Hurricane Ida

Wurkkos

idleprocess

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It doesn't take as much as most think to protect against winds like that. Double layer 3/4 plywood ran at 90 degree angles. Double studs. Anchored to floor. That's directly from fema(?) specs.

That's pretty much it. Some additional considerations:
  • Hurricane brackets are obligatory
  • A sheet steel layer is also recommended by some sources - will defeat pretty much all missiles that storms throw
  • Screwing the whole thing together will add strength
  • A steel inswing door with deadbolts high and low on the door
Would make for a hell of a secure shed if built standalone outdoors on a slab - eschew windows and keep the roof overhang to a minimum, natch.
 

jtr1962

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That's pretty much it. Some additional considerations:
  • Hurricane brackets are obligatory
  • A sheet steel layer is also recommended by some sources - will defeat pretty much all missiles that storms throw
  • Screwing the whole thing together will add strength
  • A steel inswing door with deadbolts high and low on the door
Would make for a hell of a secure shed if built standalone outdoors on a slab - eschew windows and keep the roof overhang to a minimum, natch.
That's good to know. I was thinking you needed foot-thick reinforced concrete to withstand 150 mph winds.

Shutters for the windows would be a must, I imagine, given that anything the wind picks up will become a missile.
 

idleprocess

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Shutters for the windows would be a must, I imagine, given that anything the wind picks up will become a missile.

Eh, windows are not recommended for any structure that acts as a storm shelter - even if it switch-hits as a storage shed. The usual reason for a window on a storage shed is passive illumination of the interior - as such you're going to want it to be un-shuttered all of the time. I've never sought shelter in a storm shelter, but I gather that one often wants access to them in a hurry under ... suboptimal ... circumstances. A window on such a structure would be a massive liability since livestock, the roofs of nearby buildings, billboards, etc may have already started circulating in the air and securing the shutter is one more thing to do when you may have run for the building in the dark and count yourself lucky to make it. If one had a powered security shutter that was always closed unless the shed was being accessed under normal conditions ... OK ... but that's a lot of additional complexity and likely still a liability relative to the walls.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Heard the storm had wind gusts to around 185 mph. All of New Orleans is out of power except for generators. At that wind speed and with New Orleans being below sea level, I’d keep the waterproof flashlights handy and stay near something you can float on. For those in the area, my prayers are with you. Stay safe.
 

turbodog

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That's good to know. I was thinking you needed foot-thick reinforced concrete to withstand 150 mph winds.

Shutters for the windows would be a must, I imagine, given that anything the wind picks up will become a missile.

Steel shelter. F-5 rated. Anchored to slab. Noisy just a bit though.

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Stress_Test

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Steel shelter. F-5 rated. Anchored to slab. Noisy just a bit though.

But for a hurricane (in N.O. for example), wouldn't you have to mount it up like 15 feet off the ground to stay out of the storm surge and flood?

Or else make it waterproof and add a snorkel (yikes).
 

Stress_Test

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You would evacuate.

You're damn right I would. I would not want to sit on a little patch of sunken land between a big lake and a river when there's a hurricane plowing towards me.

looks like the levys have failed! im distraght

Looks like it was two, maybe three? The little live news clip I just saw had a banner stating two locations where levees had failed, then switched to another saying that <name> Levee had failed.

Reading a news article earlier today, some official down there was quoted saying something to the effect of: the levees will be fine so long as we don't get an extreme worst case event.

So, of course, the worse-case event happened! It looked as though the Cat 4 hurricane basically slid up next to N.O. and just parked there all day. Crazy. They said Ida remained at Cat 4 strength for something like twice as many hours while over land vs. Katrina, if I remember the article right. Hard to imagine.
 

bykfixer

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There was an F2 tornado that hit my city in '94, where the weather folks stated it had winds up to 150 mph. After the thing went through there were 2x4's driven completely through cars, from demolished homes a quarter mile away. The WalMart at the time had concrete blocks filled with concrete and had re-inforcement bars between rows. It looked like a giant router had cut through it like a hot knife through butter. A fire hydrant in front of the WalMart has been ripped out of the ground and driven through an Arbys restaraunt about 300 yards away. It was the darndest thing I has seen in my life at the time as my coworkers and I helped clean up the carnage.

The city of Petersburg had an entire city block flattened, gone. Now my point is that was something that lasted a few seconds. A hurricane can deliver that for a sustained length of time. And that is why people should get the heck out instead of sticking around. Board up, and leave.
 

jtr1962

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jtr1962

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+

Really diffuses the whole 'electrified everything' thinking...
Gas & cash will always be king
More localized generation (i.e. wind, solar, plus battery back up), plus a more robust grid is the answer here. It shouldn't be that one point of failure can knock out an entire city for weeks.

Important to remember without electricity the gas stations aren't pumping out any gas (unless they have generators).

Yeah, cash is definitely king now. Debit and credit cards can't work when power and communications are down.
 

idleprocess

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Really diffuses the whole 'electrified everything' thinking...
Gas & cash will always be king
The electric grid is essential to 21st century life - especially in an area with any sort of population density. Water in particular demands steady electric power for purification, distribution, and sewage treatment. Otherwise, the modern economy doesn't provision for the electrical grid to be out for more than about a two month span at the absolute outside at some critical facilities (telecom building I worked in once ran on diesels for almost 2 weeks during the big ice storms of 2013 - and I'm confident that required topping off the tanks at least once) - far less for most locations that have any provision for backup power beyond the ~30 minutes that UPSs tend to be sized for.

Even if you've got cash, no small number of retailers are unprepared to handle transactions without power and comms. JIT logistics all but guarantee that local stocks will be heavily depleted without routine resupply from afar anyway.

Hardening the grid to reflect its life- and economic-critical nature would be a good thing - albeit a very time-consuming thing. We can all prepare individually, of course, but that's an individually expensive thing for what you get and it does little for the rest of society.
 
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orbital

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More localized generation (i.e. wind, solar, plus battery back up), plus a more robust grid is the answer here. It shouldn't be that one point of failure can knock out an entire city for weeks.

Important to remember without electricity the gas stations aren't pumping out any gas (unless they have generators).

Yeah, cash is definitely king now. Debit and credit cards can't work when power and communications are down.
The electric grid is essential to 21st century life - especially in an area with any sort of population density. Water in particular demands steady electric power for purification, distribution, and sewage treatment. Otherwise, the modern economy doesn't provision for the electrical grid to be out for more than about a two month span at the absolute outside at some critical facilities (telecom building I worked in once ran on diesels for almost 2 weeks during the big ice storms of 2013 - and I'm confident that required topping off the tanks at least once) - far less for most locations that have any provision for backup power beyond the ~30 minutes that UPSs tend to be sized for.

Even if you've got cash, no small number of retailers are unprepared to handle transactions without power and comms. JIT logistics all but guarantee that local stocks will be heavily depleted without routine resupply from afar anyway.

Hardening the grid to reflect its life- and economic-critical nature would be a good thing - albeit a very time-consuming thing. We can all prepare individually, of course, but that's an individually expensive thing for what you get and it does little for the rest of society.
+

My wording was iffy.
What I was meaning/thinking = a young family and their two cars are EV,, you start to run out of options fast when the grid is uprooted.
I'm all about alternative energy & storage,, it's just that there has to be back-up plan(s)

Gas powered generators really show their value during major weather issues.
 
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