Kids react to old computers

Monocrom

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This video generated enough interest and discussion when posted in our "Interesting Video" thread, that it appeared worthy of its own thread. Thus, the moving it to its own thread. - Empath

"Kids react to old computers."

[video=youtube;PF7EpEnglgk]http://www.youtube,com/watch?v=PF7EpEnglgk[/video]
 
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degarb

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"Kids react to old computers."

[video=youtube;PF7EpEnglgk]http://www.youtube,com/watch?v=PF7EpEnglgk[/video]


My kids just watched this video and liked it. I think the odd response would extend to even people in their 20's.

Sadly, as choice expands, there is too much temptation. I see very few people, not wasting their time in the channel and website ghettos. Got to go check my facebook, after I get my CPF fix. Email, checked hourly. Looking forward to more reality TV tonight.

Early 80's computers taught logic, since you had to write your own basic programs. By mid 80's, I never liked my 80's luggable 8080 with floppy drive. Too much data loss and too slow. College papers, that you worked on for several days, had a way of just disappearing off these disk drives. By the early 90's (I lagged available tech, unlike my Brother who could afford an early windows os machine by 88 or 89.) I did like my 286 with 20 meg internal HD. I had two, and my idea of multitasking was running both at once. I could "gopher" or Genie, and work on a doc at the same time. No Alibaba, life was just better back then. I do still use my HP200 lx several times a week, since no phone/android tablet can do a spreadsheet like the HP95/100/200 lx (or have unending field battery life, or have external keypad for palmtop, or very readable screen outside). I wouldn't sell it for 2 grand.
 
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Monocrom

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My kids just watched this video and liked it. I think the odd response would extend to even people in their 20's.

Sadly, as choice expands, there is too much temptation. I see very few people, not wasting their time in the channel and website ghettos. Got to go check my facebook, after I get my CPF fix. Email, checked hourly. Looking forward to more reality TV tonight.

Early 80's computers taught logic, since you had to write your own basic programs. By mid 80's, I never liked my 80's luggable 8080 with floppy drive. Too much data loss and too slow. College papers, that you worked on for several days, had a way of just disappearing off these disk drives.

Yup. I've said it before. Gonna say it again.... Floppy disks were ridiculously fragile and never should have been brought to market in the first place since they weren't even remotely ready to be sold to consumers. But why let one little detail like that get in the way of making money. And yes, I know what you mean about lost data. For some incredibly stupid reason, our computer teacher back then thought that it would be perfectly fine for each student to take their floppy disk home and bring it back the next day. "Just put it in your backpack."

:rolleyes:
 
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Steve K

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"Kids react to old computers."

[video=youtube;PF7EpEnglgk]http://www.youtube,com/watch?v=PF7EpEnglgk[/video]

old computer? I didn't notice any punch cards or punch tape... how could it be old?
Heck, it didn't even use a cassette tape for data storage or display the contents of registers in Binary Coded Decimal on a row of LEDs.
Kids nowadays really don't know how nice it was to transition to something fancy like an IBM XT!
 
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PhotonWrangler

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Old computers? We had a Kaypro 10 at the office. It ran CPM and it was used as a file server, connected via serial to a client device. It was a reliable machine, but one of the weirdest things about that O/S was that the drive letters would change depending on which drive you booted from. If all of your files were stored on A, and you booted from B, then B became A and your files disappeared! That is until you realized what was going on and found them on B.

And I agree Monocrom, floppy disks were really fragile. Over time the lubrication sheets inside the disk envelope would wear out and they'd make some nasty scuffing sounds when spinning, usually a sign that the disk wasn't long for this world.

A bit of trivia - when the 3-1/2" discs came out, they were called "stiffy disks" for a very short while, as they were less floppy than their 5-1/4" counterparts, at least on the outside. They had most of the same failure modes of regular floppies though. One clue to a failing disc was when you slide the metal cover back and see a circular scratch on the disc media.
 
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Monocrom

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old computer? I didn't notice any punch cards or punch tape... how could it be old?
Heck, it didn't even use a cassette tape for data storage or display the contents of registers in Binary Coded Decimal on a row of LEDs.
Kids nowadays really don't know how nice it was to transition to something fancy like an IBM XT!

Honestly, I wish they still used cassette tapes for computers back when I went to school. I never lost anything that was stored on a cassette tape.
 

Steve K

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Honestly, I wish they still used cassette tapes for computers back when I went to school. I never lost anything that was stored on a cassette tape.

the access time for tape was a bit slow... but I'll still rate it above punch cards as a way to store a program. No one ever dropped a cassette and had to pick up the magnetic domains and put them back in the right order. :)
 

Illum

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the access time for tape was a bit slow... but I'll still rate it above punch cards as a way to store a program. No one ever dropped a cassette and had to pick up the magnetic domains and put them back in the right order. :)

tape drive still has their place though.... hated punch cards, encryption or loss of data is done by removing or losing ONE card
 

Monocrom

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the access time for tape was a bit slow... but I'll still rate it above punch cards as a way to store a program. No one ever dropped a cassette and had to pick up the magnetic domains and put them back in the right order. :)

For me, it's more of a comparison of cassette vs. floppy disk. Or Slow vs. Ridiculously fragile.

When those are the only two options for use.... I'll take slow every day of the week.

I forgot to mention in my earlier post that the classroom being used as a computer room (no dedicated, specialized, computer rooms back when I attended Junior High) had tons of storage space in the form of locked cabinets that went all around the room; on the bottom of the floor. The computer teacher happily let her homeroom class keep their floppy disks in the locked drawers. Took up less than half of one of the cabinets. The rest of the classes she taught? Yeah, we had to carry ours' in our packs. No matter how careful I was, a tiny crease always occurred. And when it did, she treated me like crap because of it. As if she somehow forgot how ridiculously fragile they are.... or that she had plenty of storage space to keep them locked up in the cabinets in her classroom.

I wasn't the only one who had no respect for her. As a result, I hated computers. Still do to this day. I have zero vital information stored on mine. Other than the internet and occasional game of Solitaire, I could easily live without one.
 

StarHalo

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... or that she had plenty of storage space to keep them locked up in the cabinets in her classroom.

Some electronics class know-how with ~20 seconds near those cabinets and everyone gets a lesson on the frailty of magnetic media..

sPItPV5.jpg
 
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