How 'bout those water batteries?

bykfixer

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Good, bad, somewhere in between?

Sounds like a nice idea. Let's see where it goes. The Beta Max or VHS route?

 

idleprocess

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As I understand it the "fuel cell" in these sort of lights:
  • Activates with water
  • Once activated, runs continuously until the water is consumed or it's fully depleted
The linked product looks to be disposable once the cell is depleted.

Amazon cells a similar "Hydra Light" brand either as a cylindrical light that accepts $10 replacement cells or as similarly-disposable mini emergency lights sold in 3 packs. Reviews are less than promising; I suspect a large slice of the good reviews are either uncritical or sock puppets / shills.
 
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Market specific emergency use product. I wonder how it does with humid air? 25 year theoretical shelf life. That is a great leave and forget till needed product.
 

idleprocess

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But do you see potential in the technology?
As @JustAnOldFashionedLEDGuy has posited the 25 year shelf life is of some interest for an emergency tool.

At the same time, lithium primary is rated to 10 years shelf life - seemingly lasts far longer in reality - stores well under a variety of environmental scenarios, can be used in a wider variety of situations, and has better apparent energy and power density than this concept.
 

alpg88

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old soviet safety rafts and flotation devices were equipped with beckons that would activate by salt water. they were as bright as 2 d size inc. bulb.
 

DIWdiver

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But do you see potential in the technology?
What technology? Unless you already know something about the technology, what does this link tell you?
1. Patented. Maybe, but do they own the patents? Do they really apply to this device? Are they violating patents?
2. Revolutionary. I doubt it.
3. Rechargable. Probably a lie.
4. No on-off switch.
5. "unique INNOVATION TO PAUSE AND RESTART electricity". In light of (4) above, this would require draining the water. Messy, maybe worse.
6. No expiration date. Just because it doesn't have one doesn't mean it doesn't need one.
7. "Longevity: Up to a lifetime depending of use." It will last for it's lifetime until you use it.
8. Add water to make it work. Smells like a fuel cell (if you already know what a fuel cell smells like).

Unless you do independent research, this advertisement tells you nothing about technology and little about the product or its behavior in use.

So let's talk about the technology. It has been suggested that this is a fuel cell technology. If that's correct (I'm no expert but I agree it almost certainly is), then we should be referencing copious links to previous discussions of this technology. Fuel cells have certainly been discussed ad infinitum in other locations. No need to repeat that here.

If there is other technology in this product, by all means let's identify it so we can discuss it as appropriate.
 

fulee9999

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from doing a bit of research these just seems like lead-acid batteries where you add the water which starts the reaction. so it's basically a standard battery, essentially negating the "no chemicals" statement. a novel idea, but hand-crank flashlights ( the old style, that have no internal batteries, you have a direct electrical connection from the power generating motor to the light source ) would last far longer considering shelf-life.
 

bykfixer

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I started this one since another one in another place about another subject seemed to be going in this direction. Nothing wrong with that mind you, but in the CPF spirit I thought it best to create a side track for the conversation to continue while keeping the other one on the rails of its subject matter.

Realizing the product I cited was a "as seen on tv" type of product I just pondered the idea that the technology used to produce the electricity that fuels the LED was something worth considering with an open mind. Like early LED's, when some put their skills into the lab and tweaked chemicals it slowly led to what we have today. Very slowly at first. Like when CF Burgess used his spare time in his basement to play with certain combinations he was able to vastly improve the new technology called dry cell battery.

I remember PK saying "when I developed the anti-roll head on a 6P they threw hammers at me saying that stupid looking idea will never catch on".

I guess my thoughts were is this an idea that may develop and flourish like the VHS tape did long ago or will it disappear like the Beta Max version of the video tape? To dismiss it in its infancy would be a shame imo.
 
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As @JustAnOldFashionedLEDGuy has posited the 25 year shelf life is of some interest for an emergency tool.

At the same time, lithium primary is rated to 10 years shelf life - seemingly lasts far longer in reality - stores well under a variety of environmental scenarios, can be used in a wider variety of situations, and has better apparent energy and power density than this concept.

Similar products (this is not new) have 25 year shelf life. That seems to be independent of storage, as long as they are keep sealed.

Lithium have long storage at room temperature. Elevate that temperature and the life declines quick.
 

idleprocess

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Similar products (this is not new) have 25 year shelf life. That seems to be independent of storage, as long as they are keep sealed.
I remember Radio Shack selling an emergency flashlight with special long shelf life cells one had to physically activate. I recall they were roughly D cell sized and one activated by twisting the top ~⅓ of the housing, which was plastic. I've not been able to locate any information on the specifics of the cell (chemistry, what the twisting action accomplished), suggesting it was not very successful. I'd be surprised if the shelf life was anything impressive by modern standards.

I recall SciPlus listed the cells a few years back. I've slept since then but I do recall the description implying that due to age they were more curiosities than useful consumables.
 
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I will repeat again, those long lithium storage rates are at room temperature. If you have elevated storage temperatures, kiss that long storage life good bye. It is a niche leave and forget product. Not for me, but is what it is.
 
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I started this one since another one in another place about another subject seemed to be going in this direction. Nothing wrong with that mind you, but in the CPF spirit I thought it best to create a side track for the conversation to continue while keeping the other one on the rails of its subject matter.

Realizing the product I cited was a "as seen on tv" type of product I just pondered the idea that the technology used to produce the electricity that fuels the LED was something worth considering with an open mind. Like early LED's, when some put their skills into the lab and tweaked chemicals it slowly led to what we have today. Very slowly at first. Like when CF Burgess used his spare time in his basement to play with certain combinations he was able to vastly improve the new technology called dry cell battery.

I remember PK saying "when I developed the anti-roll head on a 6P they threw hammers at me saying that stupid looking idea will never catch on".

I guess my thoughts were is this an idea that may develop and flourish like the VHS tape did long ago or will it disappear like the Beta Max version of the video tape? To dismiss it in its infancy would be a shame imo.

It's almost as if you haven't read the replies or took a few minutes to Google this ancient technology. :)

I think the bit of negative feedback you are getting on this thread is due to CPF community expectation that it's members at least do a modicum of external research in addition to relying on the community for answers.
 

bykfixer

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It's almost as if you haven't read the replies or took a few minutes to Google this ancient technology. :)

I think the bit of negative feedback you are getting on this thread is due to CPF community expectation that it's members at least do a modicum of external research in addition to relying on the community for answers.
Wow! That's pretty good. Another jewel of a post.
 
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Wow! That's pretty good. Another jewel of a post.

Likewise.

your-very-welcome-meme.jpg
 
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