is there any tricks to useing wet stones?

old4570

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Feb 15, 2009
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Outdoors55 on youtube ! .......

Tricks ? I dont know about tricks ..
But I would say , give yourself time to develop the skill / technique that works ..
To that end buy a CHEAP knife and have at it .
If you ruin a $5 supermarket knife , consider it a cheap education !
I would not start with a $500 knife or even a $50 knife .
When you can produce a good clean edge that is not overly convexed , then you might be there .
I still make great convexes ..... ( Not what I am after ) Yeah , it's sharp butt ! Convexed edges dont have the edge retention I want .

Also outdoors55 goes on about hair whittling sharp ! The only problem I have with that ........ It makes for a fragile edge that is easily rolled / damaged / chipped etc ! Great for bragging rights ( right ? )
Anyways , U do what works for U ! If it don't work , check out outdoors55 on Utube . ( He tries to make sense )
 

Raymond33

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concord, ca
Simple question. Long answer needed. I am an accomplished free hand knife sharpener. Everyone who watches me says that I make it look very easy, but that has taken over 60 years experience. Here are some suggestions:
1. Learn how to gage the sharpness of a knife. Really, precisely. Use one or more consistent testing mythologies and consistent testing material so that you can judge very exactly how sharp a knife is. This is essential so that you can accurately judge whether or not you are making progress during the sharpening process. (If you really want to push yourself, learn what the differences between Hanging Hair Test level 0 to 5 are and strive for those results, with your hand sharpened knife.)
2. Learn what a burr is, how to raise a burr, and then how to remove the burr leaving a very clean apex.
3. Learn to be consistent at maintaining an angle.
4. Keep a written record of the sharpening that you do, with each knife. That way, you will know in the future the angle, grit, purpose etc of the prior sharpening.
5. Push yourself with comparison to other sharpeners. After I joined an internet blade forum decades ago, my sharpening skills and results zoomed ahead (again after years of effort).
6. Care for your stones. I have well over a hundred, many of which are natural stones that were used for decades that I bought used. They needed to be boiled, flattened and loved, but are now real useful treasures. You don't need a lot of stones. Most of the time, I use one stone of 600 grit and a strop, and I assure you that the results can be not just shaving sharp, but actually hair popping sharp. You might consider forcing yourself to avoid all motor driven devices at all costs. (Most people don't know that the temper of the apex can be lost by the heat from motor driven wheels and strops.) Once you learn to freehand sharpen, you won't want to go back.
7. Become independent. Go ahead and sharpen all your knives yourself, even the very expensive ones. Have fun.

This is a picture of one of my wife's thin head hairs that has been split into 4 sections, with a hand sharpened kitchen knife with very high quality steel (HAP40) at a RC of 64.
Hair Art.jpg
 
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desert.snake

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This device also helps to maintain an angle; it can be made inexpensively from improvised materials. I learned about this tool last week from a very good sharpening specialist when I asked him for help sharpening an M390. With the M390 the issue was resolved; it turned out that there was a defective layer on the edge of the blade. After removing ~0.5-0.7 mm of metal, the steel became good and easy to sharpen
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desert.snake

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There is another trick - the technological barrier. To remove creeping microdefects on the cutting edge. It also helps to get rid of a burrs. Here at about 30:25 minutes and onwards. The point is that if there are defects, they can be removed when switching to a finer abrasive using side grinding. A very complex topic, I just started studying



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As far as I found out, this trick was spread or was invented of a very cool master-sharpener from this video
 
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