Homemade gear

Hooked on Fenix

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I wanted to start a thread on homemade gear. After all, store bought products can't always compare to something customized to your needs.

This last month, I have been making homemade paracord belts for myself and family. My brother in law is into camping so I made him a belt using the Slatt's Rescue Belt/ quick deploy belt method. The belt was made of Fish and Fire 550 paracord (has jute twine and 8 lb. test fishing line with 7 strands of nylon). The buckle was a firesteel and striker/knife with whistle buckle (I got these cheap in a Camilus Nimble Knife combo pack from Walmart for $8.88.). I sealed two BB sized fishing weights in one end of the paracord. I used a piece of 1 inch nylon strap to make a loop to hold the excess strap used for tightening the belt. This loop was sewn on with a U shaped pattern to create a small pocket for a couple of fishing hooks covered up with a piece of electrical tape (to prevent the hooks from poking through). All together, the survival belt gives him a fishing kit with 60+ feet of 8 lb. fishing line, 2 weights, and two hooks; a whistle, and a knife/firesteel striker, a firesteel, and 60+ feet of 7 strand 550 lb. paracord (and a piece of 7/16 inch climb spec webbing).

For my autistic brother, I make his belt with two glow in the dark whistle buckles, 550 paracord with glow in the dark tracers, a 7/16 inch strap and a coin cell headlight for a sort of buckle. I made it so the glow in the dark buckles could be detached and the inside ends attached together to be used as a buckle light or as a headlight.

For mine, I made a hybrid version with the fish and fire paracord, weights, hooks, buckle light/headlight, and two firesteel/striker/whistle buckles (had to have two like buckles for the headlight setup to work). This gives me a decent emergency survival kit with just a belt.

What homemade products have you guys cooked up?
 

Borad

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I sewed two buttons on the waist of my short pants so I could button on a short piece of belt that I cut. That way I can attach a pouch without wearing a belt. I think I did it so I don't have put my belt through all those pesky loops again when I change pants. A new benefit for me now that I have a backpack with a waist belt is that I won't have a belt buckle to interfere with the backpack belt. "But won't the backpack belt squish your pouch" you ask? No, because I put Malice clips on my pouch so the pouch sits lower and the backpack belt can go directly on the belt.

e6wz1h.jpg


Oh, and I made that little D ring on the pouch out of bailing wire and attached it to the elastic pencil holder.
 
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Poppy

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This last month, I have been making homemade paracord belts for myself and family.
Good for you man! :thumbsup:

Every now and then I look into making one myself, and then get side-tracked.

My waist line goes up and down a little, and those survival clips you used are nice and compact. Is there a way to use them and have the belt be adjustable?
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Good for you man! :thumbsup:

Every now and then I look into making one myself, and then get side-tracked.

My waist line goes up and down a little, and those survival clips you used are nice and compact. Is there a way to use them and have the belt be adjustable?

All three belts I made are adjustable. The trick is to use two buckles or a buckle and a ladderlock buckle. One end of a buckle gets tied to the paracord. The other end of another buckle (or ladderlock buckle) gets tied to the other end of the paracord. The remaining sides of the buckles (or buckle and ladderlock buckle) get attached to a 1/2 inch or 9/16 inch strap. Sew the strap to the end of one of the buckles. Pass the other end of the strap through the remaining buckle end. That end is the side you can adjust the length of your belt with. If you go with the two buckle method, use one buckle for attaching to the paracord ends (one part of the buckle on each end), and one buckle for the strap (sew one end, run the other end through the buckle). Then connect the buckles together. As I did, you can add on a compact headlight to the strap (make it long enough to wrap around your head) and you'll have a headlight for an emergency. The only drawback is when you need to use the belt as a headlight instead of a buckle light, the belt won't be long enough to wrap around your waist.
 

Poppy

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hooked on fenix,
Thanks so much for the replay, and detailed explanation. Somehow, though, I can't wrap my head around how you did this. I am sure that you can't post a picture, therefore... PM sent.

This weekend, one of my grandkids will be the FIRE-Lighter in a cub scout team building event. He was a little challenged getting enough sparks from a flint and steel set I bought, so I made a little modification to the striker.

I cut a hacksaw blade into two three inch pieces, and taped them together, side by side, with two pieces of electrical tape between them to act as a little bit of a spacer. He gets many more sparks than he did before.
 

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