Old stuff that works makes me happy - how about you?

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,555
Location
Dust in the Wind
About 20 years ago I bought a slow cooker to make soups and stews when I lived alone and money was tight. Cook up a batch of chicken noodle soup for example, eat from the fresh batch and freeze the rest. Thaw a pint, heat and serve later. I moved around for a while and with each move my load got lighter and lighter to the point that everything I owned fit in a compact pickup with room for a passenger.

That crock pot and my hamster (RIP) went with me each time. Last night I did my first slow cooked brisket in old faithful and this morning the annual Christmas Eve butter beans are going. The idea with the brisket was to have a grandma's pot roast flavored meat so garlic cloves and onion soup mix were added to a quart of water and the meat slow cooked over night. The remaining broth is simmering around a pound of fresh picked, quick frozen baby lima beans this year instead of usual ham-hocks and enough butter to clog a fire hose.

If ole Betty Crocker gives out today it was certainly a good investment back around the time when Y2K was supposed to end it all. I had started a batch of venicine shoulder chilli in it the New Years Eve all that was supposed to take place so that in case there was a tomorrow I'd have some mighty tastey food the next evening.
 

LeanBurn

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 3, 2010
Messages
1,355
Location
Alberta
Some old stuff works great.
1992 Toro lawn mower
1984 Honda snowblower
1946 Gillette Tech razor

The good stuff always lasts...and I'll keep using them
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,555
Location
Dust in the Wind
I'm thinking my Trac II razor goes back to the late 80's? Early 90's? As long as they make refills I'll keep using that one. I buy a few 5 packs at a time in case they do stop making them someday.
 

simonsays

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Mar 20, 2006
Messages
141
Location
Sunderland United Kingdom
I'm thinking my Trac II razor goes back to the late 80's? Early 90's? As long as they make refills I'll keep using that one. I buy a few 5 packs at a time in case they do stop making them someday.
I still shave occasionally with my granddad's DE razor that he carried in WW2. Nearly 80 years old and still going strong

Sent from my Redmi Note 9 Pro using Tapatalk
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,555
Location
Dust in the Wind
My dad had a blade sharpener for those things simon. It was an ingenious device where you stuck the blade in a slot, closed the lid and cranked a handle. The rotation of the handle caused a series of cogs and worm gears to scrape the blade against a rubbing stone and every other turn FLIPPED THE BLADE over. Apparently in the field where supplies ran short it was about as valuable as a pack of Lucky Strikes.
Now you know those fellows had honor. You're hunkered down in the frozen woods somewhere in Germany with bullets whizzing past, you haven't eaten non canned rations in weeks, no gloves, no snow boots and yet you're still clean shaved everyday? Like that would fly today? Yeah right.

Anyway, when he passed away it was not with his shave kit anymore so we don't know what became of it. He grew a beard late in life so we don't know what even happened to his entire shave kit except for the 50 something cans of Barbasol shaving foam he had bought on clearance for like 19 cents a can or something.

I still use the knife sharpener stone that was his grandfathers. One day he pulled out the little two blade knife that was his grandfathers and began sharpening the larger of the two blades that had been sharpened so many times about 10% was missing. He showed me how to properly use it then said "here, take both home with you"… what an honor that was. i gave the knife to my nephew who my dad thought the world of.
 
Last edited:

scout24

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 23, 2008
Messages
8,869
Location
Penn's Woods
Byk- Merry Christmas, first off! I have a photo of my deuce-and-a-half co-pilot shaving out of a canteen cup at about 5am as the sun was coming up on the side of the highway between Bagdhad and Basra in Iraq after a 28 hour cross country push north on day two of Desert Storm in 1991. It had been quite a night, but standards were standards. 30 years ago here in a few weeks, but us whippersnappers kept up appearances when we (literally) had five minutes. I'll dig the photo out later today and post it. :)

Edit- I'm thinking your nephew treasures both the touchstones to his Great-Grandfather as well as the memory of you gifting them to him.

Best I can do with the pic...
 
Last edited:

wweiss

Enlightened
Joined
Feb 3, 2017
Messages
702
Location
Weston, CT
My dad had a blade sharpener for those things simon. It was an ingenious device where you stuck the blade in a slot, closed the lid and cranked a handle. The rotation of the handle caused a series of cogs and worm gears to scrape the blade against a rubbing stone and every other turn FLIPPED THE BLADE over. Apparently in the field where supplies ran short it was about as valuable as a pack of Lucky Strikes.
Now you know those fellows had honor. You're hunkered down in the frozen woods somewhere in Germany with bullets whizzing past, you haven't eaten non canned rations in weeks, no gloves, no snow boots and yet you're still clean shaved everyday? Like that would fly today? Yeah right.

Anyway, when he passed away it was not with his shave kit anymore so we don't know what became of it. He grew a beard late in life so we don't know what even happened to his entire shave kit except for the 50 something cans of Barbasol shaving foam he had bought on clearance for like 19 cents a can or something.

