One is none

Hooked on Fenix

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Dec 13, 2007
Messages
2,955
A bivy bag (bivouac sack) is basically a water resistant sleeping bag cover. Some are more elaborate with a pole, headroom, and mosquito netting to be used like a single person tent. A bothy bag is also known as a mountain hut. It’s a bag that you get inside and sit on the sides (has no floor other than the piece you sit on) and use your bodies for poles (it may also allow use of trekking poles in center for added supports). They start at 2 person and go up to 12+ person sizes. I carry a 4-6 person Rab shelter which weighs 22 ounces. I’ve found ways to use it for a single person shelter in bad weather. I got that size because it is large enough for one person to lay down in. If you’re in a situation where you need one, most likely someone is injured or exhausted and needs to lay down and sleep. 4-6 person is also a good size for a small group or family hiking. And don’t confuse either a bivy bag or a bothy bag with a biffy bag. The owner will not appreciate it.
Let me simplify this further. One you sleep in (bivy bag), one you sit in (bothy bag), and one you 💩 in (biffy bag).
 

Burgess

Flashaholic
Joined
Apr 10, 2006
Messages
6,460
Location
USA
Keep in mind, it was 1982.
Flashlights had an incandescent bulb.
Which could BURN OUT at any time,
and were often Very sensitive to shock,
like dropping yer' flashlight . . . . .
:eek:
At BEST, your flashlight has a spare bulb
located in the tailcap or head.
Or you may have carried a spare
in your pocket or backpack.

Challenging to change a bulb in Total Darkness.
Don't *DROP* anything !
😱
_
 

Monocrom

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Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
17,187
Location
NYC
There were probably some individuals back in the day who thought the Streamlight Scorpion was a better light than the SureFire 6P, if for no other reason than the Scorpion came supplied with a spare inca. bulb.
 

Hooked on Fenix

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
2,955
We always dug latrines.. My only time using a bag was for a mean tempered neighbor 🙄
When doing any backpacking in the Sierra Nevadas, they don’t let you dig a latrine and leave it behind. They make you pack it out. Mt. Whitney is now littered with used wag bags from people too lazy to carry it back. Plus sometimes those bags leak. They leave it for the rangers to take out their trash. Poop patrol is a full time job. A biffy bag is a step up from a wag bag. You don’t have to dig a hole. It’s basically a foldable toilet. Just don’t lose your balance when you squat.
 

DaveTheDude

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Oct 26, 2009
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595
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Columbus, Ohio
OK, my turn. I live in suburbia, but solo hike and backpack in woodland areas that are typically a minimum of one days hike back to civilization and often more, which means that if I get into trouble, it's either self-rescue or no rescue. (More on this in a bit.)

In town I typically carry three lights, with backup lights and spare cells in the car (I consider forehandedness a cardinal virtue.) In winter I like my FourSevens Quark 2x123, with a 16650 cell; an EagTac D25C Ti (modded by SkyLumen with a high CRI emitter and a boost driver...800 lumens on Turbo); and one of several AA/14500 lights, in case of utter chaos, in which case AA cells may be the most easily scavenged.

In warm months I opt for lightweight lighting tools, most often a FourSevens Mini 123, and a AA/14500. (Backups still in the car.)

Backpacking is another matter. As I wrote, I hike alone. Two headlamps (18650), two flashlights (18650), one Luci inflatable 4000 mAh lantern, and one AA/14500, and one AAA, both of these as insurance against the remote chance that my other lights might fail and I need to beg another hiker for a spare cell. (I've only encountered two other hikers on trail who use 18650 cells in their lights...most are content with AA/AAA powered lights, or internal rechargable cells.)

Recently my wife has become more anxious about my solo adventures... she's not amused by tales of narrow misses or disasters averted, and now insists that a buy a satellite communication enabled rescue beacon before going off grid (established campgrounds are OK with her, but hikes in the Sierra Nevada, not do much.) Even though I may now may be able to summon help via satellite, I still need to survive until help arrives, in which case the multiple redundant lights are still "essential kit."
 

Jean-Luc Descarte

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Jul 29, 2020
Messages
573
Location
Where the sun sets fast
Just saw a short YouTube video clip of a hapless hiker who thought he'd explore the Cave of the Domes at Grand Canyon, in 1982. He dropped and broke his *only* flashlight and sp ent two days in total darkness unable to find his way out. Park rangers figured out where he must have gone and found him in seconds after entering the cave...he was only 50 metres from the entrance. The video clip can be found on YouTube if you search for "The Shortest Search and Rescue".

I thought "flashlight" was inherently a plural noun....

I carry more than one light taking the trash to the curb. Let alone going someplace where a light would be essential to finding my way back out. Mind you, in 1982, flashlights were a lot crappier than they are today.

