Idea about waterproofing, please discuss it.

Barbarin

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One of my projects is making a scuba flashlight using a Eternalight Ergo with 8 LEDs or a Photon Fusion. As you now the critical point is the switching, and the only reliable switch for a multimode is the magnetic option, wich I don't like very much. The rubber option was one of my favorites, but there is a problem with the pressure, unless we increase the internal pressure of the flashlight. I've been thinking about the idea of waterproofing a flashlight circuit by filling it with a dielectric liquid (oil, cooling liquid...)At first the idea seems interesting, and the liquid will help in the cooling and the maintenance of the circuit, avoiding corrosion. The temperature curve should be softer,and if the flashlight is made of aluminium the interchange of heat
must improve.
Now is time for the "techies" to tell me why the idea is not so good, or just to recomend whatever they think about my homemade ideas.
Thanks in advance.
 

Harrkev

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Aug 30, 2001
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443
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Colorado Springs, CO
Actually, there was some discussion on this very subject on the forum hosted by the people who built the Eternalight. Cruise on over to www.techass.com, and check out the archives of their discussions. One person suggested using mineral oil.

Hope this helps.
 

Tater Rocket

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Jun 25, 2001
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Location
Close to St. Louis, MO, school at Rolla
Yeah, that mineral oil guy was I. I bought a bottle of it, and it is sitting about 2 feet away. I have not tried using it yet on a flashlight, though I should. If the button on the flashlight needs to be pushed in, or if the head has to be screwed down, I don't think it will work all that well if you fill it completely full because you cannot compress the oil (ok, you can, just a very minute amount), so you won't be able to press the buttons all the way in or screw the head all the way down. But, if you leave a little bit of air, you should be able to compress it enough to work. Give it a try, who knows, it may work. Even if I tried it, I have no way of testing it any time soon as I probably won't be going diving until summer when we go on vacation. Even then, it would only be to 60 feet or so.
I'd say go for it, but YMMV.

Spudgunr
 

lightlover

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Feb 28, 2001
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London, UK (Parallel Universe)
Senor, Viva Espana !

Check out this link:
How to make an underwater calculator. @ http://barney.gonzaga.edu/~rguerra/calc/underwater/underwater.html

I'm trying to increase the waterproofing of an E2.
This is only intended to make it submergible, say to 1 meter. It seems that there are Silicone products available which will make flexible seals, and then allow the components to be removed/replaced.
The adhesives technology term for this characteristic is "bond to be made then broken/ re-made".

Anyone know the chemical which dramatically changes colour in the presence of small amounts of water ? I want to test it out that way.

lightlover
smile.gif
 

Barbarin

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Joined
Jul 30, 2001
Messages
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Location
Pamplona- NA- Spain
There is no problem filling all the flashlight with liquid if the switch is under a ruber membrane. As you know the liquid is not compresible, but when you push down 2mm the button excatly the same amount of liquid you are moving under it will push up another membrane (another button's membrane).This is easy to understand when there are two membranes, but it does work even with one only, unless you apply pressure
all over the hole membrane. That is because when you press down a part of it the rest of the parts will go up to compensate, but the volume will be exactly the same.
Well, my english is not impresive at all, but I hope you will understand.
 
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