Lights Mounted on Your WEAPON....Are You in FAVOR or are OPPOSED??

beezwaxx

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I've been contemplating a weapon light for my home defense gun (carbine and pistol).

I have experimented with a mount for a 6P clone that I have, but that didn't work out well, due to the switch placement (and the cheap-o mount that I bought on eBay). A friend of mine who has spent a few years in the military (and a gear geek like me) recommended to me the Inforce WML:

wml_2-blk.jpg


http://www.inforce-mil.com/wml-black.php

This a relatively new product, but gets great reviews, and comes with an integrated Picatinny mount, so you save a bit there. It also has a programmable UI, Low - High, High - Low, and you can add a strobe functionality. It also comes in a momentary only version too.
 

m4a1usr

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This is a pretty weird thread. I don't get a warm and fuzzy from the OP with what he seems to seek. I was with the 3RD Infantry Division in 2003 and when we took Baghdad there were simple procedures when engaging targets. Doing knock knocks in Sadr City there were only 2 SOP's. IR with NOD's or full blast as many lumens as possible. No in between. Do a simple analysis. Provide enough light to light up what worries you or kill whatever worries you. If you assume harm is your top priority than as many lumens available is obvious. You wanna interject subjection? Get a lawyer.

If you are civie take a gun handing course for nigh fire training. If you don't know what is needed than don't guess. Opinion means nothing without experience behind it.
 

bnemmie

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In Favor.

I wear contacts or glasses. At night if I cant see clearly I need all the help I can get to properly identify my target before I take any action. But on that note, I will also grab a handheld light. That way I have the option of either light or different techniques.
 

SoCalDep

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I'm a big fan of weapon-mounted lights...

Here's my main duty gun with a Surefire X300 Ultra:


And our duty rifle with Surefire 6PX Tactical:


My rifle with Streamlight TLR-2G:


My Saiga .223 with Surefire X300 Ultra:


My Benelli M2 with Surefire e2e/LX2 Head:


One of my old duty guns with Insight WX-150:
 

Kilroytheknifesnob

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I think it's very important to be able to identify what your gun is pointing at. There are a few instances of people shooting family members or friends in the dark, because they weren't expecting them to be there. That kind of thing is totally avoidable.

My main home defense weapon is a 14.5" AR-15. Using a long gun requires both hands, so I have a weaponlight mounted on it. In my opinion, unless you have night vision, your home defense long guns should have a light mounted on them.

Handguns are more of a preference thing, handheld or mounted on the gun can work. I prefer a pistol mounted light so one hand is free to open doors, call 911, etc. There are methods of holding a light that mitigate this, but I'm not familar enough with them to declare any pistol light carry method superior. What's clear is that you should have A light, mounted or not, just have one.
 

Ravus

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Another vote for weapon-mounted lights.

I have pistol-mounted lights on my personal weapons, and have used them on duty weapons as well. Sometimes it's necessary to free up the other hand for other tasks. That's not to say you SHOULDN'T carry a hand-held light as well... you should have BOTH.

There are some circumstances where you might need/want to illuminate an area without muzzle-sweeping everything in it... that would be the place for a hand-held light. If you're addressing a potential threat, the weapon-light would be the proper item to use.

The addressing-a-threat scenario presumes you have the training and discipline to keep your finger off the trigger, and a weapon held at low-ready on a potential threat should provide enough illumination from the weapon-mounted light to see hands, belt-line, and any other spots on the body you'd want to see.

Some training and experience in low-light weapon+light manipulation is highly recommended if you're planning on using such a setup.
 

UVvis

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This is a pretty weird thread. I don't get a warm and fuzzy from the OP with what he seems to seek. I was with the 3RD Infantry Division in 2003 and when we took Baghdad there were simple procedures when engaging targets. Doing knock knocks in Sadr City there were only 2 SOP's. IR with NOD's or full blast as many lumens.....
As you mentioned, keep the experience in mind...

Military ROE's are very much different than LEO UOF issues, which are very much different than civilian justified use of force. The TTP's for military actions are very much different than someone would use dealing with a bad guy breaking into your house. Litigation and life become the driving factors.
 

UnderPar

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I am personally in favor of lights mounted on the weapons, be it on a rifle or pistol. Theoretically, I do not see any safety issue on this kind of setup since the basic FA safety rules should always apply when handling one. TOP PRIORITY! That is, "never put your trigger finger on the trigger unless you are ready to fire". Accidentally firing a family member might really be an accident, but still it was because the basic FA rules wasn't followed. Just me.
 

