how did are ancesters get buy with candles

raggie33

raggie33

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just for fun i bought a candle lantern well 3 of them. it still put out less light then my 60 day battery latern puts out on low. ps is 1 candle power tge light of on candle id guess yes. but im wrong a lot
 
ChrisGarrett

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just for fun i bought a candle lantern well 3 of them. it still put out less light then my 60 day battery latern puts out on low. ps is 1 candle power tge light of on candle id guess yes. but im wrong a lot

With all of the doo-dads I have here, when my power went out for 84 hours (3.5 days) I used little candles in my rooms and they were fine. 3 per room was the cat's ***.

Chris
 
raggie33

raggie33

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one of my lanterns has candle flicker mode. its mind of cool
 
raggie33

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With all of the doo-dads I have here, when my power went out for 84 hours (3.5 days) I used little candles in my rooms and they were fine. 3 per room was the cat's ***.

Chris

ps i do have to admit i dont know what the cats *** means lol
 
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richbuff

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How did our ancestors get by with candles?

They managed to get by ok/fine, because they were self-skilled and self sufficient; that is, they were not dependent on society for survival.
 
thermal guy

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I burn a candle in my hallway every day.Just for The glow of it but I have many old fashioned candle holders and I can easily get around at night with one of them. I have a candle lantern that hold 4-5 candles and it’s almost to bright


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raggie33

raggie33

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How did our ancestors get by with candles?

They managed to get by ok/fine, because they were self-skilled and self sufficient; that is, they were not dependent on society for survival.

we are still self skillled a diff skill for sure but still a skill
 
raggie33

raggie33

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I burn a candle in my hallway every day.Just for The glow of it but I have many old fashioned candle holders and I can easily get around at night with one of them. I have a candle lantern that hold 4-5 candles and it’s almost to bright

they kind of scare me
 
turbodog

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How did our ancestors get by with candles?

They managed to get by ok/fine, because they were self-skilled and self sufficient; that is, they were not dependent on society for survival.

And lived to an average age of 30 something...

Were more dependent than you think unless they mined their own ore, forged plows, forged weapons, made gunpowder, mined salt, etc.
 
Lynx_Arc

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Two things helped in the days of candles:
1) people went to bed and were up early so they only were up and about in the daytime.
2) oil based lanterns were used that put out a lot more light than candles did. The lanterns has a larger wick that was retractable so you could adjust the light output some. Until LEDs came about many were still using some sort of fuel or gas lantern like kerosene, propane, etc. Some houses and streets were lit by gas lanterns too as many houses when I was growing up had gas/mantle based yard lights.
When LEDs came about I stopped using candles altogether after awhile when I had enough batteries a single 5mm LED can sip power for days on end and provide more output than a candle. The only advantage then was candles and fuel lanterns make heat which is a disadvantage also in the summer or indoors when a larger gas lantern can need more air. I quit using candles because of the fire hazard mostly as a lot of houses are burned down due to careless use of candles and fuel lanterns.
 
Tasky

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just for fun i bought a candle lantern well 3 of them. it still put out less light then my 60 day battery latern puts out on low. ps is 1 candle power tge light of on candle id guess yes. but im wrong a lot
Night-adjusted eyes can see a lot with minimal light. On a clear night with a Half Moon or greater, I can walk the dogs without the need for a torch.
Also, lanterns and sconces often featured polished metal reflectors, which throw a lot more of that 1cp in a useful direction.
 
Jean-Luc Descarte

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Short answer: they didn't.

As Lynx_Arc said, people in these old times got to bed at sundown and rose at first daylight, because fire-based lighting was so limited. But when they needed light, candles were not the first pick, because they were expensive. Beeswax was almost a luxury item, and wicks needed quite a bit of tending-to such as trimming and snuffing. And their lights were not bright enough to offer significant illumination when used one at a time anyway. As such they were used more as table and desk lighting, like our not-so-old tiny-bulbed desk lamps. (Candles as we know them – cheap, made of paraffin with self-trimming cotton wicks – are little more than a century old!)

Oil lanterns were more potent, but they were a high initial investment and tended to spread both soot (when used incorrectly) and smell (no matter what) with the fuels used back then - tallow from rendered animal fat, and fish oil, mostly. Sperm whale blubber was the cream of the crop for lighting because of its clean stink-less burn, but sperm whales were hard to take down and that drove the prices to nobility-only levels.

Torches, curiously, were hardly ever used for fixed lighting, Hollywood got them completely wrong. As the actual burning part (typically a cloth soaked in oil wrapped around the wooden tip) had a large surface area, it burned bright but only for a short time, a matter of minutes. In this sense, they were used the same way as our dear flashlights. See why it's so fitting that non-Americans call them 'torches'? :grin2: The sconce served to keep it in an easily found location, like flashlight cradles do for us now.

What the poor used were something called rush lights. They're simple to make (peel the central stem out of a rush plant, let it dry and dip it in molten tallow several times to soak in as much as possible) and cheap even in bulk, and burn brighter than candles (think of the flame on a Zippo lighter) but for longer than torches. If more light was needed, both ends of the rushlight could be lit, though that obviously halved its burn time. (This is where the "burning the candle at both ends" actually comes from.)

But yeah, most of these were only an accessory in case you needed to do something at night, which wasn't often.

