Lithium vs Alkaline for emergency

MidnightDistortions

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Re: Battery Question (Alkaline Leaks)

I've seen them leaking in packages in stores on many occasions and they were still within the date stamp on them. The last ones I saw leaking was in a 4 pack of coppertop duracell AAAs in a BigLots store about 2 months ago.

The warehouse must not store them properly or something. Either that the stores around here pull them off the shelf before i get a chance to see packaged leaky alkalines.
 

Lynx_Arc

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Re: Battery Question (Alkaline Leaks)

The warehouse must not store them properly or something. Either that the stores around here pull them off the shelf before i get a chance to see packaged leaky alkalines.

Who knows the reason it could be a lot of reasons but I suspect it is just cheaper design by the manufacturer to save that extra penny per battery or whatever that causes more of them to leak these days than 20 years ago.
 

NoNotAgain

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In the last five years or so, alkaline batteries have got much worse in regards to leaking. I suspect that due to fierce competition between the manufacturers that the process has been cheapened up.

After having alkaline batteries trashing a few Nikon Speedlights and emergency use flashlights, I'm totally done with alkaline cells.

It's a given that you're going to forget devises that have cells installed only to find at a later date that the contacts are corroded away due to leaky cells.

Lithium primary cells to date have proven a much safer alternative to alkaline cells.

Surefire is confident enough to install their lithium cells in many of their lights, not just packaging them with the light.

Recently many states have changed their fire code regulations to require lithium cells only for smoke detectors.
 

Lynx_Arc

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In the last five years or so, alkaline batteries have got much worse in regards to leaking. I suspect that due to fierce competition between the manufacturers that the process has been cheapened up.

After having alkaline batteries trashing a few Nikon Speedlights and emergency use flashlights, I'm totally done with alkaline cells.

It's a given that you're going to forget devises that have cells installed only to find at a later date that the contacts are corroded away due to leaky cells.

Lithium primary cells to date have proven a much safer alternative to alkaline cells.

Surefire is confident enough to install their lithium cells in many of their lights, not just packaging them with the light.

Recently many states have changed their fire code regulations to require lithium cells only for smoke detectors.

I have only heard of one instance on the forum over the last 10 years of someone having a lithium primary battery leaking on them and I think the damage was minimal and I think it wasn't a known brand of lithium battery either. As far as I know lithium primaries just don't leak at all.... ever.
I just wish lithium primaries were cheaper instead of costing as much as LSD nimh.
 

Berneck1

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I have only heard of one instance on the forum over the last 10 years of someone having a lithium primary battery leaking on them and I think the damage was minimal and I think it wasn't a known brand of lithium battery either. As far as I know lithium primaries just don't leak at all.... ever.
I just wish lithium primaries were cheaper instead of costing as much as LSD nimh.

Yeah, the lithiums are somewhat cost prohibitive. I only have them as emergency backup. However, it has forced me to use Eneloops which is not a bad thing at all. In the long run, I have saved a ton of money, and have no issues with leaking.


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Lynx_Arc

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Yeah, the lithiums are somewhat cost prohibitive. I only have them as emergency backup. However, it has forced me to use Eneloops which is not a bad thing at all. In the long run, I have saved a ton of money, and have no issues with leaking.


Sent from my iPad using Candlepowerforums
Ironic that the cost of lithiums which is often used to replace alkalines pushes people into using eneloops instead as the price is the same. Maybe one day Energizers patent on lithium AA/AAA batteries will be history and other brands will be sold and the price will drop to half. I would probably use lithiums more in stuff if they were a dollar each or ever $1.25 each.
 

Poppy

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I believe an alkaline D cell at very low current can supply in excess of 15Ah. You used to be able to buy 1D LED lights that used a boost circuit and a single 5mm LED and would run for something like 100 hours

I just pulled the plug on a run time test with 3D carbon-zinc batteries and a single emitter and a resistor. It ran initially at 170 lumens and a little over 1,000 hours it was probably at 0.05 lumens.
 

H-Man

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I just pulled the plug on a run time test with 3D carbon-zinc batteries and a single emitter and a resistor. It ran initially at 170 lumens and a little over 1,000 hours it was probably at 0.05 lumens.

I have a light that has clocked at least 10,000 hours on a set of AA eneloops. Is it dim? Yes, but that only matters if you don't need light. It draws something around .10-.15 mA (I think it is about 3mA-6mA to make a lumen depending on the emitter so it is close to the brightness of your lantern.)

It is a 5mm LED stuck into a HF 2AA minimag look alike, on eneloops it has a fair bit flatter regulation vs alkalines.
 

