Normal operation?

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Shandstech

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Hey guys, just wondering if this is normal operation for my Haiku. If I lightly press the switch on high mode, then fully press from there (not letting go from the light press) it switches to low. This doesn't happen every time but it does happen quite frequently. This is a pretty new light and I am using black protected AW rcr's.
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hombreluhrs

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I have a mule that was just purchased from Don that was acting similar to what yours is doing, but I was using a primary cr123. It was a 2.89V surefire cell. Since I've replaced it with a protected AW rcr123 I haven't had it happen yet. Also tried a fresh batterystation cr123 and it worked with no problems.

Someone that knows better than me will hopefully chime in soon. Or you can always just ask Don.
 

Shandstech

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Thank you Hombreluhrs! I just verified voltage at 4.171 4.185 and 4.192. The other 2 batteries are on the charger now. Cleaned contacts, adjusted switch, still does it. Might order a switch to see if that solves the problem.
 

archimedes

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Mode switching occurs with a very short "off" time .... My guess would be that something in the switch is causing the contact to break the circuit very briefly.

Replacing the McClicky should not cost much, and may well fix the problem.

By the way - irregularities in mode switching are a known occurrence at low voltages with this driver, but you appear to have verified adequate battery voltage with your DMM
 
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Shandstech

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Mode switching occurs with a very short "off" time .... My guess would be that something in the switch is causing the contact to break the circuit very briefly.

Replacing the McClicky should not cost much, and may well fix the problem.

By the way - irregularities in mode switching are a known occurrence at low voltages with this driver, but you appear to have verified adequate battery voltage with your DMM

thanks for the response. That is what I am hoping. 10 bucks and I should good to go.
 

McGizmo

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It could definitely be something in the switch that is interrupting the circuit and causing a shift in level. Make sure the switch is snugged down tight in the battery pak before you go to the trouble of replacing it though. It is possible to take the switch apart and you might be able to find out what is amiss. You can pry the two main plastic components apart with a small flat blade screw driver or similar tool and then press them back together again after sorting out the inner workings.
 

Shandstech

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It could definitely be something in the switch that is interrupting the circuit and causing a shift in level. Make sure the switch is snugged down tight in the battery pak before you go to the trouble of replacing it though. It is possible to take the switch apart and you might be able to find out what is amiss. You can pry the two main plastic components apart with a small flat blade screw driver or similar tool and then press them back together again after sorting out the inner workings.

Thanks for the reply Don, I figured the switch was serviceable but didn't want to break it without another one on hand. I did a simple continuity test on the switch and it did indeed seem to be breaking contact between the half press and full press. I work in an electronics field so I felt confident that I could take the switch apart and find the problem. Well.....I took the switch completely apart, cleaned everything and put it back together. I made sure everything was tight, put the switch back into the light and low and behold it works flawlessly now. However, I still don't know what caused it. Anyhow, it's fixed now and that's all that matters. Thank you guys for your replies and help. I might post pictures of the process to take the switch apart but don't know if that's acceptable. I don't want others to break their switches in an attempt to fix them just because they see pictures of it.
 

McGizmo

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Sandstech,
Cool! Glad you got it sorted out. Feel free to share whatever you like on the forum, that's what it's about. I once considered posting a how to on disassemble of the switch but figured coming from me it might send the wrong message; problematic switch, something that a user would need to understand or maintain, etc. There are tens of thousands of these switches out there now and issues with them have been so infrequent that they are for the most part, a non issue. At least that is my impression. When these switches were designed and developed, their task was a simple one of providing momentary or constant on function. The added task of providing an instant open or closed circuit with no bounce or skip came much later. Fortunately they have proven to be for the most part, up to such a task.
 

eala

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OMG, I had no idea these switches were user serviceable. Two weeks ago, my Haiku switch started acting up. Only by sheer laziness, I had not emailed Don. Instead, I started using other lights.

Just now, after reading this thread, I ran downstairs, ripped the switch apart, cleaned it up, popped it back together and we are back in business.

Further proof that the Haiku is the last light you will ever need.

eala
 

Shandstech

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Sandstech,
Cool! Glad you got it sorted out. Feel free to share whatever you like on the forum, that's what it's about. I once considered posting a how to on disassemble of the switch but figured coming from me it might send the wrong message; problematic switch, something that a user would need to understand or maintain, etc. There are tens of thousands of these switches out there now and issues with them have been so infrequent that they are for the most part, a non issue. At least that is my impression. When these switches were designed and developed, their task was a simple one of providing momentary or constant on function. The added task of providing an instant open or closed circuit with no bounce or skip came much later. Fortunately they have proven to be for the most part, up to such a task.

I agree, I've been using these switches for years and have never had any issues whatsoever. I'll post pictures of the disassembly process for those who would find it useful.

Eala, glad you got yours working!
 

erehwyrevekool

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Can't wait for pics! Thanks!
I have a Gen 1 McClicky (the one w/o the two holes) switch who does not work anymore, hope I can fix it with your tips!
 

McGizmo

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Don,

Does Deoxit help in these switch cleaning procedures?
I have no experience cleaning them but would think that any method that is good for cleaning contacts would work here as well. I don't consider the switch an item that requires any maintenance schedule but if it should misbehave, it can certainly be broken down and inspected for probable cause. The real Achilles heal regarding the switch is its original design intents not being followed in current applications. In addition to now requiring solid open and closed status with no bounce, the other weakness is in its need to be very snugly seated into the battery pak to insure a good ground path. The switch was designed originally to go in a tail cap where you tightened the tail cap against the battery tube insuring a solid contact and loosening of the cap for lock out.
 

Shandstech

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Switch disassembly:

remove o-ring and boot:
remove switch from tail of light with snap ring pliers or similar:

Using something small, a flat head screwdriver here, gently pry these metal tabs away from plastic. Be careful not to pry too much as it only takes a little bit of movement to release these tabs from the switch assembly. This clip is what holds the spring in place. Note the orientation of the spring as it will need to go back in the same way.


This is what you are left with. The last coil on the bottom of the spring that has the nipple sticking out, will need to be on the metal tab at the bottom of the switch in this picture when re-assembling. More on that later.

Next, go around the edges with something small and flat and pry the two pieces in half making sure not to pry too much on one side at a time or the prongs holding it together might break.



Once they are all the way apart, you will be left with this. Be careful as there is a small spring in there you don't want to lose.

From there you can pry the metal ring off of the plastic and you'll be left with this.

Once the large ring is removed the small ring that is attached to a rod that goes into the actual button just slides out. It will have lubricant on the inside, mine seemed to have an excessive amount so I cleaned some of it off.

at this point I cleaned everything with CRC electrical grade contact cleaner.

after that, reassemble in reverse. Note that the large coil on the bottom of the spring with the nipple coming off is on top of the metal contact.

Other side

then put the spring retaining clip back on and crimp it back into place using needle nose pliers.

Put boot and O-ring back on and you should be good to go.

I hope this helps some of you guys out there. Message me if you have any questions.
Travis
 
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