I diagnosed Crohn's disease and Hashimoto Encephalitis, I treated both, and fixed vitamin absorption problems caused by celiac disease (Hashimotos uses up glutathione trying to fight its antibodies. It serves a second purpose recycling vitamin C in a process called the Kreb's cycle which converts pyruvate to vitamins, minerals, fats, cholesterol, enzymes, sugar, protein, etc. When glutathione and vitamin C- antioxidants, are used up fighting Hashimotos, that system grinds to a halt). Hashimoto Encephalitis is the only type that responds to steroids (cortisol). Cortisol is a stress hormone. Movement disorder gets worse with stress. No other disease can do that. Crohn's is treated with corticosteroids which are prescription only. However, when in trouble, the body prioritizes cortisol production above all other adrenal hormones. So I just had to give the body another stress hormone downstream of cortisol to let it built back up it's natural levels so it could heal my gut. DHEA did the trick. Naturally increasing cortisol keeps the Crohn's under control and treats the Hashimoto Encephalitis as well. Now I have to get a final evaluation for disability before I get to see my neurologist and movement specialist next. Wish me luck. Going into this having mostly self treated 4 incurable autoimmune diseases that two haven't been acknowledged by doctors yet and hoping they don't say "Looks like you can work now."
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
21,112
Location
NYC
Very sorry to hear what you are going through.
Definitely agree with you regarding doctors.
The ones who aren't idiots, see us as customers instead of patients.
Though we pay with insurance cards and our wallets.

Looking back at all the doctors I've seen over the years, only two actually got rid of my medical problems. One was so many years ago, I don't remember his name. Podiatrist who saved my big toe from getting amputated, after an infection. (Wish I remembered his name.) The other one, Dr. Juan Romero. Eye specialist and surgeon who saved me from going blind.

Other than those two, the rest have been useless. "Take these prescriptions everyday. They'll help."

They just won't get rid of my conditions because then the doctors would have no repeat business.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
10,838
Location
Pacific N.W.
Painting -
IMG_6110.JPG


and plumbing -

IMG_6114.JPG

The shut-off valve had been leaking for a week. I decided to have a look today..... broke the PVC pipe. 😁
Independence Day 2024!
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
14,082
nothing in my home runs over 10 amps well my hot water does id guess .but im thinking a makine g a solar heater just a boreing one black hose lol
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Dec 13, 2007
Messages
3,337
nothing in my home runs over 10 amps well my hot water does id guess .but im thinking a makine g a solar heater just a boreing one black hose lol
That's not usually the issue. Usually electrical circuits have more than one thing on them. If you had an electrician with any competence, they added up all the lighting you had on the ceiling and put them on one circuit, making sure to match the load well with the circuit breaker for them all at the electrical panel. The outlets in a room are probably all on one circuit combined to be able to handle 15 amps. A kitchen circuit is probably about the same, but with all the outlets linked to one GFCI outlet and 12 gauge/20 amp wire connecting everything together so that the total all of those outlets can consume at one time is 20 amps.

Certain appliances that consume large amounts of power by themselves will have dedicated circuits with their own circuit breakers. This will usually include the refrigerator, the microwave, an electric hot water heater, an a/c unit, etc.

If you put more load on a circuit than the wire can handle, or undersize the wire for the load, the wire can start a fire and burn your house down. Circuit breakers are rated to trip at certain levels and are based on matching up with the wire size and amperage. If you hook up a wire too thin to a circuit breaker rated for a higher amperage and use too much power, you risk burning your house down. Match the rated amperage of the circuit breaker to the rated amperage of the wire. If you can't do this, be prepared to lose your homeowner's insurance policy if your house doesn't burn down first.

In most cases, the minimum size circuit breaker and wire allowed is 15 amps or 14 gauge copper wire. California is starting to allow 16 gauge in some lighting circumstances, but if you don't know the code and the limitations, don't bother trying it.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Dec 13, 2007
Messages
3,337
Black pipe run in switchbacks up or down a south facing hill makes a decent hot water heater, better if it's encased in glass frame for greenhouse effect and to trap in heat in winter. Paint surface below the pipe black as well. Remember to use metal pipe. The heat will probably be enough to melt plastic. If not, it will definitely change the taste of your water and may weaken the connections between pipes to where you are constantly fixing the system.

