Hurricane Season

Poppy

Poppy

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No, not flimsy... Just not "flashaholic" material..... or perhaps Im just not enough of a flashaholic.....:thinking:

ahhh.... Maybe i'll go grab one tomorrow...as long as it's Poppy approved...now Im a little more interested. Wonder what will happen with 4-8 lithium AA's....?


Which one? http://www.energizer.com/lighting/light-fusion-technology

I like the simple flashlight one and was in the store awhile ago thinking how i would mount it to a backpack strap... But the beam is worthless... wish it was just the flat light part.

100 lumens - 20HRS - 1 meter - IPX4... Not bad:

http://www.energizer.com/flashlight...light-fusion-technology-2-in-1-led-flashlight

I can't comment on the 2 in 1 or 3 in 1, because I don't have either.

For a lantern though, I like the larger fold up one. Especially if you want to run a lantern at more than 100 lumens. Due to the large flat surface, it produces less glare than traditional LED lanterns.
I see that there are now two versions... a 300 lumen, and a newer 330 lumen lantern. The 300 lumen is more a neutral white, whereas the 330 is cooler white, and it does draw a little more amperage. I prefer the softer white, but it isn't a big deal.

All of the lanterns have a demo mode. All you have to do is take the batteries out of the lantern for ten? seconds and put them back in. That's no fault of the lantern, it just "is what it is" and it isn't a detraction to the lantern's qualities.

Regarding running on L91s, the light runs on 4 in series, or 2 sets of four, in parallel. So the voltage difference between 4AAs in series, and 4*L91s, won't be that great. I can only imagine that the light can handle them. There is no warning on the box stating NOT to use lithium AAs.
 
scout24

scout24

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Swamplite- I thoroughly understand the gravity and seriousness of the situation, and think that's a solid plan. Just a helluva visual, you know? :) No offense...
 
Poppy

Poppy

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I can't agree here,especially the bigger one is certainly Flimsy and badly made.

I got 2 of them and it has taken 4 to get 2 good ones,new off the shelf too.
The plastic is thin and rough,the finish not great,the switch is just odd and takes some getting used to its actual button location under the rubber and the instructions are terrible too!
The light comes setup for a store demo mode which is not really described at all aside from how you disable it?It turns out that the light will just turn otself off after a minute until you do disable this mode but it does say anything about that anywhere except that you can disable the mode you can not understand? Just Odd!

On mine the little **** that hold the battery door closed were broken off on 2 out of 4 that I got home,not too inspiring or convenient and something to be careful with in use.

All that said,I still like them for the function and convenience I hope they provide for the price with area lighting when needed.

I don't feel like the ability to have to send them back for lifetime service is some huge feature as they seem like they might easily require a trip or two or just be junked if not treated carefully.

Hope I am wrong too!

I'll agree that it is not the most rugged lantern on the market. They just have to be handled somewhat respectfully. Even our $100 lights only are rated to pass a six foot drop test. AND that doesn't mean that it won't be marred, but rather that it will continue to work. I'd bet that the two that you got home that were broken, were broken in the store by someone who didn't have enough sense to turn the thumb screws to release the cover, and snapped them off. They probably had to use a pocket knife, or keys to get enough force to snap them.

It seems that no matter how well you make a widget, someone will figure out a way to break it. Notice how Rayovac changed the name of their indestructible lights to "Virtually" Indestructible. Now... if you want to pack the weight of a ruggedized lantern... get one of them :rolleyes:
 
V

Vinniec5

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The Streamlight Siege is a solid choice and definitely one of the better built lanterns out there. I have both the D and AA models. Great runtime on both and in a pinch you can run AA to D adapters and run on AA Eneloops. With the hooks on top and bottom it's an easy tiedown with paracord. plus the are well sealed against water and float.
 
Swamplite

Swamplite

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The Streamlight Siege is a solid choice and definitely one of the better built lanterns out there. I have both the D and AA models. Great runtime on both and in a pinch you can run AA to D adapters and run on AA Eneloops. With the hooks on top and bottom it's an easy tiedown with paracord. plus the are well sealed against water and float.
I would like to add that the entire globe assembly can be removed and hung upside down. This way it can be used like an overhead light bulb.
 
