Light and an EDC kit, what do you think of this kit?

hyperloop

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Yeah, perhaps I should have said BOB instead of EDC ah well, blame it on a lack of sleep and a not so newborn 1.5 year old son :)
 

zehnmm

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I say save your money. For less than $98 you can put together your own real EDC and/or BOB setup just by things from Walmart, Dollar Store, etc. Check out Youtube videos on an altoids kit for example.
 

more_vampires

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I say save your money. For less than $98 you can put together your own real EDC and/or BOB setup just by things from Walmart, Dollar Store, etc. Check out Youtube videos on an altoids kit for example.
Altoids can kit is a fun evening's project.

I'm a fan of the "10 cent survival knife." I edc one in my card clip next to a credit card fresnel. I had a broken hacksaw blade, so mine was free plus labor.

http://www.m4040.com/Survival/10_Cent_Survival_Knife/10_Cent_Survival_Knife.htm
 

Poppy

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Altoids can kit is a fun evening's project.

I'm a fan of the "10 cent survival knife." I edc one in my card clip next to a credit card fresnel. I had a broken hacksaw blade, so mine was free plus labor.

http://www.m4040.com/Survival/10_Cent_Survival_Knife/10_Cent_Survival_Knife.htm


vamps,
that survival knife is a neat idea. Better than the razor blade that most tape to the inside cover of an altoids tin.

Here is what I packed into mine.
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb...-a-mylar-bag&p=4206255&viewfull=1#post4206255

I still need to put together the second tin, (one that holds a sleeping bag :rolleyes: )
Soon I'll be working up a couple for my grandkids.

hyperloop,
I laughed when I saw it for $90! they don't even list the contents, perhaps it is just the containers?

I am sure that this is better for less.
http://www.lifegear.com/flashlights-2/flashlights/glow-flashlight
$14 at amazon
 

Str8stroke

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For that price, I could assemble a pretty darn nice kit! I look at that and think expensive storage container. I saw a friend who used a Coleman insulated drinking cup and filled it, he also used one of those clear sports water bottles that has a removable top. It seals up great is light weight.
 

more_vampires

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vamps,
I am sure that this is better for less.
http://www.lifegear.com/flashlights-2/flashlights/glow-flashlight
$14 at amazon
Been tempted to do a kit build in one of those for some time. Another trick is one of those "6v lantern battery" single-emitter floating $4 flashlights, modded with an AAx4 carrier packing Energizer Ultimate Lithium. This leaves oceans of room in the flashlight for an over-the-top kit and it looks stealth from the outside, nobody will know it's a kit. Slip your belt through the handle of the light. :)

They won't want to steal your crappy flashlight. :)

that survival knife is a neat idea. Better than the razor blade that most tape to the inside cover of an altoids tin.
I like it so much, I don't keep it in the tin as I seal the tin with electrical tape for waterproofing. I keep it in my back pocket between credit and debit card (for finding civilization) in the envelope with a fresnel lens. My altoids can is a "backup kit" for shirt pocket carry, no intention to be in and out of it all day.

Button compass, matchbox crank light, mini-bic (and I know the improvised spark light trick,) dryer lint, aluminum foil, nylon cord, sewing needle and thread, fish hooks, couple birthday cake candles.

I also sport a "survival necklace" based off of the Esee survival necklace (with snare stuff.)

My pack is a Thor hydration day pack. If I need low-weight high bulk extra storage space, I sport a tyvek backpack on front of the body, (hydration pack) water weight on the back. I like the tyvek Frogg Toggs as a layer in cold, also it's light rain gear (breathable.) I also like a camo poncho for day wear or making a lean-to.

..and contractor grade trashbags. Make a makeshift sink, gear raft, sink meat in a cold stream (Wilderness Refrigerator.)
 
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DaftEarth20883

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That light looks good for a BOB but personally it's too big for EDC for me anyway. I'll just stick to my Mini-Mag AA it hasn't failed me yet it's taken a beating. I would consider carrying it as a night EDC, if I went on a walk or something but I'd probably prefer my Nikota 4D flashlight, it's really heavy and can pack a wallop.
 

markr6

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Cool idea. The problem with most pre-packaged deals like this is that the quality of everything sucks. I can't speak for sure on this one but you usually get cheap wire, cheap tape, cheap bandaids that don't stick, cheap batteries, and whatever else they may contain.

