P60 questions

mattw

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I just picked up a pair of 502B's, to try a few basic mods. But, before I do any... I would like to find a p60 dropin that is strong, will run off 2x CR123A'S and is a good neutral white. I do not need flash modes, but would like L,M,H with mode memory. I am planning on keeping one for a winter truck light to run off of CR123A's since we get quite cold here.

I do not understand bins, cri's and the other lingo. I am a network specialist and have worked in electronics on and off for years.

Thanks for your input![emoji6]
 
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mattw

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Darn auto correct. Should say CRI, not critical. Fixed first post, now that I am on a computer. Appears that I cannot delete this one.
 
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Timothybil

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Lumens Factory sells a very nice D26 (the Surefire P60 is a D26 lamp assemly) LED drop in. Modes of 5%/30%/100% with a 400 lumen output on high. One can order it in either Neutral White or 90+ CRI, which gives improved color rendition. I have a couple I am using in a G2 and a 6P in place of the original incan lamps, and I love them.
 

Timothybil

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I do not understand bins, cri's and the other lingo. I am a network specialist and have worked in electronics on and off for years.

Thanks for your input![emoji6]
I'm bored tonight so I will take a swing at it. This is from Wikipedia:

A color rendering index (CRI) is a quantitative measure of the ability of a light source to reveal the colors of various objects faithfully in comparison with an ideal or natural light source. Light sources with a high CRI are desirable in color-critical applications such as neonatal care, photography and cinematography.

As we tend to use it here, the ideal light source is considered to be incandescent. We recognize that there is some variation amongst incandescent lamps, but it is considered insignificant to the discussion.We use it here to measure how close a given LED comes to rendering colors compared to the Holy Incandescent. The big thing to remember is that CRI is not a measurement that stands alone. One LED with a CRI of 85 may at a neutral color temp may actually do a better job of rendering colors than another LED with a CRI of 92 at a warmer color temp. [I am not going to try to explain color temperature - Wikipedia does a great job, with examples.]

And now for bins. Incandescents emit light across most of the visible spectrum, with a bias towards the warmer color temperatures. LEDs, on the other hand, actually emit light in a narrower band, which may actually be part or all Ultraviolet. Manufacturers add phosphors that will take the actual emitted light as input, and glow at a different color temp as output, usually in the visible spectrum. The available phosphors that do this only emit light on a few bands, and not across the entire spectrum. The challenge is to blend these phosphors to give the best representation of full spectrum light, and thus a high CRI. For an example, go to the Cree website and look at a datasheet for one of the popular LEDs like the XM-L. Cree gives a great spectral response graph showing how this looks.

All of the manufacturers measure the total spectral output of their LEDs, and assign them to a bin that corresponds to their primary color balance. This a single LED like the XM-L can have up to a dozen or more bins, depending on how well the various phosphors blended on that particular emitter. Thus you will see bin names like XM-L S4 or T5 or U2. Each bin will have a unique color temp, efficiency, and lumen output at a reference current. It can get very confusing, but a good rule of thumb is the higher the letter the higher the relative color temp and lumen output, with the numbers being subsets within the group.

As always, anyone who knows better, please feel free to correct my feeble attempts at explanation.

Now I'm tired so I'm going to bed.
 

mattw

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So I emailed Malkoff about the M361N and he indicated that this emitter would have a very short runtime on 2 x CR123A's. I see that the current draw on the emitter is fairly hi, 1.450A and the OTF lumens are not that overly high, 375. He also says that more than 6.0V may destroy the module. 2xCR123A batteries would be around 6.5V? Am I missing something here, these appear to be designed for 18650's only.

Again, I am wanting to be able to run CR123A cells to avoid exposing my 18650's to 0F or lower in the winter, since I understand that may not be good for them at all. How short would short run time be on 2xCR123A's? Looking at the quality of these emitters, I would assume that the OTF numbers are real, not China numbers.

Thanks Matt
 
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Timothybil

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I may be wrong here, but I think what Gene was referring to with his greater than 6v comment was using two RCR123As or two 18360s in the light, which would give a max voltage of over 8v fresh of the charger. As it states on the web page, [FONT=verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif]'This dropin was designed for use with a single Li-ion protected rechargeable cell or two primary CR123A batteries', [/FONT]and[FONT=verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif] '[/FONT][FONT=verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif]The input voltage is 3.4 - 6 volts. Input voltages of more 6 volts may destroy this module.' [/FONT]You should have no problems running this drop in with two primary cells.
 

ChrisGarrett

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Although Panasonic CR123A come out of the pack at ~3.2v, yielding ~6.4v in tandem, they sag pretty quickly, so the fact that he mentions shorter runtimes on 2xCR123As, I'm going to say that they won't destroy the light, but email him again.

A Pannie CR123A has roughly 1450mAh of capacity at 1A and 1184mAh at 2A, on the sample HKJ tests in the link , so split the difference. You're looking at an hour and fifteen minutes, on high, for $5+ a pop?

http://lygte-info.dk/review/batteries2012/Panasonic Lithium Power CR123 UK.html

Chris
 

mattw

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I do not like the cost of 123's. But, from what I have read, if I do not prevent my 18650's from getting to cold they will be damaged. I keep one of the nylon light holsters on the seat belt of my truck, where it comes out of the column and does not interfere with the belt. I would never remember to bring it in every night.

Am I overly concerned about the cold?
 

ChrisGarrett

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I do not like the cost of 123's. But, from what I have read, if I do not prevent my 18650's from getting to cold they will be damaged. I keep one of the nylon light holsters on the seat belt of my truck, where it comes out of the column and does not interfere with the belt. I would never remember to bring it in every night.

Am I overly concerned about the cold?

You're better off with CR123A primaries for 0*F temps, so you need to bite the bullet when it comes to cost. Cold isn't great for any battery/cell, but they work pretty well at zero degrees.

Chris
 

Timothybil

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If you haven't already, check out the CR123A cells from Titanium Innovations. They ranked right at the bottom of the other first tier name cells in the last CR123A shoot-out done by our intrepid reviewers, and can usually be found for around a dollar and few, especially in quantity. I don't use CR123A primaries any more, so can't speak to them directly but the reviews look good. My in car light is an Icon Rouge 1 with an AA primary for the same reason you have.
 

Raze

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The Pelican Case CR123 from Battery Station is a good deal too. Malkoff uses Battery Station cells in their lights.
 
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