Modern Maglite collections

xxo

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Since I have been dreaming up new function sets, I think a good way to do a ramp would be first click medium, double click and hold for ramp low to high and 3 quick clicks for strobe or beacon mode.
 

Guitar Guy

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Oct 23, 2016
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I disagree on putting a ramp on the momentary, I would hate the light flipping through modes – when I want momentary I want it to stay on full power for however long I keep the switch pressed regardless if it's a few milliseconds or an hour. Come to think of it, I wouldn't mind a “tactical” momentary only function set that only did momentary no matter how many times you quick click the switch. Oh and a optional dual switch tailcap would be real nice too.

XX0, I think I mis-led you when I used the word "ramp". It's not actually what I meant. What I was thinking is momentary when you press it once, and for however long you hold it, like you said. It could be high mode or medium, it wouldn't matter to me, but momentary, any time you press it once. Then, from the off position, 2 quick clicks for eco, OR 3 clicks for low, 4 clicks for high, 5 clicks for strobe, similar to how it works now. I guess "progressing stages" may have been a better word than "ramp". Maybe even if the user wanted to reverse it so the stages progress from higher modes to lower would work, if they choose. In this manner, all modes would be available at all times, without having to give some up to have others, or having to switch between 4 different mode groups.

In actuality, my chinese lights are much less complicated and intuitive. Acebeam is a little tricky at first, but my Fenix lights are very un-complicated. Turn on with the tail switch, cycle through modes with the side switch, and it memorizes the last used mode when you turn it off with tail switch, and tail switch has momentary, of last used mode. Hold down side switch for strobe. If you mostly only use one particular mode, you almost never have to use the side switch, just the tail switch with momentary, or full click for on.

JT
 

xxo

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Apr 30, 2015
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XX0, I think I mis-led you when I used the word "ramp". It's not actually what I meant. What I was thinking is momentary when you press it once, and for however long you hold it, like you said. It could be high mode or medium, it wouldn't matter to me, but momentary, any time you press it once. Then, from the off position, 2 quick clicks for eco, OR 3 clicks for low, 4 clicks for high, 5 clicks for strobe, similar to how it works now. I guess "progressing stages" may have been a better word than "ramp". Maybe even if the user wanted to reverse it so the stages progress from higher modes to lower would work, if they choose. In this manner, all modes would be available at all times, without having to give some up to have others, or having to switch between 4 different mode groups.

In actuality, my chinese lights are much less complicated and intuitive. Acebeam is a little tricky at first, but my Fenix lights are very un-complicated. Turn on with the tail switch, cycle through modes with the side switch, and it memorizes the last used mode when you turn it off with tail switch, and tail switch has momentary, of last used mode. Hold down side switch for strobe. If you mostly only use one particular mode, you almost never have to use the side switch, just the tail switch with momentary, or full click for on.

JT

OK, that makes sense. I misunderstood what you meant.

I still have difficulties with Chinese lights, two switches that do different things?, mode memory? now I have to think which mode I used it in last week or last month and remember which switch does what on which light...I usually end up stuck in some weird mode and I end up having to go back to the flow charts/instructions to get out of it – I guess it's a matter of what you are used to?
 

Guitar Guy

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I usually end up stuck in some weird mode and I end up having to go back to the flow charts/instructions to get out of it – I guess it's a matter of what you are used to?

Yes, I guess it's what you're used to, but there is no "weird" mode to be stuck in, and no chart needed, it is one of five brightness levels. If you don't remember where you left it, you simply click the side switch as fast as you can say 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and you easily see when you hit the brightest, and the next click is back to the lowest. I usually just go back to low when I shut it off for the day, unless I'm using level 2 or 3 for inspecting a house, where I'm turning it on and off several times for that job, and using momentary. And that's the other thing I don't like about the ML50 - momentary is always high, where sometimes I want it to be lower, or the level I'm currently using.

To me, the new Maglite system is more complicated. I have to carry the chart, or memorize the 3 modes contained in the 4 different groups. After a month goes by, I'll never remember which contains which. If I'm out in the field and don't have the chart, I'd have to program each different group, and test to see which modes each group contains, and then set it on the one I want. If I wanted strobe and was in a group that didn't contain strobe, I probably wouldn't go to that trouble. The moment would pass by. If I want a group with momentary, I have to give up one of the 3 brightness levels. If I want a group with momentary and strobe, I have to give up 2 brightness levels. I don't like it.

