Modern Technology and times

Lynx_Arc

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 1, 2004
Messages
10,773
Location
Tulsa,OK
No, the motor doesn't come on. When I rotate the tumbler and change directions quickly the belt squeaks a little. It's going to need all three pullies and a belt when I figure out why it ain't starting.
If you have a VOM take a measurement at the motor to see if it is getting power it is sounding like the timer control is gone.
 

Chauncey Gardiner

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Messages
7,797
Location
Pacific N.W.
No, the motor doesn't come on. When I rotate the tumbler and change directions quickly the belt squeaks a little. It's going to need all three pullies and a belt when I figure out why it ain't starting.

I thought the same thing when our dryer started making ahellofaracket. Well sir, all I ended-up doing was cleaning the pulley shafts and inside the pulleys with some steel wool. There was just the slightest bit of rust. I then applied some grease and presto, it was good to dry.

VvPyrdk.jpg
 
Last edited:

bykfixer

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
14,722
Location
1/2 mile past Yonder
I bought my first house in 1989. It was built in 1920. To that point it had never had a shower, a clothes dryer, heck an air conditioner. I installed something called "a shower ring" over the claw foot tub. A clothes dryer was installed in the kitchen and a 25,000 btu window unit went in the dining room.

When I moved from there I bought my grandma's house from my dad. It was built in 1969 and had never had a dryer. So it ended up with a dryer in the dining room. Thing was in that house it was built by a rich home builder to his wife's specs for them to retire in, yet even people with loot back then did not consider a clothes dryer as standard equipment. Yet it had central air conditioning. The builder died before the house was finished and my grandmother who worked at Miller & Rhoads at the time knew the wife from there and bought the house from her. The house had beautiful floors, wooden window blinds, a built in dishwasher, intercom system with an ultra modern FM radio to broadcast music throughout the home, yet no provisions for a clothes dryer.

Now the house I grew up in had a room off the back my dad had added on when it was being built in 1953 that had provisions for a washer and a (natural gas) dryer for the eventual day the clothes dryer became affordable. He thought ahead like that. He used his GI Bill money from his time in Korea to put a down payment on the place. He said back then it took 6 months to build a house. He had natural gas hot water, refrigerator and stove for times when the power was out life could be pretty close to normal with a few oil lamps lit after dark. Once while in rehab in his twighlight years a therapist was working on his reasoning skills and asked "what would you do if your car ran out of gas in the middle of a bridge"……he replied "I wouldn't run out of gas". She tried and tried to get him to reason what he would do in that situation and I finally said "look lady, this man has probably never had less than a quarter tank of gas at anytime since the 1970's fuel embargo"……She said "fair enough, what would you do if you bounced a check?" I rolled my eyes thinking oh Lord here we go again……he replied "I'd never bounce a check" to which she says "but what if?" He he looked at me and replied "can we stop this and get some lunch?" The therapist asked again. He yells out "look lady, you might bounce a check but I don't now stop asking me stupid questions"…… and with that we went to lunch.

The house I live in now was built in 1960 and did not have a washer or dryer until the original owner "walled in" a portion of the kitchen/dining area for a very small laundry room in the 1970's. Back then in its original state the washing machine was on a screened in back porch. That must have really sucked in winter. (My neighbor across the street grew up in the house I live in and told me how happy his mother was to have an indoor laundry facility.)

So being used to the idea of not having a clothes dryer, when Mrs Fixer and I bought the house we live in now I added a clothes line between the back deck and a shed with a pulley system like folks used to use between apartment buildings in New York a long time ago. I ended up building a few actually. Some of my elderly neighbors were so impressed they wanted one too. One wanted hers mounted with hooks so that when she entertained she could take the cords down before company arrived.
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
6,048
Location
Northern New Jersey
Periodically, I would have to lube those roller pulleys pictured below. They'd start squeaking. Like Chauncey, I'd have to pull them off and clean the shaft they sat on. Or I'd hit them with some WD40. A couple of times, I had to replace the tensioner pully. It was made of plastic, and would get stuck, and then the belt would wear it FLAT on one side.

I had tried WD40, 3 in one oil, and high temperature bearing grease. I don't recall which one seemed to last longer.

