MY TIPS - to INCREASE your GAS MILAGE

TooManyGizmos

TooManyGizmos

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Messages
3,079
Location
Died Nov. 2015
~


GAS prices are HIGH ...... and still rising !!

Sometimes we forget to do routine-preventative maintanance on our vehicles .

Here are some things you may not have done recently ... but should consider !

Change your plugs and air cleaner and pour in some fuel injector cleaner to your gas tank
to improve your gas milage. At 4.00 per gallon , it should add some M.P.G's .

You might also put 2 to 3 more P.S.I. in your tires to reduce rolling resistance.
But don't add too much air which might affect traction, turning, or braking distance
and may cause hydro-planing in the rain.

Remove excess weight that may have accumulated - which robs fuel milage.

And be sure you have air pressure in your spare tire and propper flat repair tools.

These are the things we ALL ..... forget to do .

Racing to the next red light two blocks away is very bad on your milage and wallet.

~
 
ElectronGuru

ElectronGuru

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 18, 2007
Messages
6,053
Location
Oregon
Totally good tips. :thumbsup:


Consider also larger changes...

We changed a few years ago, to a vehicle with a third of the weight and 3x the MPG.

Moving somewhere less sprawled out also helps (yeah, impossible in the US for anyplace built after WWII)!

Went from spending hours every day on the freeways, filling a 30G tank every week - to walking many places in a 1920's neighborhood and filling a 15G tank once a month (annual savings: 1260G).
 
gollum

gollum

Enlightened
Joined
Mar 17, 2008
Messages
994
Location
Brisbane
living 3.2 kms from work helps a lot with extending my trips to the bowser

I am getting about 5-7 weeks out of a tank
 
H

Helmut.G

Enlightened
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
731
Location
Germany
Mythbusters already busted this one; even if you add enough PSI to make the tire dangerous, the MPG gain is negligible.
Even if that is true having the proper tire pressure or more still makes your car a lot safer, so do it anyway.
Going up from recommended pressure might have little effect, but a too low pressure will definitely increase fuel consumption.
Also if you put in more air it will last longer until you have to re-fill.




My tips:

Don't use the car for short trips. A cold engine will use like two times the fuel on the first half mile.

Buy a lightweight car.
Every time you accelerate you need to drag all those tons up to speed and every time you get a red light all that energy is GONE.
In germany this would be "Buy a lightweight DIESEL car." because diesel engines need A LOT less fuel, but I see they aren't popular in the US.

Drive in a smart way. Don't accelerate when you know you'll have to brake very soon. Every acceleration burns a lot of gas. If you have a red light, let the car roll.

Story: I was in a cab some time ago and the driver was going like an idiot (this story was not the worst he did). One time we were going at a good speed and had a red traffic light approaching in front. It was already red for some time so it was clear (small town and you know your traffic lights) that it would turn green soon.
The driver kept his foot on the gas pedal, maintained his speed and had to brake quite hard to a complete halt. Half a second after we stopped the light turned green.
Had he instead let the car roll 40 meters before the light he would never have had to even touch the brake. We could have gone faster while saving fuel.


keep a proper distance to the cars in front of you. I know this is often hard when the other guy is going so SLOWLY, but it really helps saving and safety.
If a car in front of you has to slow down in order to turn and you have no distance, you will have to slow down as well. Re-accelerating uses your expensive gas.


EDIT: I forgot this one but it's important:
Try to make little use of your air conditioning. AC needs an incredible lot of gas. Heating is fine as it uses waste heat the engine produces anyway.
Set your AC a couple degrees higher and you will save.
Open the doors only for short times when AC is active or your cool air will escape and you need more gas to make new cool air.



Tips for manual shifters:

Always go in highest gear possible. This really saves a lot and your engine loves the low RPMs.

accelerate fast while switching gears up fast When accelerating, push the gas pedal down 3/4 of the way. Most engines are most efficient around this point, by far. (only accelerate if it makes sense to accelerate of course)

go to neutral and roll when it makes sense. You wouldn't believe how far your car will roll, while the engine uses next to nothing in idle. Works especially well when going down a light hill, or on the short way to the next red traffic light.


