is there any benefits to gas or keroscenne laterns?.

Wurkkos

vicv

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View attachment 17490

These have a wick AND a mantle. The flame burns BLUE if using 1K, but you can't even see it once the mantle heats up a bit. THEN, you can't even look at it. I don't know if this is what people refer to as a "hurricane" lamp, but these aren't your ordinary kerosene lamp with just a wick. They are bright and efficient.

This is an Aladdin #12. It was discontinued in the 30s, I believe, but they still make these with an upgraded burner. Fumes are very, very faint if run on 1K, your wick is in good shape, and you know how to run it. I don't know how many lumens one of these puts out, but they are considered "equivalent to a 60W bulb." May not seem like a lot until it's pitch dark and it lights almost all the downstairs rooms enough to move about, knit, read, prepare food, etc.

We have one I bought in 2001 for my wife and this one, for a big old farm house. Two is more than we need during any outage, and I bought the #12 pictured for $10 at a junk shop recently, bought a new wick, mantle (+spares) and chimney, so I have a whopping $100 in it. It was a splurge, but will be nice if I have to refill her lamp - I can turn mine on.

Might seem like a lot of money for a 100 year-old light, but I paid $250 for the modern version in 2001. They are rock-solid performers and don't deplete cells we need for portable lights. Carrying a flame about is bad business, especially with the power out. These lamps are still viable and useful after being around for 100+ years, and neither were out of fashion or made "obsolete" by the next new LED to come out. Kind of hard to give up on that.

Maybe not everyone's cup of tea, but I grew up without flashlights and still have a lot of stuff which allows me to be comfortable - not just "survive" - when there's no power during a blizzard and zero degrees outside. A font-full, about a quart, will run for 12 hours. The mantles provide nice, even white light and no "hissssssssssss."

Whenever I have to fire up the generator, I use a headlamp or fire up a Dietz lantern (we have several), which is much safer to carry and move. 1k has a lot of uses on a homestead and I always have it on hand.
Ya those Aladdin lamps are nice but can be finicky if I remember correctly. Like a combo between a hurricane lamp and a Coleman lamp
 

turbodog

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I'm still a huge fan of my Coleman white gas lantern for base camps. I believe white gas carries far more lumens per pound than any battery, but I haven't verified the math. It runs great on gasoline, so if we lose the grid, we still have years of light...as long as we don't shatter the globes. :)

"Only" 800 lumens, but unlike a flashlight, that's 360 degrees of 800 lumens.

The northstar is 1150 lumens. For what it's worth.
 

turbodog

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Performance stats from the 'zon:

We'll go with the high figure since that's quoted. 800 lumens for 5 hours per 2.5 pints of fuel or 0.3125 gallons. Gasoline is about 33kWH per gallon. 10,313Wh to produce 4000 lumen-hours or about 2.58 watts per lumen.

On a mass basis ... 0.375 * 6.3 lb/gallon = 1.97 lb of gasoline. Simplistically, 4000 lumen-hours from a 100 lm/W OTF source would demand 40 watt-hours, which we could round to 4 18650 cells. A typical 18650 is around 45 grams... multiply by 4 to get 190 which is about 0.40 lb. The extra ~1.5lb could go towards additional cells or a solar charging apparatus to net considerable additional runtime.

That being said I've got a sudden hankering to retrieve dad's old Coleman lantern and see if it will fire up on gasoline.

From experience, yes, it will run on gasoline. The generator tube's not built for it and will clog though. Ask me how I know this.

Edit: I tried gasoline in a white gas unit MANY years ago... leading to a clogged generator. Modern pump gas.. which is clear as water might do just fine.

Most of the old colemans... the seals dry out after a few years of sitting. Filling and pressurizing... be careful.
 
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turbodog

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Coleman (and I imagine others) used to make such a beast. At the time when it was manufactured:
  • Upsides: Kerosene is cheaper and less volatile than white gas
  • Downsides: Fiddly operation, requires secondary priming fuel to preheat gas generator
As has been stated elsewhere, kerosene is probably best used in a hurricane-style lamp for simplicity's sake.