Seattle Sparky

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I am not a fan of mounting a flashlight to a rifle or a pistol, however my 12 ga shotgun has one fenix tk22 with a cord switch attached. The answer to this question is going to be strictly subjective, whatever you are more comfortable with. I personally would be ok with having a flashlight in a separate hand of a pistol, which can be tricky to do with a shotgun, hence I mounted a light right on it. I don't normally hold my finger on a trigger until I am ready to pull it, and when I am ready to pull it, I better know 100% what the target is. Having to hold a light in a separate hand may create a problem to guys not so comfortable with multitasking, in my opinion. However, I am not an expert, so take it with a grain of salt.
 

GRunner

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Hi Nalapombu,

I'd like you to try something that may help you decide on a firearm light. Take a flashlight, just a flashlight - no firearm go to a dark area in your home. A hallway or any area you would have to check. Holding the light as if it were you firearm at a low ready type stance shine the light at the floor about half way between you and the end of the hallway. The spill from the light should be more than enough to light the hallway to see if it is friend or foe. If it was a dangerous person it would take very little to raise the firearm and protect yourself.

This way your not aiming a firearm "AT" a person but safely at the floor, your finger should be off the trigger and outside the trigger guard. It takes but a fraction of a second to move it onto the trigger.

Try a few lights and see what kind of beam is best for you. Than try to find a light to mount that most meets that light level.

Good luck and stay safe.
 

Kestrel

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Six posts have been deleted for being off-topic. If folks want to discuss the advantages & disadvantages of .223 vs 45 ACP vs 12ga buckshot there are firearms forums for that. I thought I made this position very clear back in post # 15:
[...] please keep in mind that we need to stick to the topic of lighting; there are many good firearms forums to peruse for non-lighting info.
 

cland72

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I am not a fan of mounting a flashlight to a rifle or a pistol, however my 12 ga shotgun has one fenix tk22 with a cord switch attached. The answer to this question is going to be strictly subjective, whatever you are more comfortable with. I personally would be ok with having a flashlight in a separate hand of a pistol, which can be tricky to do with a shotgun, hence I mounted a light right on it. I don't normally hold my finger on a trigger until I am ready to pull it, and when I am ready to pull it, I better know 100% what the target is. Having to hold a light in a separate hand may create a problem to guys not so comfortable with multitasking, in my opinion. However, I am not an expert, so take it with a grain of salt.

Why aren't you a fan of mounting a light to your pistol or carbine?
 

Seattle Sparky

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Why aren't you a fan of mounting a light to your pistol or carbine?
Too keep the unnecessary bulk off. My pistols are concealed carry most of the time, and if need arises it's fairly easy to use a separate light in conjunction with it. As for my carbine, I just never use it at night or in a dark conditions. It's primarily for target practice, but I may install a small light on it now, if end up using it for home defense.
 

cland72

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Too keep the unnecessary bulk off. My pistols are concealed carry most of the time, and if need arises it's fairly easy to use a separate light in conjunction with it. As for my carbine, I just never use it at night or in a dark conditions. It's primarily for target practice, but I may install a small light on it now, if end up using it for home defense.

The OP was asking specifically about home defense use, but I see your point on concealed carry.

I'm a believer that if you have a weapon in a home defense role, it should have a light on it. The freaks come out at night...
 

SCEMan

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A couple weeks ago I had my home alarm go off (first time in 15 years) at 3:30 AM. Navigating the stairs & clearing the downstairs area was a simple process thanks to the weapon light on my Para Ordnance P14-45 :thumbsup:
 

BillSWPA

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Very good points above re: using the spill of the light. In a home defense situation one of my first tasks will be to verify the location of my wife and kids and get them in a location that I have cleared and that can easily be kept safe. With that accomplished, anyone else I run into probably should have a gun pointed at them, as well as the light shining directly towards their eyes.
 

idleprocess

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I have a TLR-2 mounted to my nightstand pistol. I've tried to walk around with the gun in one hand and flashlight in the other and found that I prefer having a free hand to the more fine control I can exert on a flashlight in my other hand.

Not sure there's such a thing as an adequately compact light for my carry pistol - night sights seem like a greater priority.
 

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