Nightwalks with flashlight, stupid aggressive dogs (with owners). Advice?

iso400

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Thanks for the advices! I live in Norway and pepper/bear pray is not legal to carry (only legal to use by the police/military). Only some milder "self defence" sprays are legal I think. It is also not legal to carry pocket knives in public (not even small keychain ones). It is only allowed if you have a legitimate reason like hiking/camping/fishing etc.

But I guess very few of these aggressive dogs will actually attack and bite anyway, but its just not a pleasant experience. I actually like dogs (most of them anwyay) and its the stupid owners fault not the dogs. I just don't understand why they dont bother training their dog properly if they actually decide they want to break the law and walk the dog unleashed. They are responsible for their dogs actions after all. But many people are just lazy and ignorant.

I guess many of these dogs cant behave when walking with a leash anyway so Its just "easier" to let them run around freely.
 

P_A_S_1

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bearsign.jpg

'Fight a black bear' ..... :huh:
 

ForrestChump

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I like to take late walks when its dark and use my flashlights. The problem is that many of the areas I walk are also used by dog owners walking their dogs. And many of the dogs I encounter gets aggressive when its dark and they meet someone with a flashlight. And 99% of the dogs owners does not use a leash on their dogs even though its mandatory!

So there has been a numerous times dogs have started barking like mad and running straight for me with the dogs owners running behind and shouting at them. I haven't got bitten yet, but it has been a few close calls and its not a pleasant experience. And almost every time the dog owner comes up with a lame excuse "he's a nice dog, just like strangers at night blablabal). On time there was 3 dogs at once running and barking at me!

Anybody else having this problem? When this happens I remain calm, turn off my flashlight, and just keep walking slowly in a another direction trying to ignore the dog while waiting for the owner to come get the dog. Its tempting to start shining the light at the dogs at max.


That really upsets me. Just tell them you're a friendly human, you just don't like criminally negligent people or their maliciously trained & dangerous animals.
 
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Gravitron

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I've had many encounters with aggressive dogs on night walks. One night I discovered that a very bright flood-type beam(2,500+ lumens) works every time. I'm not sure why, but all I know is it works.
P.S. A bright light with good throw is ineffective.
 

bykfixer

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John 3:16
I gotta edit my post to say my wife is a dog trainer. She says the arms crossed and folded againt the chest, upward like hands near your chin is best. Someone else that here too. My wife says turn sideways so as not to appear to make eye contact with the dog as well. Like other said, the owner will be approaching shortly.

Now in my town, if pocket knives are out lawed, only outlaws have pocket knives.
Norway sounds like a criminals paradise. Unarmed citizens everywhere.
 

Lebkuecher

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WarRaven

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Instructions unclear.
Bleeding out...
Were gummie bears for dogs or to aide against blood loss by shoving into open holes?
 

moldyoldy

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once a long time ago in Northern Idaho in the Big Timber country near the Bitterroot Divide when I worked for the USFS a couple summers and falls. For any duty that meant working away from the ranger station, we often carried handguns, typically .357 level or above. a .22 rifle was back at camp for small game/grouse. Wild dogs, or worse, dog packs, were considered a serious menace to wildlife and people. Our standing orders were to shoot any dog if we could not see it's owner. Meaning the owner did not have control of the dog. No exceptions. We did not have to be threatened directly. There were a few cases where the USFS employee did shoot a dog running loose - no warning shots - and was taken to court by the dog owner. The judge threw out the case(s). Justice is swift in the back country.
 
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PartyPete

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Instructions unclear.
Bleeding out...
Were gummie bears for dogs or to aide against blood loss by shoving into open holes?
Dogs can smell fear, but also high fructose corn syrup, which stops them dead in their tracks...

Oh, who am I kidding. I carry Cold Steel Inferno spray and usually a S&W Shield. [emoji12]
 

recDNA

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I can't believe people are afraid of dogs that aren't trained to attack
 

iso400

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I can't believe people are afraid of dogs that aren't trained to attack

Uh? What does being scared for dogs have anything to do with it? I'm not afraid of dogs, but that doesn't mean that I like and should accept to be bitten by one because the owners doesn't have control over their dogs.
 

yoyoman

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I think we've gotten a little off track. As some of us said early in this thread, these dogs have not earned the privilege of being off leash. Shame on the owners.

We spent a long weekend in Zermatt, a village below the Matterhorn. Cars are not allowed - you take a train from the town below. Took an early morning walk with my dog. She has earned the privilege of walking off leash. Didn't even pause to smell the freshly baked bread when we passed the bakery. When we got to the train station, a policeman started yelling at me in German. I don't speak German, but I know what halt means and I stopped. Told him that I don't speak German and he switched to English. "Is that your dog?" I looked around and then down - my dog had stopped and was sitting right next to me. So I said yes. "Leash!" I put the leash on and went on my way. No problem because my dog doesn't pull on the leash. The policeman followed us for 1/2 hour to make sure I didn't take the leash off. Got bored and went back to the hotel to see if the rest of the family was up yet.

The point is that dogs that haven't earned the right to walk off leash should be kept on a leash so they are not a menace or annoyance to others. And I bet these owners let their dogs off leash because they probably haven't even trained their dogs to walk on a leash without pulling. Again, shame on the owners.

My (current) dog is a Miniature Australian Shepherd. Definitely not a scary looking dog (there are some pictures of her in the Pooch thread) and she has a kind and gentle disposition. But she had to be trained and had to earn the privilege of walking off leash.

Edit: so you don't think I'm the dog whisperer or anything.

Our first family dog was a Vizsla, a utility bird dog (points, flushes, retrieves). A great family dog - gentle, always wanted to be us, etc. But a very high prey drive and more than energetic. She didn't earn the privilege of being off leash in the neighborhood and was even tough on a leash. If she saw a rabbit, chipmunk or bird, she would pull and try to take off. Ended up getting one of those things that attaches the leash under the nose. I used to take her into the woods with my friend and his well trained Lab. My dog would see a rabbit or something and would take off. But she was allowed off leash because she knew people weren't prey. If we came across other people, she ignored them and stayed with us (and on the lookout for real prey).
 
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Perhaps a cattle prod might be of use, first for the charging, aggressive dog, then for its negligent "master". You could give Fido an audio/visual warning display of what your magic stick can do, if Fido persists with his aggressive behavior, light em up!

You shouldn't have to stand still just waiting to see what happens.

~ Chance

Waps and Bee killer, which I'm assuming is legal where op lives, works well also.
 
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recDNA

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Why?! Are you of the opinion that no person, throughout history, has ever been bit/attacked by a dog that lacked formal training? :lolsign:

~ Chance
People have been attacked by raccoons too but I am not terrified of pet dogs nor wild raccoons. As a teenager I worked as a veterinary assistant and I was bitten a few times but I'm not afraid of pet dogs with owners biting me. Now a snarling feral dog in an entirely different matter.

A cattle prod for the owner would be more understandable than hurting the poor dog...and then of course a prison term.
 
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recDNA

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Uh? What does being scared for dogs have anything to do with it? I'm not afraid of dogs, but that doesn't mean that I like and should accept to be bitten by one because the owners doesn't have control over their dogs.
I'm saying it is unlikely the dog will actually bite you unless you try to kick him or something. Sure it is possible but a car might veer off the road and hit you too.

You would be smart to stop running or even walking though.

My key point is hurting a dog that hasn't actually bitten you isn't called for.
 
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