I like the old Mags for what they are, especially after I convert them to a good LED with glass lens and aluminum reflector. Other than the look, I'm less than impressed with the beam and the UI on the ML50XL. The ML25LT, yes I could see using it, but it's actually oversized and run time is not all that great. My Chinese Li-Ion lights are light years ahead, and leave them in the dust.

If you really like made in USA, and simplicity, my Malkoff Hound Dog is even better. On click tail switch. Rotate the head all the way tight for full 1000 lumens, loosen it just slightly for low, and that's it. Two modes and built like a tank in good ole USA. Leaves them all in the dust.

Good discussion, and thanks for the input.

JT
 

bykfixer

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6-AFC14-DF-F6-FA-43-AE-B6-D1-A33-D13067365.jpg

Three modern Solitaires, 37, 47 and 36 lumen warm.
There was reportedly a 40(?) lumen one that came in a 'value pack' at Wally World one year.

5-B458-B52-C4-EB-4917-A399-2-EF541-D81094.jpg

Beam shots.
The 37 is a thrower, the 47 puts out a nice broad throwey beam and so does the 36 lumen warm.

0-B33-AC03-40-B1-4196-B3-F7-00-B07-BCAEF88.jpg

Available colors for the 47 lumen version.
 
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bykfixer

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Since I have been dreaming up new function sets, I think a good way to do a ramp would be first click medium, double click and hold for ramp low to high and 3 quick clicks for strobe or beacon mode.
I have a Tana module in an E light with 18 different modes. I opted for L/M/H with memory. Without memory is also an option. But it's cumbersome to get to the mode you want.

I like the way Mag is set up where you unscrew the tailcap a bit, hold the power button, tighten the tailcap and count the (slow timed) flashes. Not that I want 18 options in a Maglite, but if they ever add to the menu it's not hard to achieve your goal.
Same with Streamlights ten tap option.

I like Pelicans "fuel remaining" mode too. Half press 4 times quckly and count flashes in 1/4 tank incriments. Two flashes means 50% remains. One means carry spare batteries. Now would that work in the case of one 21700 in an adapter versus 2 D cells? (shrugs shoulders) I dunno.

One thing I'm not pleased with about their electronic switch with their ML150 lineup is the battery does not seem to have a low voltage cut off circuit. I left the tailcap screwed tight for about 6 months without charging it as a test and it murdered the battery. The battery would no longer take a charge. A $30 mistake on my part, but since Maglite assumes folks will keep it on a charger when not in use they don't seem mind. So keep that in mind all who own an ML150.
 

Ishango

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One thing I'm not pleased with about their electronic switch with their ML150 lineup is the battery does not seem to have a low voltage cut off circuit. I left the tailcap screwed tight for about 6 months without charging it as a test and it murdered the battery. The battery would no longer take a charge. A $30 mistake on my part, but since Maglite assumes folks will keep it on a charger when not in use they don't seem mind. So keep that in mind all who own an ML150.
Thanks for the tip, that might really save me some money (getting Maglite batteries in Europe is expensive). I've set a monthly reminder to charge the ML150LR now (I do charge it when I've used it for a longer period, but this seems like some solid maintenance advise).
 

bykfixer

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When you put it away just twist the tailcap loose about a full rotation. What I do is turn it on, twist the tailcap until the light turns off then another half turn or so.

But yeah charging it monthly is a good idea. I should do same.

Apparently this is bykfixer post # 15,000.
Wow!
 

Ishango

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When you put it away just twist the tailcap loose about a full rotation. What I do is turn it on, twist the tailcap until the light turns off then another half turn or so.

But yeah charging it monthly is a good idea. I should do same.

Apparently this is bykfixer post # 15,000.
Wow!
Good idea, that works too, but this is one of my bump-in-the-night lights on my night stand, so I wouldn't want it to have the tailcap turned off. It's there with a Fenix PD36R to allow quick access to very decent lights.
 
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