Bill
Here's the clip, for reference:



EDIT: Just saw that Burgess linked to it in the previous page too.
 
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rwolfenstein

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
168
Much to my typical disappointment with streamlight, my issued work light stinger failed today. However, my venerable surefire 6P defender continues trucking on the same way it had when I was 18 (almost 2 decades ago).
 

Stress_Test

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 18, 2008
Messages
1,118
Much to my typical disappointment with streamlight, my issued work light stinger failed today. However, my venerable surefire 6P defender continues trucking on the same way it had when I was 18 (almost 2 decades ago).

You know, it seems like I keep seeing a lot of incidents of Streamlight failure lately. I thought they were supposed to be a pretty solid brand, but maybe the company is going through a bad spell and having QC problems and so forth.
 

rwolfenstein

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Mar 29, 2017
Messages
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You know, it seems like I keep seeing a lot of incidents of Streamlight failure lately. I thought they were supposed to be a pretty solid brand, but maybe the company is going through a bad spell and having QC problems and so forth.
Well lucky for me, I have no shortage of flashlights. I will just go back to my old trusty magcharger with an led upgrade. I don't believe streamlight has ever had decent quality, but I personally have never had luck with their led stingers. Only reason why I use one at work is because that's all my agency buys unfortunately .
 

Poppy

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Dec 20, 2012
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Northern New Jersey
I do like the completely smooth flood "mule" type of light from my cell phone emitter. It made me wish I had bought one of those little 4-sevens Atom lights back in the day. However, the ol' Scotch tape on the lens trick gets pretty close on some lights.

I will say that I wouldn't want to burn down my phone battery by using the flashlight function. If you've ever had to use your phone in an emergency situation, then you'll know how critical it is to have enough battery for communication, especially depending on the duration of the event.
I can't get my daughter or grandkids to carry a light, but they are each attached to their phone. My daughter has a few lights in her car, that's the best I can do.

It is my understanding that the cell phone light is not a big drain on the battery. But I have seen it drop charge status do to its use as a phone.

When they are going to be out for the day, or more, I encourage them to bring a battery power bank, charger, and charging cable. They'll often agree to this.
 

rwolfenstein

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Mar 29, 2017
Messages
168
I can't get my daughter or grandkids to carry a light, but they are each attached to their phone. My daughter has a few lights in her car, that's the best I can do.

It is my understanding that the cell phone light is not a big drain on the battery. But I have seen it drop charge status do to its use as a phone.

When they are going to be out for the day, or more, I encourage them to bring a battery power bank, charger, and charging cable. They'll often agree to this.
My fiance doesn't believe in decent lights. I think he had a AAA light that was picked up at the cash register of a local stop and rob in his car. I upgraded him by installing an Inova T4R in the car and put a mag tac rechargeable in the truck. Its all fine and dandy until you pop a tire or have a car issue and can't see what you are doing. I also added keychain lights because he always has his keys, so then he always has a light rather than his phone.
 

bykfixer

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My own little Idaho
My fiance doesn't believe in decent lights. I think he had a AAA light that was picked up at the cash register of a local stop and rob in his car. I upgraded him by installing an Inova T4R in the car and put a mag tac rechargeable in the truck. Its all fine and dandy until you pop a tire or have a car issue and can't see what you are doing. I also added keychain lights because he always has his keys, so then he always has a light rather than his phone.
Every year at Christmas I give the family a keychain light and tire pressure gauge. Each year they say "thanks I needed those".....simply put they lose them, probably before the new year.
 

rwolfenstein

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Mar 29, 2017
Messages
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Every year at Christmas I give the family a keychain light and tire pressure gauge. Each year they say "thanks I needed those".....simply put they lose them, probably before the new year.
That is an example of buying the simple cheapo lights like olights keychain lights. If you lose them, no biggy, they are always on sale.
 

Badbeams3

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Sep 28, 2000
Messages
4,388
I usually just have one light on me, besides my cell phone light. Either one of the cheap single mode AAA Olight or, as of late, the 2 mode Olight AA. But I would never go caving...or camping for that matter, without several lights.
 

Monocrom

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Aug 27, 2006
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NYC
You know, it seems like I keep seeing a lot of incidents of Streamlight failure lately. I thought they were supposed to be a pretty solid brand, but maybe the company is going through a bad spell and having QC problems and so forth.
To be honest, my experience with Streamlight has been the exact opposite over the years. Mine have been utterly reliable except for two models.