If you want to make saving as much as you can a hobby and there's no traffic you would bother, you can alternate between accelerating in highest gear and rolling. This way when you use your engine it's in its most efficient state possible. The difference this makes is bigger than you might think.
Many engines can be as efficient as 25% (diesel 35%) but in normal driving will be around 10% or less :sick2:. That's where the difference comes from.



By the way, when going at a constant speed most cars use the least gas when you drive 35-45 MPH in highest gear.
Going slower the friction in the drive train burns your gas (especially when you need lower gears), going faster the air resistance increases.
Going faster than 80 the air resistance increases A LOT.
 
Last edited:
orbital

orbital

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Messages
3,131
Location
WI
+

~ Using particularly smooth acceleration and braking will help the most >> think smooth, smooth, smooth.
~ Make sure your transmission fluid is in tip-top condition
~ Proper tire pressure, but do not over-inflate
~ If I may add,,,,Lucas Fuel Treatment* (Injector Cleaner on label) works very well on making your engine run smooth.
The cost is easily half of what you'll get in gas savings, trust me it is. = Both Injected & carbureted setups
Iv' been using it a few years now // buy the gallon jug. {no I don't work for Lucas}
~ Make less short trips, the starting up & turning off your motor is a gas gulper
~ If its open and clear, applicable & safe, tuck in behind a semi on the highway & take a load off.....:D
~ Generally, be smart

* This is a cleaner/lubricant, not a detergent,,,,,,big difference between the two types

_______________

Lastly,,,,,With a manual transmission, don't under'rev your motor,
this will do you more harm than good in the end.
 
Last edited:
N

NonSenCe

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 23, 2008
Messages
1,574
Location
below polar circle.. in country which used to make
in cold weather. pre heat the engine with engine block warmer/ oil pan warmer.. anything colder than 30-40f weather you can help your engine by preheating it for 20mins or more (depending how cold it is out there)

more efficiency better mileage. sometimes changing the stock exhaust and intake from stock will make a difference. (making little more power, more efficiently in lower rpm can mean you do get better mileage) cost vs reward is a problem sometimes.. (so looking at the junkyards for the parts from a car with higher output might be a good option.

re-programming the chip in modern cars is also a good way to up the power and some programs actually can inprove the mileage too. ask around, see if its possible for your car.

tire sizes do matter. big and wide tires are not fuel efficient. (dont change from the original size of tyre much. wide threads eat power!) little taller profile will help with gear ratio too. and there are tires that roll easier than others. (environment green ideas offered to public) there are independent tire tests done.. check the rolling resistance on those tests and you can choose a tire that will save you few dollars on the road as it takes less power to move around.

check the aerodynamics of your car. personal experience: if it was supposed to have a protecting pan under the engine and you or someone else took it out because it was in the way while doing oil change and never installed it back.. put it back. it was meant to be there for 1. protection 2. helping with airflow. - just installing the bottom plate back helped with my cars mileage with little under 0.5mpg. (every little helps) dont have any extra airflow resistors in your car if you dont need them all the time (extra light-rack on top of pickup -more drag)

check all bearings and brakes so they are not dragging and wheels turn easily. also maintain the car otherwise too. check that everything is ok and in tune.
 
J

jtr1962

Flashaholic
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
Messages
6,496
Location
Flushing, NY
Story: I was in a cab some time ago and the driver was going like an idiot (this story was not the worst he did). One time we were going at a good speed and had a red traffic light approaching in front. It was already red for some time so it was clear (small town and you know your traffic lights) that it would turn green soon.
The driver kept his foot on the gas pedal, maintained his speed and had to brake quite hard to a complete halt. Half a second after we stopped the light turned green.
Had he instead let the car roll 40 meters before the light he would never have had to even touch the brake. We could have gone faster while saving fuel.
That's standard operating procedure for many cyclists-basically just coast when you have red in front of you. In fact, if motorists emulated what cyclists often do, they would get much better fuel economy in local driving situations.