If you want to do anything actually solar powered to cut down on electric bill and do it yourself, remember permitting is required for systems over around 50 volts if I remember correctly. 12-48 volt solar panel systems don't have to be inspected or permitted for the most part. Just have an inverter bump up the voltage to 120 at the end of the line and you're good. Don't forget to add a battery to the system. Sodium ion is best if you can get your hands on them yet. They'll be flooding the market by next year. Don't waste money on lithium ion or lithium iron phosphate. Sodium ion batteries handle all temperatures, discharge at 10C, have the most number of charges, are cheaper than lithium technologies, and you won't lose your homeowners insurance from high risk of a fire. If you can wait until next year, you may find you'll have more options. Some companies are also working on solid state sodium ion batteries (more power density needed for cars, not necessary for homes)

Don't buy 120 volt panels with micro inverters if you plan to do any projects yourself. Those panels are made cheap without a neutral wire (can't deal with unused current without building up heat and burning your house down). That is why when the power goes out, you can't use any of this power with a grid tied system without a battery backup. The excess power has to go somewhere. They design these systems to automatically shut down during a power outage to keep from burning your house down. That's also why they want to make sure these panels were permitted and inspected when installed. A licensed electrician must install them so if something goes wrong and the house burns down, there is some accountability (insurance company wants someone to blame).
 

PhotonWrangler

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Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
14,609
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In a handbasket
I had to retire from doing any electrical work due to a movement disorder. My right arm will go nuts and try to smack me around. Chorea in my midsection has made going up ladders like riding a mechanical bull. I've been woken up in the middle of the night from being suddenly folded up like a taco sideways. Had movement disorder react with a brain m.r.i. and repeatedly stretch me out and compress me at the midsection. Tried helping brother clean out a cast iron stove and while holding it tilted, the movement disorder caused thirty seconds of uncontrollable twerking as my nephew just stood there and laughed. Tried to fill a lawnmower with a gas can and shimmied to the ground. During phone call interview with disability to apply for benefits, I had to wrestle my arm for control of the phone during the conversation. And yes, I'm still driving (one handed).

Doctors are idiots. 7+ years and they still can't conclusively tell what's wrong with me. I had to figure out the on/off switch for movement disorder myself. It's GABA. Testing with 4 over the counter supplements (GABA, DHEA, reduced glutathione, vitamin C) in a few months, I diagnosed Crohn's disease and Hashimoto Encephalitis, I treated both, and fixed vitamin absorption problems caused by celiac disease (Hashimotos uses up glutathione trying to fight its antibodies. It serves a second purpose recycling vitamin C in a process called the Kreb's cycle which converts pyruvate to vitamins, minerals, fats, cholesterol, enzymes, sugar, protein, etc. When glutathione and vitamin C- antioxidants, are used up fighting Hashimotos, that system grinds to a halt). Hashimoto Encephalitis is the only type that responds to steroids (cortisol). Cortisol is a stress hormone. Movement disorder gets worse with stress. No other disease can do that. Crohn's is treated with corticosteroids which are prescription only. However, when in trouble, the body prioritizes cortisol production above all other adrenal hormones. So I just had to give the body another stress hormone downstream of cortisol to let it built back up it's natural levels so it could heal my gut. DHEA did the trick. Naturally increasing cortisol keeps the Crohn's under control and treats the Hashimoto Encephalitis as well. Now I have to get a final evaluation for disability before I get to see my neurologist and movement specialist next. Wish me luck. Going into this having mostly self treated 4 incurable autoimmune diseases that two haven't been acknowledged by doctors yet and hoping they don't say "Looks like you can work now."
Oh my gosh. I've never heard of Hashimoto Encephalitis before. I looked it up and it's pretty rare. I'm sorry to hear that you're going through this. It looks like you've done an impressive amount of research on it though. Kudos to you for finding ways to mitigate it.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Messages
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Oh my gosh. I've never heard of Hashimoto Encephalitis before. I looked it up and it's pretty rare. I'm sorry to hear that you're going through this. It looks like you've done an impressive amount of research on it though. Kudos to you for finding ways to mitigate it.
Took awhile to figure out what could cause spinal damage in three places, could trigger movement disorder based on stress, could cause damage to nerves in brain connecting to ears causing tinnitus, mimic MS with needle like shooting and stabbing pains in nerves, and cause Crohn's and motility issues. Plus about a hundred more symptoms I won't go into.

