Music - Just plain bad.

idleprocess

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At some point in my 30s I realized that I not only no longer cared to stop keeping up with popular music but had also stopped trying. It was tremendously liberating because it had also moved directions I just wasn't interested in. Some of it is the passing of youth and the sense of now and my generation's music being not as important as it once was. There's also recognition of the repetition of themes, instrumental bits, and overall borrowing - all presented as new - which I'm sure my parents' generation recognized in my generation's music.

I do have an irrational dislike for Ed Sheeran. But it's simply a personal aversion - I don't wish him to be erased from existence and I don't care if he's someone's favorite musician - I simply wish not to listen to his songs.

As a white dude I also sense that I'm ultimately not invited to a number of genres such as hip-hop and other genres associated with minority cultures in this country. I'm curious about some, but the underlying references and language is not always familiar nor accessible.
 

PhotonWrangler

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At some point in my 30s I realized that I not only no longer cared to stop keeping up with popular music but had also stopped trying. It was tremendously liberating because it had also moved directions I just wasn't interested in. Some of it is the passing of youth and the sense of now and my generation's music being not as important as it once was. There's also recognition of the repetition of themes, instrumental bits, and overall borrowing - all presented as new - which I'm sure my parents' generation recognized in my generation's music.

I do have an irrational dislike for Ed Sheeran. But it's simply a personal aversion - I don't wish him to be erased from existence and I don't care if he's someone's favorite musician - I simply wish not to listen to his songs.

As a white dude I also sense that I'm ultimately not invited to a number of genres such as hip-hop and other genres associated with minority cultures in this country. I'm curious about some, but the underlying references and language is not always familiar nor accessible.
I think a lot of this is that the music that we listened to in our teens made an impression on us that we identified with strongly because it became an integral part of our coming of age. And that soundtrack became less important once we got past that stage and moved on with living our adult lives and figuring things out as we go I remember that the music of my teens meant significantly more that it does now. I still enjoy it as well as other artists' work; I just don't cling to in in the same way any more. Plus I'm too old for sock hops. ;)
 

idleprocess

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I think a lot of this is that the music that we listened to in our teens made an impression on us that we identified with strongly because it became an integral part of our coming of age. And that soundtrack became less important once we got past that stage and moved on with living our adult lives and figuring things out as we go I remember that the music of my teens meant significantly more that it does now. I still enjoy it as well as other artists' work; I just don't cling to in in the same way any more. Plus I'm too old for sock hops. ;)
The soundtrack of adolescence and young adulthood will likely always be of a notch greater import to me than popular music before and after. I do however readily concede it was a highly subjective time and place that cannot be replicated, and that the process of mass historiography will inevitably define it differently than I remember.

I was moderately pained when the last hard rock station in the region folded up shop, promptly followed by the classic rock station rebooting itself and incorporating much of the former station's selections into their playlists. But I knew it was an inevitability whose time had come. Another more distant inevitability - the FM spectrum going quiet since radios in cars are becoming an anachronism.

Anyway. This is OT. Let the gnashing of teeth at disliked music continue.
 

bykfixer

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I'm going to beat on country music some more. Never was a fan of old school country but always appreciated the value of great song writing. But this garbage they call country anymore is pathetic in my view. There's a bbq joint I like to go to but in the background is playing a counrty music "hits" station. And every single solitary song is about drinking to excess and fornicating.

Gone are the songs about hard times or my wife left me and took my tooth brush or my dog died. No, it's drinking and (bleep)ing song after song.

Well at least they don't play country rap so there is that. If they start doing that I'll find another place to get my bbq from.
 

TPA

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I can think of several right off the top of my head. Not sure I want to name & shame them though.
Name & Shame, name & shame! Remember, one man's trash is another's treasure...unless it's Lizzo...that's just trashy.

At some point in my 30s I realized that I not only no longer cared to stop keeping up with popular music but had also stopped trying.

I've always been on the fringes when it comes to music, almost never listening to what people my age were listening to. I grew up in a small-mid size retirement town of 30k. Local radio was...well..local radio for a town of this size. Sometime when I was young (8?) I was given an old car radio and shortwave radio. I managed to put antennas on the roof for both and listened to radio stations in the larger cities, and around the world, which were playing much better stuff than the local yokels. As far as my own listening in high school, just like today, you never knew what you'd hear coming in my car. Might be opera, polka, rock, Motown, jazz, foreign, etc.

In high school I was lucky enough to score a job with a local TV/radio broadcast group and ultimately was given a near-defunct FM talk station to do with as I pleased...and I did. They wanted the 18-36 crowd instead of the 75->grave crowd. So, I did a dance / latin pop / foreign pop format. The only way we'd play a popular US song was if we could find a good remix, and I liked it. The music consultants said this would fail... as they were trying to push Hanson's Mmmbop. I listened to that and said I'd never play it and that it was complete garbage. The reaction from the guy made you think I killed a mob boss' wife. My format worked beyond our wildest dreams.

I think a lot of this is that the music that we listened to in our teens made an impression on us that we identified with strongly because it became an integral part of our coming of age.

It's not just music, it's the whole world around you in those teen-early 20s years. I'm currently trying to get a project off the ground based on this... Unfortunately it's going to cost a lot more than I could ever dream of raising. Still trying... and hey, there's PowerBall this weekend. ;)

and since I mentioned I'd never play it on my station, and I never did, here it is:
 

bykfixer

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@TPA a buddy of mine and I had a chance to buy a low power FM station that had tried their hand at church radio. It was for sale, cheap. We had an investor willing to put up the initial cash. The idea was to build up a following, sell it a larger company and start another one somewhere else. Then do that again and again until we ended up owning one at the outter banks of North Carolina.

The music was going to be cutting edge, just arrived at the record store rock and roll. Like a college radio station. But we could not agree on the first song to play. We agreed it would be a Ramones song. He wanted to play "I want to be sedated", me "Spider Man theme". One evening we agreed to disagree. The next evening in a drunken stuper we ended up hurling insults at each other. Next evening we were fist fighting over it. We didn't speak for weeks after that.

One afternoon he called me out of the blue on the phone to say the investor had backed out because "you two idiots can't agree on the first song, what else are you going to fight about?" Shortly after that somebody bought the place and sold the antenna for scrap metal, then built a car wash on the land.

We got past it and laughed about it for years. When I got sober we went our separate ways. But we remain friends to this days.
 

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