go to neutral and roll when it makes sense. You wouldn't believe how far your car will roll, while the engine uses next to nothing in idle. Works especially well when going down a light hill, or on the short way to the next red traffic light.
Yep. Most cars will easily roll at a constant speed down a 1% or so gradient (that's a very slight hill). On level ground a car can still roll for many blocks, even from a speed of only 20 mph. Again, emulate what cyclists do. There were times I started coasting 5 or 6 blocks before a red light from an initial speed of ~20 mph. By the time I hit the intersection I was still going at 13-14 mph just as the light flipped back to green, right past the line of stopped cars which rushed past me only to hit the light. It helps also to know the timing of the lights on the roads you travel.
 
StarHalo

StarHalo

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 4, 2007
Messages
10,932
Location
California Republic
go to neutral and roll when it makes sense.

True for older cars, but not newer cars; modern cars shut off their injectors completely when left at zero throttle in gear - you would use more fuel rolling downhill in neutral (engine idling, using fuel as if it were idling) than if you left the car in gear and coasted down the hill (engine effectively off).
 
H

Helmut.G

Enlightened
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
731
Location
Germany
True for older cars, but not newer cars; modern cars shut off their injectors completely when left at zero throttle in gear - you would use more fuel rolling downhill in neutral (engine idling, using fuel as if it were idling) than if you left the car in gear and coasted down the hill (engine effectively off).
Yes you don't use any fuel that way but that's not the rolling I mean. In german we call it the "engine brake" and it has its own important use.


You can easily compare it yourself. Go 50 or 60 MPH and take the foot off the gas pedal. You're not burning ANY fuel, which is good, but your car slows down FAST because you are converting speed into heat via engine friction at high RPMs. That's good if you want to stop or for going down steep hills or mountains.

Now go those 50 or 60 again and take out the gear. You ROLL and roll on, only slowed down by the air hammering against your windshield. Yes your idling engine is still burning 1 to 2 liters an hour depending on your car but at that speed that's a more than excellent gas mileage and you just keep rolling.

There are a lot of situations where rolling is more efficient of the two.
 
Steve K

Steve K

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jun 10, 2002
Messages
2,784
Location
Peoria, IL
That's standard operating procedure for many cyclists-basically just coast when you have red in front of you. In fact, if motorists emulated what cyclists often do, they would get much better fuel economy in local driving situations.

I had the same thought... probably because I usually commute by bike!
Seeing as how a bike is very limited in power, it does teach many lessons in conserving power. Gradual acceleration, coasting, timing the arrival at a stoplight in order to not have to stop, etc. It also makes you appreciate aerodynamic drag! Pedaling into a 20mph wind will almost cut my speed in half.

If it is time to replace your car (as it is for me), there are a lot of cars now that have impressive mileage! I was looking at Mazda's "SkyActive" technology; nothing too cutting edge, but it does combine higher compression ratio, the use of the Atkinson cycle (I need to learn more about this), direct injection, 6 speed transmission, lower weight by virtue of higher strength steels, and (maybe?) better aerodynamics. I think the Mazda 3 with SkyActive is claiming 39mph on the highway.
Of course, I still prefer to bike to work! :)

Steve
 
1

127.0.0.1

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
1,000
Location
/etc/hosts
MPG ?

adjust the nut behind the wheel.


