Pak-Lite 9v LED light - what do you think ?

JedSmith

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 8, 2014
Messages
85
Hi guys. I took an outdoor survival course about 4-5 years ago (before I became a flashaholic) & one of the items recommended is a device which snaps over a 9v rectangular type battery and has two LEDs. You could also get a simple elastic headband for it. I bought two Ultra model lights and two headbands. I put them in small outdoor survival kits that could be worn around the waist. (Looks like you can find out about these at 9voltlight (DOT) com)

Well the bag where I put the two small survival kits got thrown out/lost somehow. So I ended up also losing these two lights. I never replaced them, hoping I might find them later. If I recall, I paid about $70 for the two set-ups.

I would like your opinion on these lights (whether you've used one or not - but please tell me what your experience is with it). Do they seem to be worth the money, or are there better options out there in the market now ? This will be for an outdoor survival kit where bulk, weight, run time, durability/reliability, and shelf life is most important. This light would always be available, even if other lights were also carried. Thank you -
 
Last edited:

JedSmith

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 8, 2014
Messages
85
Thanks guys. The most recent thread I found in my search was from 2005. Not sure why I didn't come up with the ones you cited, but I appreciate your help. (Maybe I spelled it wrong.) Regards - - -
 

reppans

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 25, 2007
Messages
4,873
The PacLite is spec'd for 600 hours at what I measure to be ~0.5 lms (but unregulated). I've run my favorite 1xAA EDC on 1xAAAAs (from a 9V) at 60hrs at 0.3 lms (regulated) so that would be over 350 hrs from a full 9V. The AA light can also run AAAs, AAs, and anything between CR123s and 18650s (with a piece of tinfoil), and so I prefer its SHTF versatility, not to mention being a great EDC light :).

The 9V is an important cell though, during the Superstorm Sandy outage, the 9V was the only decent cell that remained widely available in stores.
 

JedSmith

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 8, 2014
Messages
85
Thanks reppans - I'm going to have to search your past posts to see if you might have taken photos using a piece of tinfoil to run your AA light on different type batteries. I recall you mentioning this capability before. :twothumbs

Unless I somehow find my two lost Pak-lites, I don't currently own a light which runs off a 9v battery. Though I have quite a few batteries, your last statement above is a good reason for me to get a light which runs off of them. Because of smoke alarms, theyre very common of course.
 

BIG45-70

Enlightened
Joined
Aug 28, 2010
Messages
353
I just ordered one last night, mainly to throw in my pack. I have plenty of lights that are super bright and throw like crazy but his will be the first one in own that's been tested to a year of continuous runtime.
 

TMedina

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 17, 2006
Messages
1,737
The 9V is an important cell though, during the Superstorm Sandy outage, the 9V was the only decent cell that remained widely available in stores.

I think this alone is a good reason to have one sitting in your emergency box.

And perhaps a good reason to start tinkering with a full-sized flashlight that runs on a 9v. Hmmmm. :D
 

herman30

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Messages
25
Location
Finland
This is my set-up. Allows me to hang it anywhere needed. Haven´t used it much but it is allways with me when away from home. Connected to a lithium battery. That way I can be sure to have it function even after several years. Bright enough to light up a room if a black-out should happen.

This is an emergency light so long burntime is preferred over brightness.
I have other flashlights to cover the brightness-aspect.

PS. For the love of god I cannot understand why my text is underlined! Because you really screwed up your image tags - Norm

q285.jpg
[/URL]
 
Last edited by a moderator:

JedSmith

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 8, 2014
Messages
85
Herman30 - I like your set-up. One thing nice about the Pak-Lite is that its so small that it fits in a compact emergency survival kit very easily. I admit to thinking "I paid How Much for this thing?" when I first got it, since there's not a lot there physically. But, of course, the point is to have a light anywhere needed that Will work even if its been sitting there for years. Yes, I'm just messing with you with this underlinging ! :naughty:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AVService

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 30, 2011
Messages
2,163
I got several of the Safe Lites last year and not the crazy banded model they sell in stores but nicely packaged models with belt clips and screw down battery compartments and magnets built-in for hanging. One version is even more of a Lantern than a spotlight which seems a handy design too.

They were cheap and I have had one run for about a year on low just to see if it really could,it can!

I too have a lot of lights and these are by no means a precision instrument but they do prove to have a big place in a BOB for me. A few Lithium batteries and I will have plenty of usable light for a long time when needed.
 

JedSmith

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 8, 2014
Messages
85
I got several of the Safe Lites last year and not the crazy banded model they sell in stores but nicely packaged models with belt clips and screw down battery compartments and magnets built-in for hanging. One version is even more of a Lantern than a spotlight which seems a handy design too.

They were cheap and I have had one run for about a year on low just to see if it really could,it can!

I too have a lot of lights and these are by no means a precision instrument but they do prove to have a big place in a BOB for me. A few Lithium batteries and I will have plenty of usable light for a long time when needed.

I checked out the Safe-Light after reading some of the threads that were kindly provided on this 9v light subject. Looks robust. Bigger in size than the Pak-Lite which may or may not be a disadvantage depending on your needs. Unfortunately, the fellow who makes/offers them is in the hospital now and isn't taking orders. I wanted to try one out.