I personally don't get into these kits much or make my own because:

1. I have no self control - I end up with a 10lb bag with everything but the kitchen sink in it.
2. I can't stand tying up nice gear which will probably never be used. Feels like a waste. I guess I can use cheaper stuff, but then I feel cheated...I want the good stuff!
 

more_vampires

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1. I have no self control - I end up with a 10lb bag with everything but the kitchen sink in it.
2. I can't stand tying up nice gear which will probably never be used. Feels like a waste. I guess I can use cheaper stuff, but then I feel cheated...I want the good stuff!
10lbs is pretty light for a field kit! :)

One thing I do to mitigate "that feeling" having gear "tied up in a kit" is a hobby I picked up while shoveling for Sam. It's called "kit bashing."

On a large counter top (or bed spread,) spread out all of the gear from all of your kits. Having a scale handy can help a lot. The goal of kit bashing is to come up with a kit that meets the needs with the lightest weight possible. My goal is something I can EDC. If you can EDC your kit, then it's good to go for lightweight camping and trekking. This way, the gear is not "tied up in a never-used kit," but something you get in the habit of EDC'ing and keeping in your head that's it's there and where and when you can use it. Nothing worse than FORGETTING YOU HAVE SOMETHING, particularly if you needed it. Facepalm when you realize you had it? Forgot it was there? :(

Water is usually the #1 offender for heavy heavy kits.
 

markr6

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10lbs is pretty light for a field kit! :)

One thing I do to mitigate "that feeling" having gear "tied up in a kit" is a hobby I picked up while shoveling for Sam. It's called "kit bashing."

On a large counter top (or bed spread,) spread out all of the gear from all of your kits. Having a scale handy can help a lot. The goal of kit bashing is to come up with a kit that meets the needs with the lightest weight possible. My goal is something I can EDC. If you can EDC your kit, then it's good to go for lightweight camping and trekking. This way, the gear is not "tied up in a never-used kit," but something you get in the habit of EDC'ing and keeping in your head that's it's there and where and when you can use it. Nothing worse than FORGETTING YOU HAVE SOMETHING, particularly if you needed it. Facepalm when you realize you had it? Forgot it was there? :(

Water is usually the #1 offender for heavy heavy kits.

I was referring to 10lb for a small 5x7x2 pouch!! Got out of control, but I keep it in my Jeep anyway. I've only needed to use maybe 3 items out of about 30 in there so it's not a total waste. I could definitely do some reorganizing though.
 

more_vampires

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I was referring to 10lb for a small 5x7x2 pouch!! Got out of control, but I keep it in my Jeep anyway. I've only needed to use maybe 3 items out of about 30 in there so it's not a total waste. I could definitely do some reorganizing though.
Eek! Are you EDCing lead? :)

My field pack is just under 20lbs without water. It is so heavy because it contains a heavy chopping blade, .22 magnum or .22lr Ar-7, and .40 pistol plus ammo. Those are the heaviest items in the kit (not counting water.) I figure it's good for 72 hours without foraging for food, no choice but to forage for water. Longer treks get a sharpened military pick additional, mine is Swiss surplus. It weighs about eleven billion pounds. :)

Rimfire shotshells are better than you might think for small game. I also occasionally pack a slingshot and have arrows. At my best, I could hit at 30ish yards. I'm out of practice. Anyway, "judo point" or "SGH" heads are excellent loss-prevention arrowheads. They make the arrow flip straight up when hitting the ground, rather than shooting under the leaves. They are also tons of fun on pine cones. Carbon fiber arrows are nearly weightless. :)

Note on slingshot bows: You want "Theraband Black" for the tubes. Stock yellows are JUNK. Theraband black crushes small game with a marble or a 12mm hex nut.
 
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Str8stroke

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I am in the process of building a Bottle Kit. One thing that hasn't been mentioned is a flexible solar panel. My plan is to include this in my kit and a single USB style AA/AAA charger. I am still studying the best route to go, but that is my current idea (no pun intended). :D
 
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