How ?
install a scanguage II, and

a) calibrate fuel consumption accurately

fill up at the same gas station and same pump with vehicle parked at
the same spot, and stop at the first click]. do this for the first few tanks to calibrate the
scanguage offset accurately.

b) calibrate actual speed vs sensed speed

drive with a GPS unit and fine-tune the speed calibration offset on the scangauge so
it exactly matches your tire diameter vs actual speed. not all tire diameters exactly match
the speedometer calibration in the car. [a 185/60 r15 from Michelin will be different than
a 185/60 r15 from Goodyear. scangauge is accurate enough to dial a 1% offset if you need it,
and GPS will tell you what the speed actually is]

c) Now it is dialed in, ...

use the scangauge to monitor current, average, and tank MPG and you can then use that
data to adjust the nut behind the wheel for -best overall mileage- and learn yourself somethin' about
how your driving affects mpg

and yes I recommend scangauge over ecometer or any other OBD-II connected device. scangauge
just gives you the data you need and it is fine tunable, therefore can be made 'most accurate'
 
V

vali

Enlightened
Joined
Jan 10, 2009
Messages
774
Location
Galicia, Spain
- buy a diesel car with manual tranny.
- be smooth.

I currently have a Passat 1.9 TDI with 130 bhp. Great car to do a lot of miles. Can do 1000 km with 60 l of fuel easily (about 45 mpg in non-flat terrain), have lots of torque to overtake a the engine will last more than the gas equivalent.

If you want a sporty drive, just forget it.

PD: diesel is about 10% cheaper than normal gas here.
 
Last edited:
orbital

orbital

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Messages
3,131
Location
WI
^

Last fall, my brother traded in his well used Cayenne for the new TDI Passat
 
H

Helmut.G

Enlightened
Joined
Nov 28, 2007
Messages
731
Location
Germany
IMO, no dumber car out there than a cayenne.
No wonder you need a 400 horsepower engine to get an acceptable driving experience when your car weights two and a half tons.
I don't get why people buy them. What's the advantage of having the heaviest car possible? If I had that kind of money to blow I'd much rather buy a half the weight, similar powered car. Much less fuel needed, much more fun.
 
orbital

orbital

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Messages
3,131
Location
WI
^

Helmut, he did a alot of towing
 
J

Jay R

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 10, 2006
Messages
1,634
Location
Bracknell, England.
By a Kia Rio Ecodynamics. 88 miles to the gallon combined cycle. Drive it carefully on the freeway and you'll get over 120 mpg easy. Course, that's proper Imperial gallons. Your little U.S gallons would only return 74mpg combined and something over 110mpg on the highway. Give it a few months and a bunch more cars will come out with the same or similar engines. You could get a Skoda Fabia estate now that will do 83mpg so around 75miles per U.S. gallon.
Sound good, well when gas costs $10 a gallon as it does over here, the car makers appreciate that they have to produce something a bit more economical if they want to sell any cars.
 
Last edited:
Illum

Illum

Flashaholic
Joined
Apr 29, 2006
Messages
13,053
Location
Central Florida, USA
Good advice here, I'll add a couple more


Drive with the windows up.
Try not to linger under 35mph for too long, neither for speeds over 75 [mainly for trucks and SUVs]
If possible, avoid driving behind anything that could cause wake turbulance
Accelerate slow, brake slow
Check your oil often, the books say 3000 miles... but I find that often a change is warranted around 2700 miles.
If you have to carry a payload, work it inside, avoid streamers or paints on the windows. I found a good clean/wax job helps with mileage too.
 
Last edited:
StarHalo

StarHalo

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 4, 2007
Messages
10,932
Location
California Republic
- buy a diesel car with manual tranny.

Diesel is the way to go for Interstate travel, but doesn't hold a candle to the hybrid in city cycle. As is usually concluded in these threads, diesel for long-distance commuting, hybrid for city commuting.

By a Kia Rio Ecodynamics.

None of the cars in this post are available in the US.

If possible, avoid driving behind anything that could cause wake turbulence

Getting a couple car lengths from a larger vehicle can dramatically increase MPG; I'm particularly fond of enclosed race trailers which sit low to the ground - even at very safe distances, getting behind one of these at any speed can add 10+ MPG..
 

Similar threads

magic79
Replies
7
Views
1K
snakebite
snakebite
B
Replies
26
Views
3K
beerwax
B
D
Replies
1
Views
842
K A
Groundhog66
Replies
31
Views
2K
jayhackett03
J
Top