Members' experience by brand with leaking alkaline cells.

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,193
Location
John 3:16
The ones in the photo were plucked from solar lights destroyed in a windstorm and set on a shelf along with other "display" batteries like Radio Shack alkalines, Pentagon CR123's etc.
 

alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
5,199
Nickel cell do leak, but the number is negligible compared to alkaline cells.
 

Dave_H

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 3, 2009
Messages
1,307
Location
Ottawa Ont. Canada
Does this apply to NIMH cells that subjected to over current? I can see that some lights that are dual AA and 14500 could have settings above and beyond the current outputs of NiMh cells that appear to work, but are in fact frying the NiMh cell.
Just asking...
GL
I don't know about operating over-current causing venting but imagine if severe enough it could.

I've charged NiMH in fast chargers which made the cells hot (not a good thing) but have not seen venting so far. OTOH I've seen some end crystalization on NiCd and NiMH in solar garden lights where the charge current is low; so must be heat in summer or just low quality of the seals (and overall).

Dave
 
Last edited:

N8N

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
1,231
I feel like this is mostly an issue with off brand batteries. I have used energizer and duracell with no probelms of leaking. The brand that seems to leak the most for me is amazon basic brand batteries or any AA that come with chinese made products. Granted, I have used some AA lithiums for years with no problem of them leaking either.

My experience are the exact opposite. Duracell, Energizer, etc. all leak, the "off brand" ones like GP, Varta, etc. that come packaged with new battery operated devices are much less likely to do so.

I don't buy any alkalines anymore as I have had such bad experiences with them over so many years. NiMH or Energizer Lithium in everything.
 

desert.snake

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
2,035
Location
Eastern Europe
Daewoo AAA heavy duty leaked inside the flashlight, I managed to pull it out in time. I looked at the second unused package and 1 of the 4 batteries showed signs of leaking. Made in China 03.2023. It's unlikely that the flashlight is the problem, it eats about 30 mA

Oh, I was wrong, they are saline, not alkaline
 
Last edited:

PhotonWrangler

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
14,349
Location
In a handbasket
Today I grabbed my old LED tester out of my tool kit to test some LEDs. Pushed the button and... nothing. Dead battery.

I haven't used this device in ages so I was pretty worried about the possible carnage I would see when I popped off the battery cover. When I opened it up, there was a Duracell 9v with a manufacturing date of 2011 with NO leaks! I was astonished.

Looking at the battery closely, I see where the bottom is bulging a little bit but the battery's case is still completely intact. This battery says it was made in the U.S.

Was I just lucky in this case or was the U.S. battery plant doing something better back in 2011?
 

IMA SOL MAN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 18, 2023
Messages
2,126
Location
The HEART of the USA.
Today I grabbed my old LED tester out of my tool kit to test some LEDs. Pushed the button and... nothing. Dead battery.

I haven't used this device in ages so I was pretty worried about the possible carnage I would see when I popped off the battery cover. When I opened it up, there was a Duracell 9v with a manufacturing date of 2011 with NO leaks! I was astonished.

Looking at the battery closely, I see where the bottom is bulging a little bit but the battery's case is still completely intact. This battery says it was made in the U.S.

Was I just lucky in this case or was the U.S. battery plant doing something better back in 2011?
It has been my experience that 9volt bats seldom leak, but YMMV.
 

PhotonWrangler

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
14,349
Location
In a handbasket
It has been my experience that 9volt bats seldom leak, but YMMV.
Thanks guys. When I think about it, you're both right. It's usually individual cells, not batteries (which are strings of internal cells by definition) that leak. I might open up this battery just to see what condition the cells are in.

**Edit**
I opened it up and found only a tiny amount of leakage from one of the AAAA cells inside. It was completely contained within the plastic wrap around the cell bundle, and the top and bottom of the bundle was sealed with a brownish putty. I'm impressed with the integrity of the internal seals.
 
Last edited:

Toulouse42

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 14, 2008
Messages
198
Location
Jersey
Generally fine unless you leave one in a child's toy for almost 30 years. When we got the toy out for our grandson, the insides were well and truly dissolved.
 

Got Lumens?

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 12, 2011
Messages
2,457
Location
Champlain Valley
Not all 9V cells are created equally.
There are some that use 6 AAAA Alkaline's and others use 6 AAAA Zinc powered series cells, and others
that use primary lithium cells.
Check the compatible ANSI number on the 9V battery to cross reference and find out if it is the case.
Regardless, 9V cells are some of the most non destructive failing cells that do and can leak.
There are now lithium based primary, and secondary rechargeable 9V cells available to purchase to negate
the leakage damage/syndrome.
GL
 

N8N

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
1,231
I think it was because it's a 9v. That's 6 small cells in a metal case. So the steel case prevented the caustic liquid from getting out. I've never seen a 9v destroy something

This, it's "double insulated" if you will. I still use NiMH 9v batteries simply because it's always seldom used equipment that uses them.
 
Top