Swamplite

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Swamplite- I thoroughly understand the gravity and seriousness of the situation, and think that's a solid plan. Just a helluva visual, you know? :) No offense...
I will be sure to take pics Scout.:)
 
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ForrestChump

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I have the D model seige and agree - it seems like a great little unit. I stage mine in my laundry room which is where I would take cover in the event of a tornado.

I really like the SL Seige...... 1) It seams light a good design with excellent runtimes. 2) It uses ambiguous D cell batteries. ( Or the 3 AA model )

The problem is the alkaleakes. I hate storing cells outside a unit to prevent leaks or simply for parasitic drain. This is counter intuitive of an emergency light.

For some reason, I am inclined to think that the D model is less likely to leak as it only has 1 cell. Are 1 cell alkalines less inclined to leak? I have read this but am uncertain.

I would opt for the 3 AA - but lithium batteries are not listed, and every time ( I know of ) SL has a model that can handle the extra few ounces of power from lithium primaries they advertise it on the "fact sheet" and often in the specs.

PS - Rechargeable are not an option for me.

Thoughts?
 
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reppans

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For some reason, I am inclined to think that the D model is less likely to leak as it only has 1 cell. Are 1 cell alkalines less inclined to leak? I have read this but am uncertain.

Yes, single cell formats are less likely to leak than multi-cell formats in series. The difference is the reverse charge scenario where one cell dies significantly before the other, and the stronger cell starts pushing current through the dead cell in reverse polarity. This will cause an alkaline to leak, and a CR123 primary to fail "spectacularly" (ie, vent with flame) :D. The more the cells are mismatched, the greater the power behind the reverse charge.... etc.

Here's my keychain D-cell emergency lantern ;)

18382950464_d90c897f4d_z.jpg
 
Poppy

Poppy

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Yes, single cell formats are less likely to leak than multi-cell formats in series. The difference is the reverse charge scenario where one cell dies significantly before the other, and the stronger cell starts pushing current through the dead cell in reverse polarity. This will cause an alkaline to leak, and a CR123 primary to fail "spectacularly" (ie, vent with flame) :D. The more the cells are mismatched, the greater the power behind the reverse charge.... etc.

Here's my keychain D-cell emergency lantern ;)

18382950464_d90c897f4d_z.jpg

Great explanation Reppans!

I guess you don't worry about a leaking cell getting stuck in that host, eh? :thumbsup:
 
A

AVService

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Yes, single cell formats are less likely to leak than multi-cell formats in series. The difference is the reverse charge scenario where one cell dies significantly before the other, and the stronger cell starts pushing current through the dead cell in reverse polarity. This will cause an alkaline to leak, and a CR123 primary to fail "spectacularly" (ie, vent with flame) :D. The more the cells are mismatched, the greater the power behind the reverse charge.... etc.

Here's my keychain D-cell emergency lantern ;)

18382950464_d90c897f4d_z.jpg
How about a better pic of that contraption so we can see how it is constructed exactly McGuyver?!?!?!
 
R

reppans

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Great explanation Reppans!

I guess you don't worry about a leaking cell getting stuck in that host, eh? :thumbsup:

Thanks Poppy... I have to thank you for turning me on to the virtues of D cells for emergency use - $1 a piece, 10yr shelf life, energy of an 18650 (at least at the low lumens I prefer) and yeah.... I don't have to worry about leaks the way I'll use them :D.

How about a better pic of that contraption so we can see how it is constructed exactly McGuyver?!?!?!

Eh? should be in the same thread that got you to say this ;)
....I too now carry foil in my wallet along with index sized cards...
 
A

AVService

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Thanks Poppy... I have to thank you for turning me on to the virtues of D cells for emergency use - $1 a piece, 10yr shelf life, energy of an 18650 (at least at the low lumens I prefer) and yeah.... I don't have to worry about leaks the way I'll use them :D.



Eh? should be in the same thread that got you to say this ;)
I just can not see enough detail in the pic to shamelessly rip-off your technique so I might pass it off as my own!
 
chaosdsm

chaosdsm

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On the original question: IMO, any decent 18650 based flashlight running 3400mAh Panasonic cells. Brands & models that give a lot of bang for the buck IMO, with my top choices bolded:
> Nitecore: EC20, P12, SRT3, MH10, Tube (tiny but under $10, decent illumination, & USB chargeable)

> ThruNite: TN12, TN20, TH10 (headlamp), Neutron 2C V2

> Fenix: E35, PD35, E05, HP25 dual-beam (one flood, one throw) headlamp, UC30 (USB chargeable)

> Zebralight: H600w Mk II (headlamp that can double as handheld), SC62w, SC62c High CRI, SC600w Mk II: NOTE: these are Neutral White, but Cool White or daylight are available for these models as well

There are several other quality brands & models, but these are the ones I've had at least a little experience with.

