Lumileds 5W Luxeon Announced

Klaus

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Duggg,

I would think a 6D Mag using NiMhs would be almost perfect too - 5 cells under 700ma load might drop too much ?

Klaus
 

lemlux

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How about a Double Barrelled PT 600 (6 C cells) if the heat sinking can be made adequate?

Or another use for a converted serial DB 6AA.

Maybe the march of technology will persuade Energizer to introduce the rechargeable Nimh DB 6AA serial 5 Watt Luxeon. On the other hand, they probably won't be willing to confuse their customers with some serial and some serial / parallel DB's
 

hairydogs

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when voltage regulator is added to the 6D, the flashlight will run for a long time, I presume. In fact, this is one of the dream lights for the flasholic - 61 p brightness at a fraction of the running cost.

But how long? 30 hr at full brightness would be fine.
 

The_LED_Museum

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Heat will be your greatest enemy with this new LED. It will be like cramming 4 or 5 of the current Luxeons in the same space and expecting your current thermal management to deal with 4-5x the heat within the same space and using the same mechanics.

Eventually, we'll see a Luxeon based flashight head built into a round, finned CPU heatsink. Case modding websites might begin to see a jump in visitors as CPF'ers go there seeking the ultimate heatsink for their 5W and 10W Luxeon mods.
grin.gif
 

ElektroLumens

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by The LED Museum:
Heat will be your greatest enemy with this new LED. It will be like cramming 4 or 5 of the current Luxeons in the same space and expecting your current thermal management to deal with 4-5x the heat within the same space and using the same mechanics.

Eventually, we'll see a Luxeon based flashight head built into a round, finned CPU heatsink. Case modding websites might begin to see a jump in visitors as CPF'ers go there seeking the ultimate heatsink for their 5W and 10W Luxeon mods.
grin.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

considering the fantastic heat sink qualities of a Mag Lite, it would probably be able to sink the heat. If not, I could envsion some heat sink fins on the outside. What a bizzar looking flashlight.

I have use CPU heat sinks for cooling a Luxeon Star, and they work fantastic. How odd looking to have a flashlight with a CPU heat sink on the head!

It is possible to run the new 5 watt luxeon below the maximum current, and still get a good amount of light.

Wayne www.elektrolumens.com
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dat2zip

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I had to read the article several times. I mis read it the first time. It says the 1W models are available NOW at Future electronics. The 5W model there is no reference to timeline. I just called both Future and Lumileds and Future knew nothing. The rep at Lumileds says the target release date is July 1st and they will be available through the distributors at that time.

Additionally, in my conversation, he told me that they are doing several things to improve the process. One is the move to screening and bin grading the LEDs. They can do this now, but, not at speed. They are incorporating the testing and grading into the high speed lines and when this is completed they will have graded options.

Also, and this was the cool tidbit was the new phosphor coating technology they will be shifting to. They will be doing a two pass phosphor coating on all sides, test and then apply a second coat to correct for color grade or leveling the 1st coat out. With the new phosphor coating method they will be able to control the uniformity out much better. When this all will take place is TBD.


<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR> The Luxeon 5-Watt is available in a single-emitter configuration that is pre-mounted on aluminum-core printed circuit board. Available colors are white, green, cyan, blue and royal blue. Luxeon 1-Watt Light Sources are available unmounted as single emitters, or pre-mounted in linear, ring and flood patterns in white, green, blue, cyan, red, red-orange and amber. Both can be purchased through Future Electronics (1-800-FUTURE1) or direct from Lumileds. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Stupid: The first sentence references the 5W and the rest of the paragraph refers to the 1W model (IMHO). It says both but that is incorrect.
 

Lux Luthor

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dat2zip,

Did they mention anything about what kinds of grading? Besides output and color, the current draw seems to vary quite a bit on their 1W models. Perhaps that's covered by the output grading, but I'm not sure about that.
 
D

**DONOTDELETE**

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Klaus:
I would think a 6D Mag using NiMhs would be almost perfect too - 5 cells under 700ma load might drop too much ?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You have to consider the high water mark---six fully charged NiMH D cells will put out over 8 volts for quite a while.

If people are apprehensive about putting 4 volts through a $16 unit, imagine their concern putting 8 volts through a $50 unit...
 

Jonathan

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With respect to LED grading:

I am using the Lumileds 'Superflux' LEDs. Lumileds is the (one of the??) parent companies for Luxeon. All of the superflux LEDs are graded for light output, color, and forward voltage drop, and then LEDs of the same grade are packaged into tubes of 60.