The second, or third time, I had to replace the tensioner pulley, I asked the parts guy... "What kind of grease do you use on them?" His response was... NONE! Like with your gun slides, you oil them, and then wipe them dry. If you oil them and leave it, the oil collects dust and eventually makes the pulley get stuck."

I wonder how well lithium grease would work out, or graphite?


I thought the same thing when our dryer started making ahellofaracket. Well sir, all I ended-up doing was cleaning the pulley shafts and inside the pulleys with some steel wool. There was just the slightest bit of rust. I then applied some grease and presto, it was good to dry.

VvPyrdk.jpg
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
14,722
Location
1/2 mile past Yonder
At one point I used to use a "density guage" at work that involved shoving a rod through a shaft inside of the body of the machine, then into a small hole I'd have punched into the dirt or gravel. Now the rod would get coated with dust from the gravel or dirt when used to check dirt for density.
The machine came lubed with a special grease to protect o'rings from being decayed by petroleum product based grease. However grease being grease, it caused dirt or dust to cling to it.

Now this machine weighs about 60 pounds due to a lead encased nuclear source pill on the tip of the rod. A source on the machine knows how much radiation is coming from the pill. When the pill is shoved into the hole it reads how much radiation still reaches the source. The less radiation it reads the more densely packed the soil is.

So you're carrying this heavy so n so in the hot summer sun because when building a road you have removed the shade trees. And you're a 5lb hammer, a 3lb hole puncher and a metal plate used as a template to punch the hole correctly. Then you get to wack the hole puncher about 20 times like a railroad worker driving a spike. If all goes well you did not hit a rock which causes you to have to smash the hole punch even harder. Then you get to shove this dirt covered nuclear source rod into the hole you punched and take a reading by pushing some buttons on the 60lb so n so. The source rod covered with greasy dirt refuses to move.

Enter graphite powder. I'd remove the grease and pour on graphite powder and massage it into the metal source rod. Viola! No more sticking source rod. But the graphite powder did not last but a couple of tests. Enter graphite spray!! Viola!
That stuff lasted all day. No dirt or dust stuck to the source rod yet it slid like glass on ice. Trouble was it's messy. It cleans up easy enough, but man that stuff spreads around like chewing gum on a parking lot in summer.

In other words, graphite spray from an auto parts store is a great lube when dust and dirt are an issue. You just have to reapply it every so often. Enter teflon spray.
Works like graphite spray but lasts longer.
 

greenpondmike

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
1,058
Location
South
Poppy, a do it yourself fellow on youtube posted a video while he was fixing the same thing. The people at the appliance parts store recommended lithium grease- just a dab on the shaft and nowhere else.

Thanks Chauncey. If the top of the pullies aren't worn it might be best just to clean and polish the inside of the pullies and do the same for the shafts.

I understand what you're saying bykfixer. All my mother ever used was a clothes line. They didn't even get a phone or a microwave till me and my first wife got those and then they (especially dad) used them like they were catching up for lost time.

Me and my first wife (Jenny) made due with a clothesline for a while till a young pervert called our landline and told Jenny that he could see her underwear on the line. We lived next to a boy's group home for younguns with behaviour problems. After that we put a line on the inside- besides Bandit, out bird dog kept pulling clothes and sheets off the line and ants would use the line as a super highway and we had to shake them off the clothes. Aaah- typical country life.
 
Last edited:

greenpondmike

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
1,058
Location
South
Bykfixer, you can't teach those young whipper snappers anything. Time they decide to seek our wisdom we'll probably be dead.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
14,722
Location
1/2 mile past Yonder
What's old is new again:

40-D87496-C4-B8-4-C46-ABA7-591-DD2-E29-E57.jpg

A modern version of the Craftsman by Eastland.
A couple years back Keen took a look at some old tech and improved on the idea.
Many reading this may remember seeing somebody wearing those Craftsman wedge boots around the work shop or at the local mechanics garage. They, like Craftsman wrenches came with a lifetime warranty so when the soul wore out Sears would replace the sole or if the upper went bad they'd replace the entire boot(s). They were ugly as a mud fence but many old school guys swore by them. Trouble was the leather was stiff as a board when new and the soles did not have much grip outside the concrete jungle.
Keen took the idea and instead of the soft crepe' sole they used air infused urethane to come up with the same all day supporting sole but added a layer of a fairly hard urethane bonded to the softer urethane. The wedge sole itself is an old school way of spreading the load as it were. That idea goes back centuries and like the fact that something round will roll, it still applies in 2020.