My lighting solution for loss of electricity - due to hurricanes, tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, etc...:

room to room: Two - Energizer® Weatheready® LED Folding Lantern (a must have IMO) $20 - 3 modes, about 200 lumen on high, up to 400 hours on 4 D cell Alkalines in nightlight mode with 180deg or 360deg lighting. note: I use 10Ah NiMH's instead of alkalines.

work light: One - Ryobi Dual Power 20W LED worklight. 1700 lumens claimed - works with any 18V ONE+ Ryobi battery pack, but I would only recommend the 4Ah/72Wh P108 battery for this light.

Search light: One - 5D Cell Maglight with Malkoff LED drop-in Upgrade running 10Ah NiMH batteries for 10+ hours continuous use & decent illumination up to 400 yards.

Multi-purpose light: One - Nitecore SRT7 (& secondary search light)

Other lights:
> Mini Maglite LED Pro 2x AA
> Bushnell Pro 2x CR123A 3 mode LED
> Rosewill LED 1x AA running 14500 Li-Ion
> Ryobi ONE+ 18V incandescent

Batteries on hand:
> Two - 36 count bricks of Rayovac AA
> One - 36 count brick of Rayovac AAA
> 8 - Eneloop Pro 2550mAh NiMH AA
> One - 10 count pack Duracell D-Cell
> Two - Panasonic 18650 3400mAh 3.7V Protected Li-Ion
> 14 - Powerizer 10Ah D-Cell 1.2V NiMH
> Six - Tenergy RCR123A 3.0V (circutry regulated) Li-Ion
> Four - SoShine 10440 (AAA sized)230mAh 3.2V LiFePO4
> Two - SoShine 16340 (CR123A sized) 600mAh 3.2V LiFePO4
> 12 - Powerizer CR123A 1300mAh 3.0V Primaries
> Two - Olight 14500 (AA sized) 750mAh Protected 3.7V Li-Ion
> Two - Ryobi ONE+ P103 18V Lithium 24Wh
> Two - Ryobi ONE+ P104 18V Lithium 48Wh
> Two - Ryobi ONE+ P108 18V Lithium+ 4Ah / 72Wh


Charging capability:
> One - 12V 15Watt nominal output Polycrystaline Solar panel.
> One - 12 V 75 ah Deep Cycle AGM Solar Battery
> One - Sunforce Pure-Sine Wave 1000 Watt Inverter
> One - Ryobi ONE+ P113 1-port charger
> One - Ryobi ONE+ P125 6-port charger (2 dead ports)
> One - Nitecore I4 4-port multi-charger
> One - Nitecore D2 2-port multi-charger
> One - Maha MH-C808M 8-port AAA through D cell NiMH/NiCad charger
> One - TroyBilt 5550 running watt (8550W start) gasoline powered generator - primarily for powering the fridge during outages, gives about 16 - 24 hours per tank (7.5 gal) depending on how much the fridge runs. EDIT: actually I think it's 16 max & 24hrs is at pure idle with no load, but I didn't write proper notes when I tested it :( Numbers were extrapolated from 1.5 gallons of gas BTW, so some margin for error there as well.

I can last several weeks without power & still have portable light & battery powered tools!!!
 
Last edited:
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ForrestChump

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Yes, single cell formats are less likely to leak than multi-cell formats in series. The difference is the reverse charge scenario where one cell dies significantly before the other, and the stronger cell starts pushing current through the dead cell in reverse polarity. This will cause an alkaline to leak, and a CR123 primary to fail "spectacularly" (ie, vent with flame) :D. The more the cells are mismatched, the greater the power behind the reverse charge.... etc.

Here's my keychain D-cell emergency lantern ;)


Yes, what you said was floating around in my mind like soggy alphabet soup, thanks for clearing that up for me.

Also, we want front shots of that D Cell doohicky and where we can get one!
 

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