Is this your light ?

http://www.safe-light.com/
 
Last edited:

Lynx_Arc

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 1, 2004
Messages
11,212
Location
Tulsa,OK
I can see the allure of these lights, I think the most often touted thing about them is the LONG runtime at a "dim" level". I don't however see for most people the cost effectiveness and usefulness of them I think often people let them sit on shelves stored away for this uber blackout that may happen when they could invest that money in lights using AAA/AA batteries that can be used all the time that also have low modes like firefly. You can use nimh and lithium AA/AAA batteries in these light and totally avoid the chance of alkalines leaking and messing up your light not having to even think about buying outrageously priced 9v lithium batteries for a light that you can only use as mostly a dim area light. A 9v alkaline costs from 2 to 5 dollars each while AA/AAA batteries can be got in bulk for as cheap at 30 cents each or 6-15 of them for the same price. The amount of available power in that many batteries/cost totally dwarfs a 9v battery in comparison and allows you to use lights with outputs of 200+ lumens instead of perhaps 20+ at which at that high of an output the 9v battery isn't going to last long at all.
I say to the folks who don't have a surplus stockpile of 9v batteries all the time to not be drawn in by runtimes at low low levels of these lights and consider other lights using a better choice of batteries.
 

JedSmith

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 8, 2014
Messages
85
LynxArc - I think you made some very good points.
To give a little a bit of additional background - I do lots of activity in the outdoors, including involvement with Search and Rescue. I first heard about the Pak-Lite in a week long outdoor survival/navigation course taught by a retired USAF survival instructor in Montana. One of the things stressed was to have an emergency survival kit on your person at all times when outdoors. Life threatening emergencies often start with the words "I was just gonna . . . " go for a short hike, look over that hill, check out the view, etc The advantage of the Pak-Lite is that it would take up very little space in such a small emergency kit and be ready to go when needed. (People don't carry kits that are too large and/or heavy.) In a outdoor situation where a full moon is the brightest source of general light & often there is only star light available, low level flashlights can be quite useful. The 9v light was to be a back-up, something that was part of that always carried emergency kit. The kit also has provisions for shelter, fire making, signaling, and other items needed to stay alive and to get you home. So, economy of space is a requirement.
But, its been 4-5 years since I took that wilderness survival course. I wasn't a flashaholic at the time. So, I wondered if there might be something out now that would better fill the needs for an outdoor emergency kit light, or do it for less money. I'm going to consider the points you mentioned when picking a kit light. Regards, - - -

P.S. - another requirement is easy one hand operation in case the other hand is injured. 'Easy' because when you're shaking from the cold and trying to make a fire, you don't want the task any more difficult, or take any more time than necessary.
 
Last edited:

nightshade

Enlightened
Joined
Mar 19, 2004
Messages
798
Location
Adrift
Currently, using two for basement night lights, one is using a spent 9V from my Fluke 287 and another using a spent cell from our AccuRite weather station. The 6AA to 9V adapter is a spin on the 9volt debate too.
 

TMedina

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 17, 2006
Messages
1,737
PS. For the love of god I cannot understand why my text is underlined!

I was about to tease you remorselessly. :D

It looks like the post is listed as a link - a quick fix is to highlight the text, copy it, delete the original text, then paste it as plain text.
 

TMedina

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 17, 2006
Messages
1,737
Lynx makes an excellent point about bulk batteries, but I am an admitted geardo. And the idea of having a light (or two) that will run on the only batteries available is just a neat idea. It makes my inner geardo all warm and fuzzy.

That said, I have enough CR123s and low-output/long-running modules that I'd probably never need a 9V light, but I also love the idea of having secondary or even tertiary options to explore, should push come to shove.

Heh. To be honest, I'd have to run out of all my CR123s, then my AAs, then my AAAs, and then worry about a 9V. But still...options! :thumbsup:
 

JedSmith

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Jan 8, 2014
Messages
85
Heh. To be honest, I'd have to run out of all my CR123s, then my AAs, then my AAAs, and then worry about a 9V. But still...options! :thumbsup:

TMedina - just imagine a TheEndofTheWorldasWeKnowIt scenario - maybe out of a movie. The power is out everywhere and everyone has exhausted their 'normal' sized batteries. But there is a zoom in on our movie hero who breaks into an abandoned home and goes to the smoke alarm. "What's he up to ?" the movie audience of non-flashaholics thinks. He pops out the alarm 9v battery and snaps his LED light head on top of it. Success - our hero will survive another night ! :twothumbs
 

TMedina

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 17, 2006
Messages
1,737
Ha! While awesome, in a TEOTWAWKI scenario, I freely admit I don't have the ruthless drive to survive required. I'm more likely to be that guy drinking a toast to the oncoming tidal wave. :D

That said, I was speculating about 9V lights - this thread mentioned the pak-lites, and someone else mentioned safe-lights, and the thought occurs that my Malkoff drop-ins can run up to 9Vs...then I did a key word search on Amazon for "9V flashlight".

Wow, it looks like I wasn't the only person to think about 9V-powered flashlights. Looks like I get to buy some new toys to experiment with. :D
 
Top