But now everybody and his brother is churning out old Craftsman style wedge boots. The photo above is a shoe sold by Kohls. So out with the tan Timberland with art gum looking soles, and in with that ugly Craftsman look. Timberland has one now as well. Heck, even Craftsman has added that layer of hardened urethane to theirs. Now the crepe' is a midsole and the long wear surface an outsole.

I tried the Keen version and it became my favorite work boot. Then after a few months I replaced the insoles with Keen made ones and it was like having a brand new pair of boots. Keen offers a water proof version. They are called San Jose' 6" and they are water tight without that feeling of wearing a plastic bag over your foot. They offer about as much traction on wet grass as running shoes too.

I'm glad to see Wolverine, Danner, Rocky, and a ton of other brands now offer a Craftsman crepe' sole style work boot. Millions of happy feet lie ahead thanks to what's old is new again.

How many remember kids with bread bags over their shoes in the snow? It worked fairly well so long as you walked in snow only and not on concrete or pavement.
 

idleprocess

Flashaholic
Joined
Feb 29, 2004
Messages
6,077
Location
dfw.tx.us
I'm trying to train these youngsters how to live internet free and still enjoy the modern conveniences but it's as if I'm trying to explain madness to a crazy man.

In an era where cheap flash memory can store more data in an area a fraction of the size of a postage stamp than the hard drives of less than a decade ago could manage, the choice to introduce the additional complexity of streaming also confuses. But perhaps it's a general function of age - my desire for novelty declined sharply a ~decade ago. I generally know what I like and assured access is far more important than discovery of possibly interesting new content.
 

jtr1962

Flashaholic
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
Messages
6,242
Location
Flushing, NY
I don't get streaming myself. I really don't. You never really own anything with streaming. If the streaming service you're paying goes belly up, you just lost access to everything. Besides, you're dependent upon always having an Internet connection. Additionally, there's the fact you're also introducing unnecessary traffic on the Internet by needing to stream something every time you watch or listen to it.

I might get streaming if data storage were still limited and very expensive. However, the rise of streaming is almost a contradiction. Just when it becomes easy and convenient to store tens of thousands of songs, or hundred of movies, locally everyone decides to just stream them instead, basically creating a lot of redundant internet traffic in the process. I get why companies pushed people towards streaming. For them it's an income stream instead of a one-time purchase. But it's bad for the end user. I like to own things, meaning I'll have them even if the Internet disappears entirely.

They're even trying to do this with software, where you don't install the software on your hard drive. You stream it instead every time you use it. :banghead: I don't know how people can not see the huge downside of that.
 
Last edited:

Poppy

Flashaholic
CPF Supporter
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
6,048
Location
Northern New Jersey
Years ago, about 1985, Star Trek TOS aired each night at 11:00 PM. I usually went to bed at 10:30, but if I was still up, I would often stay up even later and watch Star Trek, until midnight. I would watch whichever episode that aired, despite seeing each episode so many times, that I knew the dialog.

Then one night I said to myself... this is stupid! I have a VHS recorder, I should just set it to record, and then I can watch it ANYTIME!

I recorded maybe a dozen episodes, and sometimes I'd stay up and watch one anyway. Then if it was an episode that I recorded, I went to bed. At some point I realized that I wasn't watching the show anymore, because I often had it recorded, or I set the VHS to record and planned to watch it later.

I never watched any of the recorded shows.

I stopped recording them, and deleted the episodes I had.

Then I started watching and enjoying the shows all over again.

Last year we gave away 2 - 45 gallon containers of VHS tapes, many of them Disney movies.

Streaming works for me, for movies, and TV shows. If I owned them, I probably wouldn't watch them again.
 