1- Streamlight Nano ~
Avoid at all costs. Whether carried on a carabiner outside a pocket or tucked into a pocket, the head loves to unscrew itself as you walk. Had mine on a carabiner with my house-keys. At work, at night, in the bathroom trailer. Reach down, and something felt off. "Off" being the key word. The head was missing. And of course, so were the button cell batteries. I was so angry! Unclipped it, tossed it in the garbage. The 1-inch lobster claw clip is honestly the best part of the light.

Next day, same trailer, someone found the head and apparently left it for me to find; on top of the hand-dryer.

2- Streamlight NightFighter (Incandescent version) ~
Horrendously awful design that was clearly meant to compete with the SureFire C2. Apparently no one actually put it in their hand before releasing it to the public. Grip-ring, huge, horribly uncomfortable. Clearly designed for some sort of space alien's hand because no human one could use it. And, bizarrely, came with a flush tailcap switch instead of a protruding one. Clip mounted on the ridiculously oversized grip-ring. Thus, making the clip useless. Tried adjusting the position of the grip-ring. Yeah, don't do that! Lost the tiny nut that held it in place. Couldn't find it! Ironically made the light better because without the grip-ring, the N.F. was the shortest 2xCR123 flashlight on the market at that time!

Actually had an opportunity to talk face-to-face with a Streamlight executive. Had heard that a new LED NightFighter was soon to be out. Expressed all of my concerns regarding the incandescent version. Told him I was looking forward to the new design LED version. He acted like he was genuinely interested in my feedback as a customer. Couple of months later, LED version is released. It's the same damn light! Only changes, uses an LED and has two rings on the bezel. Garbage design. Whoever created the N.F. not only deserves to be fired, but sued so the company can get back all of back-pay from him that they are clearly owed. Would honestly love to meet this incompetent moron so I could tell him off. He absolutely deserves it.

So, there you go. Two miserable failures out of over two dozen Streamlights I own. Both due to design flaws.
 

RWT1405

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 2, 2007
Messages
1,084
Location
PA
To be honest, my experience with Streamlight has been the exact opposite over the years. Mine have been utterly reliable except for two models.

1- Streamlight Nano ~
Avoid at all costs. Whether carried on a carabiner outside a pocket or tucked into a pocket, the head loves to unscrew itself as you walk. Had mine on a carabiner with my house-keys. At work, at night, in the bathroom trailer. Reach down, and something felt off. "Off" being the key word. The head was missing. And of course, so were the button cell batteries. I was so angry! Unclipped it, tossed it in the garbage. The 1-inch lobster claw clip is honestly the best part of the light.

Next day, same trailer, someone found the head and apparently left it for me to find; on top of the hand-dryer.

2- Streamlight NightFighter (Incandescent version) ~
Horrendously awful design that was clearly meant to compete with the SureFire C2. Apparently no one actually put it in their hand before releasing it to the public. Grip-ring, huge, horribly uncomfortable. Clearly designed for some sort of space alien's hand because no human one could use it. And, bizarrely, came with a flush tailcap switch instead of a protruding one. Clip mounted on the ridiculously oversized grip-ring. Thus, making the clip useless. Tried adjusting the position of the grip-ring. Yeah, don't do that! Lost the tiny nut that held it in place. Couldn't find it! Ironically made the light better because without the grip-ring, the N.F. was the shortest 2xCR123 flashlight on the market at that time!

Actually had an opportunity to talk face-to-face with a Streamlight executive. Had heard that a new LED NightFighter was soon to be out. Expressed all of my concerns regarding the incandescent version. Told him I was looking forward to the new design LED version. He acted like he was genuinely interested in my feedback as a customer. Couple of months later, LED version is released. It's the same damn light! Only changes, uses an LED and has two rings on the bezel. Garbage design. Whoever created the N.F. not only deserves to be fired, but sued so the company can get back all of back-pay from him that they are clearly owed. Would honestly love to meet this incompetent moron so I could tell him off. He absolutely deserves it.

So, there you go. Two miserable failures out of over two dozen Streamlights I own. Both due to design flaws.

+1

My experience with Streamlight has also been excellent for many, many years

I bought my first SL-20 in 1985, and have bought numerous other Streamlights over the decades and I will continue to use them, and recommend them
 

340pd

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Joined
Dec 8, 2012
Messages
131
Right after 9/11 in many of the interviews with survivors, the common response was," I wish I had a flashlight with me". Eye opener.

I bought a few brass AAA Maratac's. I keep one on a ring with a small Swiss Army knife along with a spare battery in the watch pocket of my jeans. It is used more than once daily. I made sure every family member has one with lithium batteries installed.
My bedside incan 6p got a Malkoff dropin and I keep two AA Quarks in each vehicle and have four other Malkoffs around the house for walks etc.
A drawer full of rechargeables and a solid supply of lithium spares and I am good to go.

Two carry knives used daily are for another thread.
Guns for a different forum.
 
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