OLD flashlight...

TigerhawkT3

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
3,817
Location
CA, 94087
My boss (although not much of one, he is a bit of a flashaholic, having a Thor 10MCP in his car) at where I just started work handed me a flashlight the other day and said I could keep it. He mentioned that it was "one of the originals," whatever that meant. Using a coin to pop open the case, this is what I found:



It seems to consist of two AAA alks and a small incan bulb. The switch is the lump on the top left, with the triangle poking into the light. When the lump is pushed forward, the triangle pushes the strip of metal into the side of the bulb assy.

As you can see, this thing is ancient and scarred with years of neglect. The batts have leaked, leaving white residue all over the light. There is a very slight possibility that, once cleaned up and new batts inserted, this light might function. To me, though, it's not worth the effort. It simply serves as an example of what happens when a good flashlight goes bad... or, more accurately, when a bad flashlight goes worse.

Unfortunately, this light is representative of the quality of the other lights at my workplace. Every room is required to have a working flashlight close at hand in case of power outages, but only about 10% of them do, and half of the lights don't even work. They're those cheap plastic lights from department stores, such as the Eveready Economy Bright Light. The batteries, however, are usually mismatched or less than fresh, resulting in little or no light. I've tried to get the higher-ups to fix the problem, but the general response has been "tough."

Oh well.
 

rwolff

Enlightened
Joined
Dec 22, 2004
Messages
224
Location
Ontario, CA
Every room is required to have a working flashlight close at hand in case of power outages, but only about 10% of them do, and half of the lights don't even work.

The obvious solution is for you to be assigned a work station in one of the rooms without a (company-supplied) working flashlight. So long as you're at your work station, that room's sure to have the best flashlight on the premises. :crackup:

I believe the LED "shake lights" have even started turning up in dollar stores, and a convenience store near where I live has LED "squeeze" (generator) lights at 3 bucks each - if you can find a local source for maintenance-free lights like these (i.e. no batteries to get stale and need replacing) at a decent price, it might be something to suggest to management. They're not the greatest, but they're better than nothing (which is what you're dealing with at present).
 

TigerhawkT3

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 2, 2006
Messages
3,817
Location
CA, 94087
Those are some pretty cool ideas, especially the suggestion about the shake-lights. Zero maintenance would be pretty nice.

Unfortunately, that isn't the entire problem. Apparently, management had just redistributed flashlights to every room about a month earlier. They were surprised to hear that the lights were gone - lifted, most likely.

Management seems to think that a functioning emergency flashlight isn't worth the trouble (i.e. money) of finding good lights, thinking of a way of keeping them secure, and making sure they work.

It's possible - not likely, but possible - that they'll wise up to the importance of light after the next power outage.
 
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