Maglite ML300L LED: can bulb break or burn out?

Stevenn1

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Mar 15, 2016
Messages
7
New here. I just bought this new 3D cell flashlight. Older versions came with a replacement bulb in the tail cap, the new one does not. I know LED bulbs last longer than incandescent, but nothing lasts forever. Maglite does not offer replacement LED bulbs on website or does it talk about it on the FAQ page.

So when the bulb burns out or breaks does that mean I have to throw it all away and buy a new flashlight?
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
17,598
Location
My own little Idaho
Welcome aboard.

Well the LED in general lasts about 50,000 hours.
Unlike the regular light bulb the LED is considered a lifetime emitter. And that's why you don't see replacement 'bulbs' for LED lights.

Plus the way they are install in Mag Lites to remove it is not a simple task of unscrewing it or sliding out the pins or that sort of thing.

Unless battery leak causes the gunk to coat internal parts you should get decades of service from your new light.
 

chmsam

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 26, 2004
Messages
2,241
Location
3rd Stone
Did you read the warranty and other info that came with it?

Maglites are tough to begin with and LED's are tough too. Mostly LED's don't burn out unless run for many thousands of hours. They survive being dropped much better than incandescent bulbs.

That combination is tough. Pretty much, unless you abuse it, you'll probably never see the light fail. And anything short of abuse ought to be covered by Maglite - they have a lifetime warranty.

However, battery leakage is probably the #1 reason for failure and Maglite will not cover that, so you'd have to put in a claim with the folks who manufactured the batteries. There's another reason to not use crappy batteries.

Things to avoid:

- don't leave batteries in it if it's going to be unused for awhile (seriously, this is the biggest mistake most people make). Use quality batteries only. Only use batteries that are meant to be used in it. Don't mix and match batteries.

- don't abuse the light. It's not a hammer. Don't set it on fire. Don't throw it off of buildings. It's not a chew toy for Godzilla. Don't use it to stir cauldrons of acid. Etc.

- it's water resistant but it's not waterproof (it's not made for underwater use).

Other than that I can't think of anything. They're tough. Maglite has lots of stories on their website of how much the lights can take and that makes for amusing reading. Read the info that came with the light or read it and the FAQ on their website. All of your questions can be answered there.

I'll say it one more time, don't store batteries in something that's used only once in a great while. There's lots of info on the forum and the web about battery leakage. Most of it boils down to remove batteries if you aren't gonna use it, only use quality batteries, and only use batteries that are all fresh and that are the same type & brand. Failure to follow all of these simple rules will usually guarantee the batteries will leak.
 

Kudzu

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Messages
199
I'll say it one more time, don't store batteries in something that's used only once in a great while. There's lots of info on the forum and the web about battery leakage. Most of it boils down to remove batteries if you aren't gonna use it, only use quality batteries, and only use batteries that are all fresh and that are the same type & brand. Failure to follow all of these simple rules will usually guarantee the batteries will leak.

Better yet, get yourself a set of low-self-discharge rechargeable NiMH batteries and a charger. You'll save money in the long run and not have to worry about battery leakage.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
17,598
Location
My own little Idaho
One idea is to get some eneloops with D size adapters.


^^ these make it so you can use store bought lithium aa's as well if eneloop is not your thing.
 
Last edited:

ganymede

Enlightened
Joined
Apr 14, 2011
Messages
553
Location
The Pale Blue Dot
Leaky batteries is an issue but I think the most common mode of failure in LED lights is heat which causes the driver to fail and soldering to come loose.
 

Stevenn1

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Mar 15, 2016
Messages
7
Thanks for the replies. Yeah I noticed its not the brightest light by far, but its old school cool.

I still have a Mag 3D-cell from 20 years ago that still works fine, only issue is the rubber cover for the switch fell off and got lost - I wish I could get another one but not available on website. It came with a regular bulb then. 10 years ago I bought the Mag 3-watt LED upgrade module for $20 at Bass Pro. It about doubled the light output but it was more of a bluish color. This newer ML300L is much brighter then that LED upgrade I did.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
17,598
Location
My own little Idaho
Google 'mag 3d switch cover' and you'll see a few places selling them as well as you-tube how to's if you don't know how.
 

novice

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2006
Messages
1,032
Mr. Dean, good to hear from you! I enjoyed reading the thread you started several years back concerning the use of gel filters to warm up led tint.
 

Derek Dean

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 14, 2006
Messages
2,412
Location
Monterey, CA
Mr. Dean, good to hear from you! I enjoyed reading the thread you started several years back concerning the use of gel filters to warm up led tint.
Hey, thanks. I'm glad you enjoyed that thread. You might be interested to know that I recently purchased a Maglite ML300Lx (2D) and found that a Light Peach Filter (along with a frosted lens) cleans up the beam profile nicely. It really had a nasty looking beam when I first received it, green/cyan in the center with purple fringing and ugly ugly rings, but now it's just as sweet as can be.
 
Top