I still use the knife sharpener stone that was his grandfathers. One day he pulled out the little two blade knife that was his grandfathers and began sharpening the larger of the two blades that had been sharpened so many times about 10% was missing. He showed me how to properly use it then said "here, take both home with you"… what an honor that was. i gave the knife to my nephew who my dad thought the world of.

Great narrative - hope you find that kit some day...
 

Celest

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 9, 2020
Messages
37
Location
New Mexico, USA
TI-84+ SE (purchased December 2009 when I was 9 years old), the first ever purchase I made as a kid with allowance money.
Works like a charm.

 

Katherine Alicia

Enlightened
Joined
May 15, 2020
Messages
836
Location
Central UK.
maybe a little trite for this place but I really dig my new P60, it`s simple, no-nonsense and just works (really well), defo my fave flashlight purchase for a long while. :)
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,555
Location
Dust in the Wind
Time for an E………
You think a P60 is cool, wait until you try an incan E light. Check out what Lumens Factory has to offer. You'll be amazed at how much light comes from such a small package.
 

orbital

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Messages
4,339
Location
WI
..I really dig my new P60, it`s simple, no-nonsense and just works (really well), defo my fave flashlight purchase for a long while. :)

+

Now that you're in your early 20s', you have lots of time to see P60 setups are timeless.
 

desert.snake

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
2,081
Location
Eastern Europe
I'm a fan of audio, but only the headphone part, here headphones beyedynamic DT48 post-war, earpads have been replacedjudging by the serial numbers on the cups, they were released around 1950, work and sound great. Recently, they lost sound in the left channel, I disassembled them, it turned out that one screw on the terminal block was loosened and now they work again despite the decomposition spots on the inner side of the membrane.

Tomorrow I will show my main pen for diary entries, I have been using it since 2013, but it was made in 1918. I had several pens from 1904-05, but they flowed through a couple of cracks in ebonite and I gave them to a friend who is engaged in repairs and now they are like new.
















 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,439
Location
Northern New Jersey
My Dad had five kids, three of us boys, and for a while a 3 HP single stage snow blower that didn't have a reverse. Sometimes it was less work to use a shovel, than it was to horse that thing around.

In 1986 I bought my second house and it had a 106 foot driveway. plus 10 feet of apron, (and when it snowed) two lanes of road that would get plowed into the apron area. Our first snow storm was about 18 inches deep, and fortunately I was able to borrow my mechanic's international with a plow.

I looked in the want ads for a snow blower. I found a 7 HP Simplicity, for sale, crazy cheap; something like $175. The guy inherited the house, and sold it. He was moving to Arizona and the buyer didn't want the blower. I asked 2 questions. Does it run? Does it have speeds, with a reverse?

I bought it sight unseen, and picked it up later that day.

At the time it was 17 years old.

It had/has two speeds. Slow, and slower yet, but by today's standards, it was built like a tank. About 30 years later, all the while living outdoors, when I sold that house, I gave it to a friend. It's now 47 years old, and runs every year. It's funny how one may get a sense of pride in having and using something that is old and reliable, despite having nothing to do with the manufacture of the product.
 

jabe1

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
3,116
Location
Cleveland,Oh
I have a few older things that continue to work really well despite their age.
My Victorinox pioneer with brass liner that I bought sometime in the early 80s. I have carried this knife at least once a week since it was new. The blade doesn't snap back quite as well as it did, but it's close! I keep it "sharp enough" I don't want to work on the edge too much.
I also have a cast iron Dutch oven that my mother bought at a garage sale in the mid sixties, it was pretty old and well used already then. I can make a mean chili or pot roast in it.
Up until just a few years ago, my go to circular saw was an Porter Cable 146a from the 50s. My grandfather bought in to build a new garage, and it was handed down to me. Works like a champ still.
 

Poppy

Flashaholic
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
8,439
Location
Northern New Jersey
I have a few older things that continue to work really well despite their age.
My Victorinox pioneer with brass liner that I bought sometime in the early 80s. I have carried this knife at least once a week since it was new. The blade doesn't snap back quite as well as it did, but it's close! I keep it "sharp enough" I don't want to work on the edge too much.
I also have a cast iron Dutch oven that my mother bought at a garage sale in the mid sixties, it was pretty old and well used already then. I can make a mean chili or pot roast in it.
Up until just a few years ago, my go to circular saw was an Porter Cable 146a from the 50s. My grandfather bought in to build a new garage, and it was handed down to me. Works like a champ still.
Son of a gun, I just loaned my Black and Decker circular saw to my son a couple of weeks ago. I hadn't thought of it as "Old Reliable" - just - my circular saw. I bought it in the mid seventies, so it is only about 45 years old.

I borrowed a Porter Cable right angle drill when I ran new electric at my first house. It was big and heavy, all metal, and worked like a champ! That was 1980, and God only knows how old it was when I borrowed it. I'd be willing to bet that it is still working today.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top