I own a dual-fuel coleman along with a almost-NIB coleman kero unit(used twice).

You can run citronella oil in the kero model, or most any kero-similar fuel. Even running 'smell free' kero... it will make your eyes water.

The preheat's not too bad. Yes, you need some preheat fuel. I use denatured alcohol.

One of the duel fuel units I used to own (wore it out)... I added an aftermarket flint wheel striker. You could light it without matches/etc. Then it retracted downward to keep from getting roasted by the flame. Was one of those $5 purchases that will be worth $100K in 100 years to some antique hunter.
 

Jeff H

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Ya those Aladdin lamps are nice but can be finicky if I remember correctly. Like a combo between a hurricane lamp and a Coleman lamp
I've found that the single biggest cause of finickiness (hey, it MUST be a real word - spell check didn't flag me) in these is caused by using "lamp oil" of various types, which are not specifically just plain old, straight (and fairly fresh) 1k kerosene. The "lamp oils" gun up the wick and the workings. Once I got that through my head, everything was fine. Lamp oils with paraffin oil in them will gel or congeal in freezing temps too. Some "lamp oils" of unknown constitution have caused verdigree (green gunk) on brass parts too.

They are not cheap, and the replacement mantles went from $6 in 2001 to $24 now. A chimney is $25 and wicks are about $12, but all those things will last a long time if using them intermittently. Otherwise, used constantly, you could go through a couple mantles in a year.

For me, familiarity with them, logistical reasons, nostalgia probably play a part. I still get a nostalgic twinge when I see (or otherwise sense) a wooden outhouse too though.

EDIT: Otherwise, I think some form of LED lantern would be the berries if one is well stocked on cells and has a means to charge them. I don't leave the generator run long enough to so that. I fire it up long enough to run the furnace fan, sump pump and fridge every hour or two as needed. The wood stove won't heat the whole house but but is cozy in that room and keeps the rest pretty bearable.
 

raggie33

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the panel is

Upgraded]BigBlue 3 USB Ports 28W Solar Charger(5V/4.8A Max), Foldable Portable Solar Phone Charger with SunPower Solar Panel Compatible with iPhone 11/Xs/XS Max/XR/X/8/7, iPad, Samsung Galaxy LG etc.

 

turbodog

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I've found that the single biggest cause of finickiness (hey, it MUST be a real word - spell check didn't flag me) in these is caused by using "lamp oil" of various types, which are not specifically just plain old, straight (and fairly fresh) 1k kerosene. ...

At first glance, this seems obvious. But I have to wonder... those lamps were made a long time ago... when kero was not nearly as 1) clean and 2) consistent as today. Of course the mantles/wicks have probably changed also. Older mantles were probably dripping with radioactive doping.
 

vicv

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I'm talking more the tiniest breeze will blow the flame all over the place. Even a small fan or breeze from an open window.
 

turbodog

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To answer the OP's question....

Emergency battery lanterns tend to have dead batteries when you need them. Or the batteries die and replacements are not available (storms/emergencies/hurricanes/etc).

Gas/kero lanterns suffer from similar problems (broken mantles, stale fuel, clogged generators, etc). In addition, your vehicle/generator is competing with your lantern for precious gasoline. Can't run these indoors either.

Kero lantern seems MUCH more sensitive to pressure than the white gas/gasoline versions.

Given the overall trends toward led lanterns, the lack of lantern service parts, the scarcity of mantles, and the can't-run-indoors problem.... I would go led and keep the fuel lanterns as a decoration.
 

vicv

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One thing I will say is there doesn't seem to be an actual replacement though for the fuel lanterns. The only battery operated lantern I've scene that can compete with the brightness is the streamlight super surge or whatever it's called. And even that doesn't stay at a thousand lumens for long. Whereas a gas lantern will keep that output up indefinitely as long as you keep it full of fuel. And it has a non-replaceable battery so you can't switch out batteries during an outage. Once it's dead that's it. It's also quite expensive. So I really don't know the answer to this if you really need emergency lighting which as I said before I don't think it's all that necessary. We all have flashlights and many batteries if you light temporarily
 