I presume that the LEDs of the same grade in the same tube are also from the same production run.

In any case, I built up an array of 3 parallel sets of 8 series LEDs, for a total of 24 LEDs. I did not use any ballast resistors to balance the current in the strings. From something like 12V to 19V applied to the array, all of the LEDs were equally bright. Had there been substantial differences in the forward voltage of any of the series strings, the strings would be at different brightness.

Now putting LEDs in series will tend to average out any substantial deviations of single LEDs, but I think that this suggests that Lumileds knows how to categorize parts.
smile.gif


-Jon

P.S. These were RED LEDs, so the forward voltage drop of 1.5 (very low current) to 2.4V (full current) is entirely expected.
 

Ron Schroeder

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ElektroLumens:
Did you use the fan too <grin>

Ron

<snip>
I have use CPU heat sinks for cooling a Luxeon Star, and they work fantastic. How odd looking to have a flashlight with a CPU heat sink on the head!
<snip>
Wayne www.elektrolumens.com
shocked.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

Gransee

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I wouldn't be suprised to see a power LED flashlight in the future with a small waterproof fan built in.

Even with the fan, it could still be more efficient than xenon or halogen. Like incandescent, wasted power in LEDs takes the form of heat. The wavelength of IR (radiant heat) emitted is a lower frequency (less energetic) with semiconductors compared to a filiment so the heat is harder to dissapate. Incandescants just flood the IR out the front lens (hence the "warm beam" effect). In some cases, up to 12 times as much IR is produced than visible light which makes them less suitable for reduced signature around NVGs.

Hopefully new LED technology will keep the ratio of efficiency/density/battery capacity/passive heat sink capability for a given power pack size/etc below the threshold where a fan must be used for a EDC class flashlight. If the density increases while the efficiency doesn't keep up, then a case of diminishing returns in the "smaller, brighter" catagory will result.

It may be a mistake for the manufacturers to refer to their parts by the power dissapation. Just like with CPU's the customer will began to equate power with MHZ instead of MIPS.

Two flashlights with the same dimensions and power pack, both with 5w units, one with a 30Lm/W part and the other with a 100Lm/W part, which one would you want? The wattage doesn't make a difference in that case, one part is ancient the other is high tech. Oh, and the other is quite a bit brighter.
smile.gif


Peter Gransee
 

Lux Luthor

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I wonder if Lumileds doesn't need to make a collimator that's optically thin in the infrared. This would help blow the IR out the front. Other than that, I think you're looking at a finned head.
 

dat2zip

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I don't think 5W is all that bad. I'm overdriving the 2D 3C Mag light with the 1 ohm resistor and with a fresh set of batteries and the LS is around 3.2 Watts. Good heatsinking to the case produces a slight warming to the touch.

5 Watts, I'd expect a slight increase in temperature, but, not too excessive.

Overdriving 2X-3X would mean 10W to 15W. I'd be really worried about that
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Of course as soon as I get one I'm going to try to push the upper limit
smile.gif
 

snakebite

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by alchemist:
or how about a Peltier heat pump


Is heat build up really a problem so long as the LED is run as intended, and not overdriven? (my knowledge of LED technology can be written on the back of a small postage stamp with a big marker)

Alan.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
it would consume more power than the led.
not practical.
conduction to a metal case is the way.
could double as a handwarmer.

smile.gif
 

JollyRoger

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Or how about water cooled? Tiny copper piping that passes by the back of the luxeon star and then winds around to other parts of the flashlight...hehe....
smile.gif
 

Lux Luthor

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You know, liquid cooling isn't a bad idea at all. But not water, since it conducts electricity unless it's free of minerals. Maybe some liquid dielectric that has a high thermal conductivity. A high heat capacity would help too. Just immerse the PCB, LED and all.

There's nothing like conduction for heat transfer. Convection requires lots of fluid motion (for mass transfer), and radiational cooling requires a large temperature gradient to be of much use. The latter would still help at the outside surface of the light, though.

There was some discussion on liquid cooling LEDs, perhaps over a year ago. I couldn't find it with a quick search. It probably wasn't the main topic of the thread.
 

Lux Luthor

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If they made smaller versions of those heat pumps, and ones that consumed less power, it would probably work pretty well. Just mount one to the back of the PCB. I wasn't quite clear on exactly how they work from reading their website, though.
 
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