oil in small engine

Poppy

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We're so goofy, from a small lawnmower engine burning a bit of oil, to Top Fuel jobberoos.
View attachment 17108

Caught myself watching a NHRA competing a while back,
the superchargers used to make the 11,000hp use 2,000hp in the process to do that.

Wrap your head around that one...
Yeah, its funny how conversations go. Sometimes the topic changes so quickly, I find while politely waiting my turn to speak on a topic, it changes, and it would be odd to put my two cents in on the earlier topic.
 

bykfixer

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Pound for pound the small engine is like an ant carrying a 2x4.

Back in the late 1980's in my town a Nichols department store had closed. The parking lot was like 50 acres. It became a place where dad's taught their kids to drive. Then the go kart showed up. At first it was a guy having fun with his kid. Before long you had a bunch of Richard Petty vs Daryl Waltrip action taking place every Sunday.
Dad's would put 3hp gears on 5hp engines to give their kid an advantage. Stuff like that. Then came the ambulance calls and that was that, but man some of those lawnmower type engine powered carts could really zoom.

I suppose those character knew not to screw in the cap to check the oil level……
 
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Chauncey Gardiner

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Yeah, its funny how conversations go. Sometimes the topic changes so quickly, I find while politely waiting my turn to speak on a topic, it changes, and it would be odd to put my two cents in on the earlier topic.

Don't be silly. That's what the reply option is for. Keeps you post current, or at least on topic. ^ See how I did that?
 

Poppy

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Sorry, I should have clarified, I was speaking to conversations in person, not online.
Yes, you are right, about "online" conversations... I used the "Reply" option to skip over raggie's post about going electric.
Thanks :)
 
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bykfixer

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I'm just happy to see you asked CPF members how to properly check the oil of a lawnmower instead of asking your cellular phone or an orb named Hal sitting on the dining room table.
 

Chauncey Gardiner

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Sorry, I should have clarified, I was speaking to conversations in person, not online.
Yes, you are right, about "online" conversations... I used the "Reply" option to skip over raggie's post about going electric.
Thanks :)

Just as easy, but when in a conversation, preface your late reply with - "You previously mentioned ------, I'd like to circle back to that."
 

Chauncey Gardiner

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I'm just happy to see you asked CPF members how to properly check the oil of a lawnmower instead of asking your cellular phone or an orb named Hal sitting on the dining room table.

I'm pretty sure I have or once had a small engine that had instructions to screw the dipstick all the way in when checking the oil.
 

Poppy

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Not assuming is a good tactic
Yes, I learned a long time ago, that it is generally a good idea to READ assembly instructions. One time I bought my wife a fairly rigid plastic bird cage. One that had multiple pieces that snapped together. The instructions gave a step by step procedure. Yet... looking at the picture seemed like it was very straightforward. Wrong! :awman: I snapped a piece in place, only to discover that I needed to remove it so that another piece could be snapped in first.

Boy, was I concerned that I was going to break it trying to remove the piece that I put in place out of order. Luckily I was able to get it apart. whew. :giggle:
 

Chauncey Gardiner

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Yes, I learned a long time ago, that it is generally a good idea to READ assembly instructions. One time I bought my wife a fairly rigid plastic bird cage. One that had multiple pieces that snapped together. The instructions gave a step by step procedure. Yet... looking at the picture seemed like it was very straightforward. Wrong! :awman: I snapped a piece in place, only to discover that I needed to remove it so that another piece could be snapped in first.

Boy, was I concerned that I was going to break it trying to remove the piece that I put in place out of order. Luckily I was able to get it apart. whew. :giggle:

Also worth noting - If the instructions "say" to read all of the steps before starting, read all the steps before starting. One of the many lessons I've learned the hard way.
 
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bykfixer

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So, anyone here purchase one of those - never needs an oil-change lawn mower? They're something I can't get my mind wrapped around.
Briggs & Stratton say better air filtration and more precise machinery allow the oil to stay cleaner. But, to me the heating and cooling could add condensation to the oil so I'd still change it every other year at most. It's pretty easy on most pushmowers.
 

Poppy

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I searched for a five year review and didn't find one. There was a lot of talk about them in 2015. Some of the talk goes in line with what my initial thoughts are.
1. a lot of people don't change the oil yearly, myself included ( I could mow my lawn in 30 minutes once a week for 16 weeks, so that is 8 hours a year). With oil changes every 100 hours, that would be once every 12 years!
2. The body of my last lawn mower started to rot out in the same time period.
3. in today's disposal economy, the engine might outlast the other components.
4. overall it may just be a marketing strategy.

I noted that they do make different quality engines, (just as honda does) some with cast iron cylinder sleeves, and some have aluminum blocks.
 

orbital

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...

I noted that they do make different quality engines, (just as honda does) some with cast iron cylinder sleeves, and some have aluminum blocks.
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The first time saw laser hardening of cast iron cylinder sleeves, thought it was the trickest thing.
There's always a difference in manufacturing quality,, details matter.
 
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