This has driven the doctors nuts because after the body gets damaged, it sends cortisol to repair the damage or what caused it. Makes it hard to diagnose. Having a strong threshold for pain and a good response to stress from 21 years in martial arts, my adrenal glands have held up longer than most people's would. After all those years in training, the disease has also taken longer to break down my muscles and bones. I used to break boards with my head. Broke a 4 foot long 1 1/8" dowel with my shin. People sparring me used to kick my legs and complain that I hurt them. But now, I can't work due to lack of energy, stress will activate the movement disorder, and my muscles will break down further, as well as potential brain damage. I'm just happy to have found a bit of a reprieve for now. With all this disease has thrown at me, there's no telling what will come next. But I thank God for enough functioning brain cells left to have figured out what to do about it for now.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Did the doctors mention possible Mercury or lead poisoning?
No, not in an area with bad water. Was tested for Wilson's disease (allergy to copper). Was negative. If it was something like mercury or lead poisoning, they would have found it long ago. The movement disorder started shortly after the second shot of the Covid vaccine, so I know that made things worse.

Have Hashimotos. Once you get one autoimmune disease, you are more susceptible to getting more. I'm up to 4 now. Hashimotos Thyroiditis, Hashimotos Encephalitis, Celiac disease, Crohn's disease.

Hashimotos and Celiac disease occur in women 8 times more frequently than in men. First symptoms involved my crotch painfully sucking into my body for a month straight followed by growing full sized breasts in a month. There were plenty of times I contemplated suicide during those two months due to excruciating pain. Thought the only thing that could do that to a guy at my age was both an androgen insensitivity like Kennedy Disease and Klinefelter Syndrome causing XXY chromosomes. Tested negative for both.

My skull has been shrinking slightly and it has caused damage to the nerves to my ears. Encephalitis is usually caused by swelling to nerves in brain and spine that cause damage. In my case, the skull shrinking is causing damage. Damage has been done to spine in neck, upper and lower back causing slipped disks to press into spinal column. When the swelling occurred, it caused the disks to slip. Body sent cortisol to relieve the swelling so when it shows up on the m.r.i., it doesn't show the swelling that would indicate encephalitis. The cause was covered up. All that cortisol converts to estrogen through aromatization in fat cells. This is basically like Cushing's Disease. The estrogen has caused muscle loss and made some not so masculine changes to my body. I think a mild androgen insensitivity less powerful than Kennedy's disease made me susceptible to these autoimmune diseases. Women have smaller heads than men. A mild androgen insensitivity (all less than Kennedy's disease are linked to prostate cancer) trying to shrink my head may be the likely culprit of all these symptoms.

I have not found anybody with weirder symptoms than I have experienced over the last 7+ years. The doctors are still scratching their heads. The people from disability are trying to figure out what box to check to categorize me under.
 
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leukos

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Apr 8, 2004
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3,495
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Indianapolis
Sounds like a slog and a lot of your own research to stitch together some very complicated symptoms, I hope you have a support network for managing it all. After years of mystery symptoms, my wife was finally diagnosed with Hashimotos Thyroiditis and learned it had been untreated and doing damage for at least 20 years previously. With following the autoimmune protocol (AIP) diet, she has been able to mostly manage her symptoms. I sympathize with you that autoimmune diseases often go undetected and are still poorly understood. There is also a lot of invisible suffering that most people don't understand. We like to think physicians are all as clever as House, but the reality is different, we still have to advocate for ourselves, ask a lot of questions, and do a bit of our own research. I'm also not surprised to hear about the COVID vaccine affecting your conditions. Based on the anecdotal evidence of my wife's Hashimotos community and the knowledge that the COVID virus attacks the immune system and the brain, I suspect that most people who have experienced "long COVID" or issues with the vaccines had undiagnosed autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases run in my family too with diabetes on both sides of the family. I wish the science of microbiome (gut health) was more advanced so we could better understand what foods work best with our individual genes and gut bacteria. Probably would revolutionize medicine. Just wanted to share some support and solidarity with what you are going through and hope for some answers and symptom relief soon.
 
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Hooked on Fenix

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AIP diet is to lower inflammation by avoiding foods which make this worse. This is being reactive to Hashimotos. You have to be proactive. The inflammation source is the peroxidase antibodies attacking the thyroid. Glutathione, your body's master antioxidant fights the antibodies by converting them from hydrogen peroxide to harmless water. Your glutathione reserves get used up fighting these antibodies and inflammation from eating the wrong foods. Instead of just being on this diet, your wife should be taking Setria, also called reduced glutathione. It's over the counter. I get mine cheapest at Vitacost.com. Take 250-500 mg a day, with 500 mg of vitamin C.