There was no light pollution back then.
This too. When there's no ambient miasma or glare to drown out your little flame's light, you do not need much. Heck, check out yourself during a big blackout sometime how little light you need to see by. When a tree fell on my old house's powerline and I was out of light for a whole week, at night I only used the moonlight-like 0,1% mode of my Convoys. :candle:
 
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Scotty321

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just for fun i bought a candle lantern well 3 of them. it still put out less light then my 60 day battery latern puts out on low. ps is 1 candle power tge light of on candle id guess yes. but im wrong a lot

IMO, tech for candles has mostly been forgotten and created for either more popular niche categories or replicated in style but not so much in function.

If you want a candle for decent light, get the long, thin candles that don't last as long as those thick scented candles or survival candles. The flame is higher and a significant part of the light isn't blocked by the fat, waxy base. You can pickup inexpensive candelabrums at discount stores like TJMaxx to experiment. Then look at lanterns with 1. a reflector (who would have thought), and 2. glass that is thicker, and if you need more spill, maybe even beveled... something that acts as a lense with the desired characteristics for your task specific purpose (big suprise there too). I was lucky enough to find a clearance "stylistic" one from a furniture store that still had some of these characteristics back in the day, and it worked very well when the power went out.

Edit: Also, in addition to the long, thin candles and lantern characteristics mentioned above, if the lantern has good airflow (cold air entering bottom and hot air exiting top, it will also stretch the flame out, providing more lumen... of course this might make the candle burn faster.

Also remember that many people didn't have multiple bright lights and bulbs in every room, streetlights were limited, particularly outside of the cities, and many outdoor activites ceased at sunset.

You might find it interesting to check out the history of the Fresnel lens in lighthouses, and the corresponding light sources.



One day people will be able to reproduce miniature suns that follow them around everywhere, and see an led mounted on the side of a piece of plastic hooked up to a battery and say "This sucks, how did anyone get by with flashlights back in the day?" :D
 
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Katherine Alicia

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I love candles and have at least a 1000 of them at any given time, there`s just something cozy about them. I thought I`d do an experiment one day, and see just how viable it was to do embroidery by candle light the same as it was done in the 1800`s when women would sit and do needle work by candle light. Well... it`s not impossible is all I`m going to say, but it`s certainly not easy!
I have seen some setups for doing specifically this that uses mirrors or magnifying lenses, I can appreciate the need for something like that though, gotta love the Victorians :)
 
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wweiss

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I love candles and have at least a 1000 of them at any given time, there`s just something cozy about them. I thought I`d do an experiment one day, and see just how viable it was to do embroidery by candle light the same as it was done in the 1800`s when women would sit and do needle work by candle light. Well... it`s not impossible is all I`m going to say, but it`s certainly not easy!
I have seen some setups for doing specifically this that uses mirrors or magnifying lenses, I can appreciate the need for something like that though, gotta love the Victorians :)

As they had nothing else and no other choices, they made do and worked to a different schedule. An HDS high end candle was one that didn’t sputter and lasted hours.
 
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WalkIntoTheLight

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A decent candle flame is a few lumens. With a few candles spread around a room, that's more than enough light. Also, people didn't live in 3000 square foot houses back then, so they were much easier to light.

One of the problems with candles is fire, obviously. However, one of the problems with modern high-output LED lights is also fire. ;)
 
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Vemice

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Maybe they used the light from their cell phones.
 
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It's always interesting how much light some people *think* they need. I honestly believe they're just unaccustomed to the dark, fear it as an "unknown", and would quickly grow more comfortable with more exposure to it.
When I was a Boy Scout, my friends and I would go for walks in the dark, ramble around in the woods, raid other Scouts' camps, and play pranks on them, stuff like that.
We didn't use flashlights. You can't use a flashlight to sneak into people's campsites and tents when they're sitting around a fire a few yards away! Those same people could look away from the fire, and right at you, without you being seen, because their night vision had been destroyed by watching the fire.

When I was in the military, we did nighttime land nav in woods and swamps. We had those old 2D "right angle" flashlights with a red filter that we were only allowed to use for checking our maps when changing course at a waypoint.
You know what we used the rest of the time? Nothing.
That was not fun; it was actually pretty terrifying, sometimes, but it'd sure expand your comfort zone.

As paratroopers, we did all our jumps and mock missions at night. There'd be a blinking light set up, because we were just training, would have to roll up our parachutes and carry them to a dropoff point, and had to know where that was.
What did we use to get around in the dark, though? Nothing.
Well, moonlight, at least when it wasn't cloudy, since drop zones are, by necessity, large open areas.

Even now I'll hike with as little as <3 lumens, though, and use .06 lumens in my shelter after my eyes adapt to the dark.
There's nothing extraordinary about it. Zebralight has brightness modes as low as .01 lumen, a tiny fraction of what a candle produces, and they only offer that because, in complete darkness, that is a usable amount of light.
 
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WalkIntoTheLight

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When I was a Boy Scout, my friends and I would go for walks in the dark, ramble around in the woods, raid other Scouts' camps, and play pranks on them, stuff like that.

Sure, when I was young, I used to ride my bike around at night without a light. But, it was a suburb that had lights around, so it wasn't really that dark. Plus, young eyes are much better at seeing in the dark than old eyes.

That said, a truly dark area (well away from any cities and towns) on a moonless night is extremely dark. If you're in the woods, it's pitch black. You can't see anything, at all. Not even your hand right in front of your face. Moving is far too dangerous. Without a light, you're stuck in that spot until dawn.
 

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