Interesting lumen specs from Pelican

dano

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Well, shoot, I bought a Pelican M11, and think it's a bad-arse light, but I'll write up something about it shortly...Anyways, I also received a Pelican catalog, which lists lumen values for a few popular lights::

Stinger: 108 lumens, 15000CP
SL-20X: 194 lumens, 30K CP
SL-20XP: 155 lumens, 25K CP
Magcharger: 159 lumens, CP unknown

Pelican quotes the M11 as: 163 lumens, 40K CP
and the M9 as 119 lumens, 20K CP.

What's interesting is that my M11 has a very tight beam until about 50 feet, when it spreads out considerably. The beam quality is on par with a surefire (nice round, w/out shadows or rings), and seems brighter then my 20X, probably due to beam quality. It is 4.8V, compared to the 6V Streamlight systems...

--dan
 
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**DONOTDELETE**

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I find some these lumen ratings questionable. My MagCharger(30K CP)is as bright if not brighter than the SL-20X. And my SureFire 6R with P60 bulb (65 lumens) is brighter than a Stinger and the SureFire 9P with P90 bulb (105 lumens) is nearly twice as bright as a Stinger.
 

Flashlightboy

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This is something that has always struck me as being odd and I can't' think of a reason (a legitimate one) why someone hasn't done a side by side comparison of candlepower and lumens.
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Yes, I understand why you can't have a conversion chart but there is nothing to keep a manufacturer from testing and listing both specs.
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Listing both makes for a better informed buyer and if a manufacturer finds high lumens but low candlepower for a product or some other combination, then the marketing people can do their job and explain why their product is better suited for a particular application.

It really wouldn't be that hard to do if you think about it. All manfacturers, including flashlights, have slick catalogs on heavyweight glossy paper with every manner of nouns, verbs and other assorted consonants and vowels explaining why their product is superior. No reason why it can't be done for flashlights as well. Kudos to Pelican!
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**DONOTDELETE**

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An isotropic (radiating in all directions equally) light of one candela will produce an illuminance of one lumen per square foot, which is exactly the same as one foot candle per square foot.

The problem with real life comparisons is that beams from reflector equipped or LED devices is far from isotropic, and the fact that a lumen depends on the wavelength of the light being evaluated. 555 nm. is perceived as the brightest to the non dark adapted eye.

"Full spectrum" devices rarely have a uniform level of light throughout the visible spectrum. This is why some lights are referred to in degrees Kelvin, which correspond to the radiation from a body of a given temperature.

Hope this helps. Go here for further information: http://www.intl-light.com/handbook/ch07.html

Walt
 

Flashlightboy

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Walt,

I find your posts very helpful but this time you've lost me and I think I'm lost because I don't have a science background.

To my feeble mind, I see Pelican using whatever devices they want/have to measure candlepower in their lights and I don't know why they couldn't measure a SF light the same way. Likewise with SF.

While I understand that there are many variables wouldn't some sort of base measure or comparison table be possible?
confused.gif


It seems that this shouldn't be so hard.
 

artar

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SomeWhere on the internet i found these Values:

PeliLights M7
10.000 CandlePower / 15 Lumen

PeliLights M9
20.000 CandlePower / 120 Lumen

PeliLights MityLite
4000 CandlePower / 4 Lumen

PeliLights VERSABRITE II
8000 CandlePower / 7 Lumen

PeliLights MAGNUM PLUS
8000 CandlePower / 9 Lumen

PeliLights M10-S
30.000 CandlePower / 70 Lumen

web page
 
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**DONOTDELETE**

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Jeff; the simple answer to your question is that is not in the best interests of the companies involved to post accurate and decipherable comparisons. Got it? Walt
 

Flashlightboy

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Yes I get it and that's what I've always thought. I don't like it and I wish, even for a single manufacturer, to make a side by side comparison.

Someone needs to freak out the establishment.
shocked.gif
 

dano

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To clear some stuff up: According to the Pelican catalog, the lumen ratings were conducted by them, using a Labsphere Integrating Sphere Test System Model sc-5500. The candlepower ratings were taken from the other companies' literature...

--dan
 

JB

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Thanks for the numbers dano.

All I can say is that Pelican's numbers are all over the place. Very little correlation between their lumens and CP (at least from the numbers ghost posted). E.g. M10-S is 30k CP and 70 lumens, the M9 is 20k CP and 120 lumens. Huh?!?

At least Streamlights numbers have better correlation. From extrapolation the UltraStinger should be around 460-480 lumens! Say it isn't so.
 

Unicorn

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It's has to do with how tightly the beams are focused. The beam candlepower from a Surefie 6P will probably be less than the 6PT (turbohead version), since the 6PT has a tighter focus to throw the beam further. Their numbers mean to me that the higher lumen/lower CP rating of the Streamlights (SX25 & SX35) compared to the Pelicans show that the Pelicans have tighter beams than the Streamlights.
Hell the beam canddlepower ratings from the same Maglite change when you change the focus, but the lumen or total light output is the same.
 

PeLu

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Walt Welch:
An isotropic (radiating in all directions equally) light of one candela will produce an illuminance of one lumen per square foot, which is exactly the same as one foot candle per square foot.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's not completly correct: the connection in between lumen and candela have absolutely nothing to to with the unit 'foot'. An isotropic light source with one Lumen gives about 0.08 candela.
Or you say your mentioned isotropic light with one candela has some 13lm.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>
The problem with real life comparisons is ....the fact that a lumen depends on the wavelength of the light being evaluated
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is not a problem. A, let's say, red lightsource with 1lm is exactly as bright as a white or green lightsource with 1lm.

And: there is no 'degree' Kelvin, just Kelvin (for more than 25 years now).
 

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