As I probably mentioned in past posts, there is something called the Kreb's cycle. The second function of glutathione is recycling vitamin C in this cycle which takes pyruvate, a form of sugar energy and converts it to vitamins, minerals, cholesterol, fats, sugars, enzymes, etc. This is why people with Hashimotos develop celiac disease and a host of other problems. The cycle grinds to a halt when you run out of glutathione from fighting the Hashimoto antibodies. You end up with high cholesterol, fatty liver (body doesn't make enzymes liver needs to function), vitamin B2 deficiency/B6 toxicity (sensory nerve damage), Crohn's disease (body doesn't produce enough cholesterol to produce cortisol to fight next gut diseases), Wilson's disease (allergy to copper from having too much built up in your system), etc.

Unfortunately, doctors have done a **** poor job in treating Hashimotos and only replace the lost hormone (Levothyroxine) caused by the damaged thyroid. They do absolutely nothing against the antibodies to slow the disease's progression by prescribing Setria (reduced glutathione), as they should. They ignore the fact that the continued loss of glutathione causes havoc on all of your body's processes causing a domino effect for your health. Now that you know this, you can help your wife. Just those two over the counter supplements, reduced glutathione/ L glutathione/ Setria, and a large daily dose of vitamin C.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
14,082
Are community dumpster is so overfilled for real why don't people quit adding to it till the city fixes dump truck . It's like a mountain of trash
 

PaladinNO

Enlightened
Joined
Jun 22, 2017
Messages
314
Location
Norway
Don't blame the electrician.
Oh, I am definitely blaming the electrician...

We wanted (still want) to get grounded outlets in the living room. It's an 80's house, and for some weird reason there seems to be more things wanting electricity now, and using a grounded socket...

So fair enough. I buy my own outlets, identical to the ones a previous company installed in our house, because I don't want to pay $50 for a $3 dual outlet. Then I contact a company to come install them, sending photos and a quick floor plan sketch, and a description of what I want them to do.

Quick résumé of the E-mails:
"We can install those outlets for you. It will cost round $500".
"Great. When can you come do it?"
"Can you first please send us a picture of your fuse box."
"Okay, sure. Here."
Silence for a week.
"I haven't heard back from you. When can you come install the new outlets?"
"Sorry, we had to check some things based on the picture of your fuse box. You need a new one, with new fuses. We can do it for $2000."
"Thank you, but no, I only want to have the outlets replaced."
"Sorry, we cannot just do the outlets. Current legislations yadda-yadda-yadda..."
"Okay, thank you, bye."

I just want to replace the outlets myself now. Just pull the main breaker to be sure, and switch them out. I know the wiring got ground in them (I have checked visually, and we had an electrical inspection confirm it awhile back...whom interestingly enough did not comment on our fuse box at all, other than it being borderline filled up).
 

PaladinNO

Enlightened
Joined
Jun 22, 2017
Messages
314
Location
Norway
How I deal with things breaking depends on what it is. I don't touch plumbing, that includes faucets Though I will disassemble and clean the exit tubing when drains aren't working properly. Bath tub and the various sinks around the house. It's a stinky hassle, but at least isn't difficult.

All the light fixtures / lamps in our house has visible wiring, and I swear by lighting with a replacable light source. And replacing a bulb is even less difficult. ^^

Replaced the cracked shower mount recently, but that was just a couple of screws (Philips...yuck!). Other than that - and the seemingly constant need for general maintenance (new coat of paint, new roof water drain gutters, new cement in the garage, fixing the garage roof due to leakage) - gee, I cannot say there is much to do at all. :rolleyes:

We are well catered for in terms of appliances. We have 2 fridges and 2 freezers, just in case. Mostly because both of them are about as old as Methuselah. We are in the market for a new washing machine, because the one we have sounds like a cow in its death throes every time (imminent pump failure), but there is no f*king way I buy a washing machine with a touch panel...which every damn single model has these days. Those breaks in 3 years, guaranteed.

One thing I partially want to break though, is my mother's TV, so I have an excuse to buy her a new one. It's an old Sony Bravia KDL-EX500, 46".
The kind Caesar and Cleopatra used when they did facetime.
 
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