Lynx_Arc

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 1, 2004
Messages
10,773
Location
Tulsa,OK
I'm different as when I started recording a series I would record a weeks worth and binge on the weekend. I got a DVR and record TV shows and skip the commercials entirely saving myself about 20 minutes of time an hour so 3 hours worth of shows plays in 2 hours. I've recorded 6 months of a show and then binged it for days on end several weekends a month now I have streaming tv stuff. The one advantage in streaming tv for me is the resolution is higher than dvd is and secondary tv channels usually are 480i. I have a lot of dvd movies but on a larger tv they look a little less crisp than streaming at 720p does, you have to go to blu-ray to look noticeably better.
I retired my VHS player when I got my hard drive DVR and now the drive is starting to fail on me and I don't record that much these days and there is going to be a new TV broadcast standard ahead that may obsolete it entirely.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
10,865
trust me get a ebike for real every person who sees mine ask to buy it lol. im thinking a just. saying ill take $1000 . it is a crazy smal folding ebike looks true bad ***
 

xxo

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 30, 2015
Messages
2,409
trust me get a ebike for real every person who sees mine ask to buy it lol. im thinking a just. saying ill take $1000 . it is a crazy smal folding ebike looks true bad ***


Been thinking of getting a ebike, but I haven't done any research into which one to get.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
Joined
Aug 11, 2003
Messages
10,865
why dont we use dc voltage for the pwer grid? dc is way more efficient my 40 watt dc fan will blow you over lol
 

xxo

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 30, 2015
Messages
2,409
Here is mine the wheels are only 14 inches . It takes me all over town very fast and fun. Everyone who sees it wants it .it can fold up and go in even the smallest car trunk
https://photos.app.goo.gl/NesZejhVstoaEHbo9


Cool!

Not sure if I would have a need for a folder, but it might come in handy to carry it in a trunk. I saw one that had motorcycle wheels that looked pretty good too.
 

xxo

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 30, 2015
Messages
2,409
why dont we use dc voltage for the pwer grid? dc is way more efficient my 40 watt dc fan will blow you over lol


Early on they did use DC but DC doesn't travel as well over distance, so you need little power plants in each neighborhood.
 

idleprocess

Flashaholic
Joined
Feb 29, 2004
Messages
6,077
Location
dfw.tx.us
I don't get streaming myself.
I can appreciate it for the process of discovery of new music. I've considered the likes of Spotify for such given that local radio stations are either covering well-worn ground or today's equivalent of top 40 that doesn't much interest me. I'm not interested in 'buying' tracks that effectively live in the cloud (either in actuality or locally-cached files must be authorized by said cloud), but can see the value in subscribing to an all-you-can-eat service.

It's the reliance on streaming for that which one wishes to listen to regularly rather than procuring an offline copy that confuses.

They're even trying to do this with software, where you don't install the software on your hard drive. You stream it instead every time you use it. :banghead: I don't know how people can not see the huge downside of that.
Google Apps (Doc, Sheets, etc) is perhaps the most-often used example of this. Browsers are now sufficiently capable that web apps are good enough for more casual use. I wouldn't want to do some of my more unspeakable brute force spreadsheets in Sheets, but for most usage where there aren't thousands of formulas performing branching conditional 2D lookups it's a passable alternative to a local native executable.

Streaming works for me, for movies, and TV shows. If I owned them, I probably wouldn't watch them again.
For me, TV and movies are different from music in the sense that I might watch a movie or TV show once a year at most. I'm also almost universally at home with solid internet connectivity, thus streaming is reasonably reliable.

My main gripe about video streaming is the horrific fragmentation of the market and the resulting penalty to user experience. Managing multiple accounts is an annoyance, but the fact that one also has to use every provider's bespoke application to access content is aggravating. I'm willing to pay for content and may well want to wander into Netflix's app so I can see whatever their algos think I want to watch, but I may well want to watch, say, The Expanse and The Mandelorean without wading through the Prime and Disney+ apps respectively.
 

greenpondmike

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
1,058
Location
South
If you have a VOM take a measurement at the motor to see if it is getting power it is sounding like the timer control is gone.

It's getting power at the plug, so I need to test the rest now. Them rats got my light working in the utility room again and I was suspicious that they did something to the 220 wires. I guess they did to the 220 wires the ac plugs in. It runs 5 minutes and pops real bad and trips a breaker. Cools the trailer real good till it does. My wife is scared to use it like that. The 220 wire is rigged from the old central air unit and dogs might have hit it chasing the cats.

I hear you bykfixer on the graphite and teflon sprays.
 
Last edited:
Top