Kitchen use- Paring Knife vs. Pocket Knife

jzmtl

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Eh, $75 for a pairing knife, if you got money to throw around sure, but if on a budget I'd pass. I don't use my pocket knives because they'll be a pain to clean and re lube after every use. I use a $13 mora scout and it works great.
 

karlthev

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A bird knife might be used---non-folder so it would be easy to clean. I am an avid cook (all the meals in my home for the past 25 years), have an extensive collection of custom knives--folders and "straight" knives but use a regular kitchen paring knife for smaller tasks in the kitchen. The one I have is very cheap by comparison to my custom collector ($25?) "bird" knives and I don't have to worry about dropping it and ruining some exotic handle material or breaking the blade itself on the tile floor. Certainly you could use a more expensive knife but, if the cheaper one works as well (and in most cases sharpens so much easier!) why do so? T oeach his/her own though....


Karl
 

FredM

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Eh, $75 for a pairing knife, if you got money to throw around sure, but if on a budget I'd pass. I don't use my pocket knives because they'll be a pain to clean and re lube after every use. I use a $13 mora scout and it works great.

Its about $35 at my local store.
 

Lee1959

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I have a lot of knives, including a nice A.G. Russell kitchen knife set. The two knives my wife and I use in the kitchen most are a smallish Rapala fishing knife and a small knife I made for myself to use as a patch knife years ago. I put a small swedish patch knife blade in an oak handle and my wife swiped it to use as her paring knife after using it in hunting camp. She uses these two over the ceramic blades I bought her even.

I once made a mistake and tried to cut off a piece of a chocolate rabbit from Easter and torqued the blade of the small paring/patch knife and it snapped. Boy she was hot till I made another just lke it. Now
I cannot even use it.

Point being, look around before buying an expensive blade, there are some cheaper priced alternatives that work just as well that you wont cry if you accidently mess up in a thoughtless moment.
 

bullfrog

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I hope so. I just bought a Shun elite Chef's knife.

I didn't even see that you already went Shun!

Congratulations and use it in good health - YOU WILL LOVE IT! Hard foods honestly "melt" when the blade touches - its unbelievable.

Just make sure you have a very very good place to have them sharpened or send 'em in to Shun, I'd be afraid to do it myself or have the local butcher do it...

On the pairing knife - I own a bunch of the shun "classic" series as well and they are wonderful. I would think that my pocket knife would not even be anywhere as sharp as the Shun and if it was, it would never ever hold the edge for as long as the pairing knife...
 
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nerdgineer

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Paring knives are designed for kitchen work and beat pocket knives at that game. That said, there are lots of very useful paring knives which do 95% of what that Kershaw does for much, much less money. Also, paring knives - being small - are easy to sharpen and/or have their blade profiles reground. A little stone work on a $12 paring knife (Check Tuesday Morning, Linens n Things closeouts, wherever...) will increase that 95% to 100% in no time.

Unless you're getting the Kershaw for its' looks, in which case you'll need to pay the extra $$, as is so often the case when you're buying looks...
 

FredM

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yesh im talking about folding knife. I wash them before use so there is no chance of oil.

anyways it seems likely I need to check out a paring knife or similar small knife since I only have a 8" chefs knife.
 
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RA40

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The Shun line is to our liking. I prefer using them than any of the others I've tried in the past. Usually you can find them discounted 15-20% over suggested retail. I bought our paring for about $48 and a 8" chef's for $65.

The pocket knife may make do, use the right tool for the task at hand...:)
 

adamlau

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I am as much a knifenut as I am a flashaholic. I actually have and use a Shun Elite paring knife. Thinner, flat ground profile means that it slices much better than a thicker, hollow 21.
 
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Blue72

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The deal is I can get superior metal for cheaper in a folding knife. I don;t really understand it but it is true.

whats the purpose if you would spend more time cleaning a folder with a superior steel compared to sharpening a kitchen knife with lessor steel.
 

guyg

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I dont use kitchen knives. The only exception is a Vic potato peeler. As said small fixed blades are just as good as a paring knife.I pick 'hunting 'knives for size appropriate tasks . From the Inyoni and a Bob Cumming custom to the CR Nkonka at the other end.
 

mossyoak

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i dont use kitchen knives either, i use my edc blade, a bark river mini northstar which is a laser made of sanvik, or a ontario rat-3 d2 depending on what i have with me at the moment, i use these all over the house, they are true tools, i think its funny when people use their edc blade for just opening letters and such.
 

nerdgineer

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guyg and mossyoak, you guys must not cook very much. I cook a lot and couldn't imagine how much harder it would be without a proper set of kitchen knives specialized for the task. Some (many) commercial kitchen knives are crap out of the box, but a good one with a proper blade profile (I hand grind thinner blade profiles on mine...) is a great work saver and a joy to use. I mostly use 8" and 10" chef's knives and I don't think there's anything equivalent in a hunting knife no matter how good the steel.
 

mossyoak

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guyg and mossyoak, you guys must not cook very much. I cook a lot and couldn't imagine how much harder it would be without a proper set of kitchen knives specialized for the task. Some (many) commercial kitchen knives are crap out of the box, but a good one with a proper blade profile (I hand grind thinner blade profiles on mine...) is a great work saver and a joy to use. I mostly use 8" and 10" chef's knives and I don't think there's anything equivalent in a hunting knife no matter how good the steel.

i cook alot, and thats the blade geometry for the mini northstar, just 3.5 inches.
 
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