In the USA is it legal to cuss out a cop?

Monocrom

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Why not just say "dark skinned fellow with black hair"? (Assuming he had black hair.) Unless he was a light skinned fellow with blond hair or tan skinned fellow with brown hair that should invoke a mental visual without mentioning the R word in any form.

When somebody asks me to describe a person that's what I do. If they ask what race they were I answer that with what I believe is their race but find giving a description to be more informative.

My wife's youngest son for example is a skinny pale skin fellow with a big orange afro. His best friend is a heavy set dark skinned fellow with dark brown short kinky hair.
I tell it like it is with no BS or sugar-coating. Straight to the point. I do that in real life. I do that here on CPF as well. Gotten me in trouble a few times. Not just here.

Lost out on a good job about a decade ago because my potential boss asked me an honest question, I gave him an honest reply. Wasn't even anything controversial. But he didn't like my honest reply. Looking back now, I can honestly say it wasn't a huge loss. Good job, but not great. Came with an almost 2-hour commute one way! Easily the worst part of the job. Now I'm at another good job. With the commute being about 25 minutes one way. So in the end, I stayed true to myself and it didn't really cost me anything.

I'm me. If anyone doesn't like that I'm a straight shooter who tells it like it is, well; that's their problem to deal with. Not mine. I have my core group of loved ones made up of friends and family. Not looking to make friends with every new person I meet. Last one, intrestingly about 2 years ago. Neo-hippie chick who gives off very strong Baby-girl vibes and has a good heart. Sadly, gets very depressed during the Winter months. Unlikely friendship. Just sort of developed. That's the thing, I meet someone and a friendship develops.... great! If not? Oh well, I don't lose sleep over it.

EDIT ~ Since someone is going to wonder, she's 24 years-old. And yes, it's literally just a friendship.
 

alpg88

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I tell it like it is with no BS or sugar-coating. Straight to the point. I do that in real life. I do that here on CPF as well. Gotten me in trouble a few times. Not just here.

Lost out on a good job about a decade ago because my potential boss asked me an honest question, I gave him an honest reply. Wasn't even anything controversial. But he didn't like my honest reply. Looking back now, I can honestly say it wasn't a huge loss. Good job, but not great. Came with an almost 2-hour commute one way! Easily the worst part of the job. Now I'm at another good job. With the commute being about 25 minutes one way. So in the end, I stayed true to myself and it didn't really cost me anything.

I'm me. If anyone doesn't like that I'm a straight shooter who tells it like it is, well; that's their problem to deal with. Not mine. I have my core group of loved ones made up of friends and family. Not looking to make friends with every new person I meet. Last one, intrestingly about 2 years ago. Neo-hippie chick who gives off very strong Baby-girl vibes and has a good heart. Sadly, gets very depressed during the Winter months. Unlikely friendship. Just sort of developed. That's the thing, I meet someone and a friendship develops.... great! If not? Oh well, I don't lose sleep over it.

EDIT ~ Since someone is going to wonder, she's 24 years-old. And yes, it's literally just a friendship.
One thing i learned working for corporations, never tell what you really feel or think, always tell them what they want to hear, or what is in trend today, cuz this is what they want to hear, when they tell you "tell me honestly" it is your que to tell them lies they want to hear, they couldn't care less what you really think as long as it stays in your head, and your head only. your potential boss may be having the same opinion as you, but he can not hear what is not "approved" by company policy. if he does he has to take actions. or he will get fired himself, if one day you tell someone what you told him , and he did not take appropriate action,.
 

bykfixer

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I never tell "the mother ship" what they want to hear. Instead I hit them with something they never expected.

The man: "you like working here?"
Me: "best job I've had so far"

The man: "you want a raise?"
Me: "nope, I want your salary"

The man: "what do you not like about working here?"
Me: "too many questions about my happiness".

Aint been fired yet.
 

Monocrom

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There is a difference between straight talking, and telling people off because of a perceived superiority. Sometimes errors or different opinions are best left reclined: A personal failure of mine.
I absolutely agree. Thankfully, I've lived long enough to know the difference. People like that young officer who get offended on behalf of a different culture or racial group are usually best ignored. Their warped mentality doesn't even allow them to realize how horribly insulting they're being.