Olumin

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I mean look, if we can have, like, a thousand lumens for over an hour continuously from one 21700, why is no one making a 9x 21700 lantern with, like, 800-1000 Lumens for 10 hours? batteries go upright in the base (I mean its a lantern, you have all the space you need), the whole battery pack would be fitted with a bayonet system underneath the lantern, so you could switch it out for another one in a matter of seconds for another 10 hours runtime. Access to the batteries by unscrewing the bottom plate of pack like tailcap from flashlight. Removable diffuser, choice between acrylic or scratch resistant coated glas screen, choice to charge via integrated USB-C/magnetic or batts individually. Color temp from 2700k to 5000k or so all HCRI. What am I missing?
 

vicv

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This is exactly what I mean. Like I do a lot of laptop and drill battery salvage. I have so many 18650s of various brands capacities and chemistries that I could use. They're not that great for powering flashlights by themselves but if there's eight of them in parallel it doesn't matter. And that would be a sweet lantern
 

Hooked on Fenix

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I mean look, if we can have, like, a thousand lumens for over an hour continuously from one 21700, why is no one making a 9x 21700 lantern with, like, 800-1000 Lumens for 10 hours? batteries go upright in the base (I mean its a lantern, you have all the space you need), the whole battery pack would be fitted with a bayonet system underneath the lantern, so you could switch it out for another one in a matter of seconds for another 10 hours runtime. Access to the batteries by unscrewing the bottom plate of pack like tailcap from flashlight. Removable diffuser, choice between acrylic or scratch resistant coated glas screen, choice to charge via integrated USB-C/magnetic or batts individually. Color temp from 2700k to 5000k or so all HCRI. What am I missing?
Try Milwaukee 18 volt 700 lumen lantern with an 8 or 12 amp battery. That will give you either 10 or 15 4 amp 21700 batteries. If 700 lumens isn’t bright enough, there is a 1500, 3000, and 4000 lumen floodlight. The 700 lumen lantern is perfectly adequate for replacing a gas lantern. The l.e.d.s rotate from a lantern to floodlight configuration if you need more light in one direction.
 

Poppy

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My general thought is that lanterns above 100 lumens certainly, those above 300 lumens give off too much glare.
The energizer flip up diffuser, (they call it "Light Fusion Technology") above, handles glare better than the others. That satellite one only puts out about 30 lumens, so glare isn't an issue.

That Ryobi takes 18V One+ tool batteries. It's rated at 130 lumens.

If I wanted to light a large area, I'd prefer to put multiple lanterns around each at about 100 lumens. The two 3 D Cell lanterns above will do 100 lumens for about the same amount of time as a 3 - 18650 lantern will.

Here is my review of the Ryobi lantern.
 

Olumin

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"...that famous Texas part of Hamburg"
Try Milwaukee 18 volt 700 lumen lantern with an 8 or 12 amp battery. That will give you either 10 or 15 4 amp 21700 batteries. If 700 lumens isn’t bright enough, there is a 1500, 3000, and 4000 lumen floodlight. The 700 lumen lantern is perfectly adequate for replacing a gas lantern. The l.e.d.s rotate from a lantern to floodlight configuration if you need more light in one direction.
Thats the idea, I doubt thats gonna appeal much to flashaholics tho. Im not personally looking for any lantern. The the advantage of my idea would be that you can use any regular 18650 or 21700 cells. A 12-cell battery holder that can run the lantern even with only 1x battery. Lets say they ship it with 4x 21700 5000mAh to keep cost down for 5+ hour runtime on High. Customer can provide the rest. Up to like 15+ Hour flat regulated HCRI 800 lumen runtime on a full pack of 21700s. With maybe a rotary knob for adjusting brightness instead of a button/switch for intuitiveness. Have like 10+ brightness levels (like SF Minimus) or infinitely adjustable. Nice stout milled alu. construction instead of cheap plastic and option for glas to avoid scratches. I can image Fenix or Lumintop making such a thing. anyone except Olight.
 
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