Light with intuitive switches?

vicv

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 22, 2013
Messages
1,220
Location
Southern Ontario
I would second the mag xl200
Maybe a mag-tac
There was also one I saw in the custom flashlights forum that looked really cool and used that quantum material where the more you tightened it the brighter it got. That looked really neat. I would consider buying a light from them if they weren't all designed for flood. I like lights with a tighter hot spot like Maglite and surefire produce
 

htraps

New member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
3
Thanks guys I forgot about this thread, it didn't show up initially because it had to be approved I guess.

Of those mentioned, I think the HDS Rotary is the nicest pick although I'd prefer an 18650 battery, is there any advantages besides size to the CR123a in the HDS Rotary? I'd pick the rotary for its dim "firefly" mode, I have an Armytek predator with 0.2lm, love the output absolutely hate the switches. I'm using the Armytek Pred in low and firefly mode here with "warm" colour LED,



I would have picked the Stinger 2020 but its light outputs doesn't look any good to me, its 2000lm - 850lm - 100lm. My ideal light would be a "warm" 2000lm - 300lm - 0.3lm as I hate the cold white light and have no use for output modes so close together. There's no huge practical difference between 2000lm and 850lm, and 100lm is not dim, not bright just ... meh.
 

GadgetGeek

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
88
Location
New Jersey
IMO, the old 2-stage Surefire tailcap switches found on lights like the A2 (press for low / press harder for high) are still among the finest user interfaces developed for a flashlight used for work. Unfortunately, the choice of modern lights with those switches is pretty small.
I have to agree. Aka 'gas pedal' switch. That's why I hold onto my old Surefire LX2 and EDCL2-T.

Second favorite is the Zebralight interface.
 

lightfooted

Well-known member
Joined
May 6, 2010
Messages
967
"There's no huge practical difference between 2000lm and 850lm, and 100lm is not dim, not bright just ... meh."
Runtime? I mean surely the 850 lumen mode will last longer and still be bright. I would also argue that the two brightness settings are noticeably different. Especially out in the dark, where 2000 lumens will reach farther than the 850 lumens.

I do agree that 100 lumens is neither dim, nor bright. Definitely not what I want as my lowest available setting.
 

htraps

New member
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
3
"There's no huge practical difference between 2000lm and 850lm, and 100lm is not dim, not bright just ... meh."
Runtime? I mean surely the 850 lumen mode will last longer and still be bright. I would also argue that the two brightness settings are noticeably different. Especially out in the dark, where 2000 lumens will reach farther than the 850 lumens.

I do agree that 100 lumens is neither dim, nor bright. Definitely not what I want as my lowest available setting.

I make no argument that there is not a perceivable difference between 850 and 2000, just that the 850 isn't needed in the practical sense. The vast majority of any practical use for a light is within 50m where 300lm is just fine and battery life is much greater then 850lm. If you need to see beyond that crank it up to 2000, extended use over 50m is really just where you are hunting/searching for something where you'd usually want it on max anyway.
 

Scotty321

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2021
Messages
175
I think one of the problems with lumen modes, is that some flashlights are designed around certain industries' preferences, and therefore might not fit into individual's personal uses. Then there's flood, floody, spotty, etc. profiles where lumen comparison will be almost irrelative. 300 lumens with a flood is not what I would consider very bright, while with a tight hotspot is more than enough to identify things at 100 yards.

Similarly, if you are working in a bright workshop, house, or even outside in the sun and need to see things in crevices or large pipes, 850 lumen vs 300 lumen is going to be appreciated. Also trying to identify something in a brightly lit area at night, such as under a bridge from 75 yards when the streetlights around you and above the bridge cause reduced night vision, the 2000 lumen vs 850 lumen is going to make a big difference. Last, if you are walking or working in a group of 10-50 people and they are all walking around with bright 300-3000 lumen lights, it gets old, really quickly.

So, it often depends on how you plan to use your light, and what purpose the manufacturer is designing that model for.
 

disneybob

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2021
Messages
6
I'm sick of the (seemingy all) lights that access modes by holding, double clicking, screwing reflector in and out etc. its all stupid to me. Fine if you just like playing with it, but picture handing the light to someone and expecting then to know exactly how it works, or even putting it away for a few months then trying to work it out again in an instant.

Is there any light on the market with intuitive switches? Say one that has 2 switches, one to turn it on and another to change intensity? What about 4 switches on/off, high/med/low, white/red and strobe all clearly marked and all with their own switches..

What light comes closest to this?
I agree with HSA that the Stinger 2020 would be one to look at.

 

fuyume

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2021
Messages
80
For a utility flashlight I like the way my Fenix E12 works, which is the same as my Leatherman Serac S3. Click to turn on (always in Lo mode) or off, tap to go Lo/Med/Hi.
 
Top