It's like saying, "You're too stupid to realize you should be offended at the terminology this person is using in front of you. So, I'll get offended for you."

It depends on the circumstance and the individual situation. In that particular case, the young officer needed a HUGE reality check. And, he got one. There is no room for personal beliefs to that extent when an officer is in uniform. Conservative, Liberal, Gay, etc. Doesn't matter! Don't care what your personal beliefs are. When you put on that uniform, you are a neutral, profession LEO. You put your personal beliefs aside and do your job in a professional manner. You don't do what that officer did.

EDIT ~ Typo.
 
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Monocrom

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One thing i learned working for corporations, never tell what you really feel or think, always tell them what they want to hear, or what is in trend today, cuz this is what they want to hear, when they tell you "tell me honestly" it is your que to tell them lies they want to hear, they couldn't care less what you really think as long as it stays in your head, and your head only. your potential boss may be having the same opinion as you, but he can not hear what is not "approved" by company policy. if he does he has to take actions. or he will get fired himself, if one day you tell someone what you told him , and he did not take appropriate action,.
Yes, unfortunately; you're right.
I coined a term awhile back.
Human-beings are disgustingly predictable.
The more I think about it for various situations,
sadly; the more it fits. Especially the one you mentioned.
 

TPA

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At work, I've always been brutally honest. I'll be respectful, but honest. Such an attitude has its plusses and minuses, but it's a lot less work for me, and ultimately, people learn to trust me because they know I'm not going to bullmanure them. It doesn't matter whether it's the janitor, celebrities, or heads of state. I treat everyone the same*.

I've met some interesting people over the years that way, and for some of them it seemed like quite a relief that I didn't see them as ____________, and instead saw them as just another human being. I don't ask them about what they're known for, I ask them about their life outside of that, including what others would consider mundane. The mundane is what makes us human, and you learn a lot about what makes that person tick by it.

*Child abusers and similar are the exception. I have my reasons.
 

TPA

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Flowery language only delays the inevitable and can set the person up for failure. Best to address reality early in the game.

Two cases:

Case #1: One of my classmates from pre-med. MK was a nice guy. Friendly, great personality, very likable and agreeable. He even ticked some of those non-academic checkboxes that academia loves these days. There was one major problem: He didn't have it academically. Not dumb, but just not cut out for the curriculum. But because he ticked the boxes, everyone kept pushing him to go further and would look the other way when he wasn't doing well in his classes and test scores were abysmal. So, he managed to get into a good mid-tier med school. Being mid-tier, the school has the mindset of trying to help every student graduate if at all possible. The top-tier schools are brutal, btw. $350k later, he was now an MD, doing his residency in a large major city hospital earning absolute peanuts on a medical resident's salary. Let's just say the truth finally caught up with him. I don't know the details, but he was no longer practicing medicine AND still had the $350k of student loan debt he'd have to find some way to pay off, along with looking for a new career.

Case #2: A student went to a small private college in their hometown in the Northeast to study engineering. He wasn't doing well in his first semester and almost flunked out entirely on the second semester. One of his professors went through his exam, trying to figure out why the student wasn't performing well. The math was correct, but the student wasn't understanding the application. The professor pulls the student aside and has an honest talk with him. "Son, you're not cut out to be an engineer. You're not getting it. BUT, you do math really well. I want to introduce you to a professor over at the business school. You would do well with accounting." Not what the student wanted to hear, but ultimately was the best thing that could have happened to him. The student did change majors over to accounting and did extremely well. Even in the industry, he's recognized as one of the top people in his field.

Case #2 is my own father, btw. Ironically, engineering is my forte, and he's still sore about that.
 

pnwoutdoors

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Please note I don't do this it isn't my style they have a hard job so I treat them with kindness and respect .but I always wondered if was legal to cuss them out? Becuzse I'm met a few cops who didn't deserve respect . But I just said yes sir and no sir wished them well but was thinking to self what a jerk

Can't imagine choice of words, by itself, would be in the state statutes as unlawful. But I can see "disorderly" or even "resisting" being a really big tent, so to speak, under which an offensive cop could easily level a charge if he/she despised what was said.