Lynx_Arc

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I have a light that has clocked at least 10,000 hours on a set of AA eneloops. Is it dim? Yes, but that only matters if you don't need light. It draws something around .10-.15 mA (I think it is about 3mA-6mA to make a lumen depending on the emitter so it is close to the brightness of your lantern.)

It is a 5mm LED stuck into a HF 2AA minimag look alike, on eneloops it has a fair bit flatter regulation vs alkalines.
One thing I have in my pocket is an old UK 2AAA side by side light that I swapped in a head from a rayovac keychain LED light turning it to a direct drive light. I put in 2 lithium AAAs and basically use it as a battery carrier for my LD01SS light but if needed the higher voltage of the lithiums have the light putting out about 10-15 lumens or so for probably days. I haven't had to use the batteries since I put them in as backup I've probably had them in there since 2010 when I got the Fenix light.

I would like to say direct drive LED lights (2 ~1.5v cells) are a great choice for emergencies when you don't need a lot of light and cheap incans converted to direct drive LEDs that can be fed with cheap disposable batteries are IMO preferred over using lithiums as the cost of runtime is dirt cheap and you can sometimes get 30 batteries for the price of 4 lithium batteries. It is only when you find yourself not using your emergency stash of batteries in over 5 year increments that lithiums start being a competing factor in cheap throwaway lights. For occasional use nimh direct drive is wonderful and IMO lithium direct drive is more useful due to it is brighter but kind of a waste because at the low levels of power needed a lithium battery doesn't give you any advantage over an alkaline other than storage length and leakage problems.
 

SaraAB87

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Re: Battery Question (Alkaline Leaks)

I have yet to see an alkaline leak in the pack. I have, however seen them leak in devices which is usually a pain to clean out, with all that powdery white stuff. There was one battery that looked like it burned the heck out of a negative connection on my PS2 DVD remote.

I have had them leak on at least 3 occasions while just sitting in my battery box. It's a plastic box with compartments, if I had left them in the pack they would have leaked in the pack.
 

H-Man

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One thing I have in my pocket is an old UK 2AAA side by side light that I swapped in a head from a rayovac keychain LED light turning it to a direct drive light. I put in 2 lithium AAAs and basically use it as a battery carrier for my LD01SS light but if needed the higher voltage of the lithiums have the light putting out about 10-15 lumens or so for probably days. I haven't had to use the batteries since I put them in as backup I've probably had them in there since 2010 when I got the Fenix light.

I would like to say direct drive LED lights (2 ~1.5v cells) are a great choice for emergencies when you don't need a lot of light and cheap incans converted to direct drive LEDs that can be fed with cheap disposable batteries are IMO preferred over using lithiums as the cost of runtime is dirt cheap and you can sometimes get 30 batteries for the price of 4 lithium batteries. It is only when you find yourself not using your emergency stash of batteries in over 5 year increments that lithiums start being a competing factor in cheap throwaway lights. For occasional use nimh direct drive is wonderful and IMO lithium direct drive is more useful due to it is brighter but kind of a waste because at the low levels of power needed a lithium battery doesn't give you any advantage over an alkaline other than storage length and leakage problems.

I run this light 24/7/365 because besides the curiosity about how long it can go on NiMH (I swapped out the eneloops after a year and drained them, they had 600 mah left which would run it for at least another 6 months) I'm able to always find my flashlights in the event of a power failure without knocking anything over or stubbing a toe in the process.


For lithium direct drive, I'd prefer a 1xCR123 powered light because I don't have to worry about cell reversal and a depleted CR123 can still run a 5mm LED pretty bright.
 
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MidnightDistortions

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Re: Battery Question (Alkaline Leaks)

I have had them leak on at least 3 occasions while just sitting in my battery box. It's a plastic box with compartments, if I had left them in the pack they would have leaked in the pack.

A good reason why i don't put alkalines in a battery box. I just use an empty lunch meat container, luckily they don't leak but a few batteries have been growing some white corrosive material. With that being said i'm fairly close of using up all the alkalines i had collected over the years, sometimes they'll get used for experiments, others are in devices i'm not too worried about. I'm slowly collecting Eneloops to replace all my devices as well, i don't want any leaking batteries :). Until then my crap batteries is taking up some of the low drain devices (like remotes) because i don't want those things to get ruined by alkaleaks.
 

Tjin

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Re: Battery Question (Alkaline Leaks)

I primarily use Eneloops for regular use and have enough left in reserve that they will cover most emergency's.

I have some alkalines for equipment which are worth very little (bicyle lights) or emergency equipment which require alkaline batteries; most smoke detectors (9V battery have different properties than the alkaline ones), avalanche peepers (says alkaline only on the package, besides get replaced regularly and worn under your jacket), ATEX certified equipment (often only certified using one battery time; alkaline), etc.

A few stacks of AA lithium batteries for longer emergency's,
 
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