Once had an off-duty copy aggressively tailgate me. And he had the temerity to claim I was the offending party (aka, the instigating aggressor) when I used my vehicles lights to warn him of the extreme danger he was placing us in. He forcibly blocked the road and attempted to rip me a new one (for his crime). Very thoughtful of him. I had a whole host of words for the idiot on the tip of my tongue, though it was clear he was the sort who'd just looooove stuffing a charge or two via the disorderly/resisting opportunity.

Takes all kinds, this life does. Even one or two of that sort. Bless their hearts.
 

Monocrom

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Still, a little tactfulness is almost always called for.
I remember many long years ago (decades?) I was on line (literally waiting to pay for something with other customers both in front, and behind me). A not-very-attractive woman in her 40s was speaking with a younger woman. The part of their conversation I couldn't help overhearing (since the older woman was rather loud) was regarding how the older woman treated others.

She said that in Life, you have to be overly polite and nice to those who sign your paychecks.... because they literally pay you. And, be sure to get nose-deep when you kiss haas. You have to be overly polite to anyone with the power to screw over your entire Life. Basically, police officers. You get pulled over, doesn't matter if the reason is legit or not. Doesn't matter if the officer is a perv who lingers too long looking at your chest or says disgusting comments to you. Stay polite, smile, get through it until you drive home.... Everyone else in Life? You don't have to be polite to any of them! You don't like someone? Screw them! No reason to be nice to them. If being nice to someone you don't like doesn't actually benefit you, then don't bother!

Some things in Life just stick with me. That random convo. I overhead more years than I can remember was definitely one of them. Thing is, she was right.
 

Toulouse42

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Speaking from a British point of view, a gentleman is someone who would never embarrass others or make them feel small. I have met too many people who think they are gentlemen but who fail this test. My wife often says "Lady Diana wouldn't do that" when seeing the behaviour of some others.

We have a British politician who a few years ago spoke disparagingly about what we call "White Van Man". These are the very people who, like shop assistants, kept this country going during covid. Needless to say the comment backfired.

It brings to mind the joke about the difference between General Knowledge and Trivia. What I know that you don't know is general knowledge. What you know that I don't is called trivia.

I know about accountancy and finance. Almost everyone that I meet knows a lot of stuff that I don't know. I try to treat everyone with respect until they demonstrate that they don't deserve it.
 
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It brings to mind the joke about the difference between General Knowledge and Trivia. What I know that you don't know is general knowledge. What you know that I don't is called trivia.
Speaking of Jersey, it sits in the Bay of St Malo, 14 miles from the French coast and 85 miles south of the English coast. Jersey is the biggest of the Channel Islands.
Jersey is 5 miles long and 9 miles wide.

Jersey has 12 parishes.

English is the main language spoken in Jersey. Other languages include Portuguese, Polish, and, Jèrriais.

Jersey's southerly location and sheltered position in the Bay of St Malo mean that they have a generally temperate climate that is often warmer, with more sunshine hours, than you might experience in the other British Isles.

Jersey is not tax-free. The public revenues of the Island are raised by income tax.

Jersey is self-governing and has its own financial and legal systems and courts of law.

Jersey is a British Crown Dependency is defended and internationally represented by the UK government.

The Island also has its own postal and telecommunications services.

Jersey, Guernsey, and the Isle of Man are part of the British Isles. England, Scotland, and Wales comprise Great Britain, while the United Kingdom includes Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Jersey is a British Crown Dependency.

Jersey has a Royal Court, which is equal to the UK's Crown Court for criminal matters, and the UK's High Court for civil matters. It also runs an administrative jurisdiction similar to that in the Divisional Court and receives statutory appeals from executive committees of the States. It exercises a supervisory and an appellate jurisdiction over the Island's lower criminal and civil courts.

- Cliff Clavin
 

raggie33

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we have a wonderul sheriff dept here but man o man one is like 500 pounds and he is about as fun a dentist visit
 

Monocrom

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Being tactful when people don't deserve that kindness is not about other people.

Being tactful is exhibiting self-control. It's conducting oneself as a gentleman.
Being a Gentleman is something the world no longer understands, nor respects. Tolerating other peoples' BS isn't worth it.... unless they sign your paycheck or could ruin your life.
 
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