Pandemic supply chain in your area

Hooked on Fenix

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In California, we’re one step ahead of recycling your pee. They legalized human composting. You can now recycle yourself as compost to leave behind something for the next generation, of trees. We’re just a step away from Soylent Green.
 

bykfixer

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I mentioned this earlier in the thread half-jokingly but it looks like it will become reality:


There's a new alternative to fertilizers that could transform the world of agriculture: human urine. It sounds gross and almost unbelievable, but the multitude of money-saving and environmental perks of "peecycling" are too massive to ignore.
Molorganite fertilizer is used on slopes after fires. It began as golf course fertilizer in the early 20th century. It's waste from humans.

Pig feces is used in asphalts these days....
 

turbodog

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I mentioned this earlier in the thread half-jokingly but it looks like it will become reality:


There's a new alternative to fertilizers that could transform the world of agriculture: human urine. It sounds gross and almost unbelievable, but the multitude of money-saving and environmental perks of "peecycling" are too massive to ignore.

The labor/cost/etc required to aggregate/process sufficient quantities relegate this as a science experiment.
 

jtr1962

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The labor/cost/etc required to aggregate/process sufficient quantities relegate this as a science experiment.
It's obviously not yet in the mass implementation stage. The fact it's even being discussed is a bit of a surprise since I didn't think the idea was even feasible enough to merit serious consideration.
 

turbodog

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It's obviously not yet in the mass implementation stage. The fact it's even being discussed is a bit of a surprise since I didn't think the idea was even feasible enough to merit serious consideration.

Economically, no. Technologically... not surprised in the least, because as every country person knows...

1664930050402.png
 

bykfixer

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My grocery bill has literally doubled this year. Supply is plentiful, but part of that is stuff is just sitting on the shelf collecting dust.
 

Hooked on Fenix

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Some people just see all these high prices and write a song about it. Helps keep things a bit less painful when you can keep your sense of humor during the hard times.

 

mickb

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I work in international logistics and supply chains.

The pandemic effect on the supply chain was a rort. They parked the worlds fleets up, the sea containers( 20 and 40ft , which most consumables in your life are shipped in) meant to be at sea 50% of the time, now needed land storage. So the big companies instead....scrapped them. Thats right. The smaller fleets became insolvent and were bought out, the port authorities and companies in the world got on board and increased berthing fees through the roof (I am talking hundreds of % here) further hammering smaller operators.
The big companies having broken every anti-monopolisation law we have invented the last 100 years, started making containers again, now having desperate markets , and then started breaking every global price gouging law we have. 12 months into the pandemic container shipping costs had gone from about $800 between two countries to $8000.

These costs were finally passed onto you which is part of the reason everything from textiles( clothing), silicon components, metals, raw materials, industrial chemicals, meat, food ingredients all began jumping in price about 5-10% per quarter into 2021.

About 1 year after this Putin invaded the Ukraine and was blamed for all this inflation. If he is resonsible he truly is dangerous because evidently the guy is in possession of a time travelling machine with a range of at least minus 1 year.

Effecting mass sector prices jumps before invading anywhere is no mean feat even with his time machine. Not sure if even Lex Luthor could pull that off? maybe Thanos could though but only with the infinity gauntlet.
 

turbodog

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I work in international logistics and supply chains.

The pandemic effect on the supply chain was a rort. They parked the worlds fleets up, the sea containers( 20 and 40ft , which most consumables in your life are shipped in) meant to be at sea 50% of the time, now needed land storage. So the big companies instead....scrapped them. Thats right. The smaller fleets became insolvent and were bought out, the port authorities and companies in the world got on board and increased berthing fees through the roof (I am talking hundreds of % here) further hammering smaller operators.
The big companies having broken every anti-monopolisation law we have invented the last 100 years, started making containers again, now having desperate markets , and then started breaking every global price gouging law we have. 12 months into the pandemic container shipping costs had gone from about $800 between two countries to $8000.

These costs were finally passed onto you which is part of the reason everything from textiles( clothing), silicon components, metals, raw materials, industrial chemicals, meat, food ingredients all began jumping in price about 5-10% per quarter into 2021.

About 1 year after this Putin invaded the Ukraine and was blamed for all this inflation. If he is resonsible he truly is dangerous because evidently the guy is in possession of a time travelling machine with a range of at least minus 1 year.

Effecting mass sector prices jumps before invading anywhere is no mean feat even with his time machine. Not sure if even Lex Luthor could pull that off? maybe Thanos could though but only with the infinity gauntlet.

I've noticed that trans oceanic container freight prices are significantly down from their peak and still falling.
 

aznsx

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This should help with our 'supply chain' issues. Yes, it certainly is more than just about a 'pandemic'. There's an epidemic of stupidity fueling this 'issue' too:

 

Hooked on Fenix

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This should help with our 'supply chain' issues. Yes, it certainly is more than just about a 'pandemic'. There's an epidemic of stupidity fueling this 'issue' too:

If you think that’s bad, wait until January. California has a law on the books that takes effect in January 2023 that makes it so all semi trucks must be 2010 or newer (must take diesel exhaust fluid, which is in short supply) to operate in the state. This includes trucks coming from out of state. Could be a loss of close to 75,000+ trucks in state plus many out of state trucks will be banned from coming into California to pick up the slack from the sudden loss of distribution. If you think you don’t live in California so this doesn’t effect you, remember that this will put a major bottleneck at the ports and prevent other states from getting their goods too. It restricts all trucks before 2010 from coming into the state. All states will have to follow California’s stupid law to pass through to get their goods.
 

turbodog

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This should help with our 'supply chain' issues. Yes, it certainly is more than just about a 'pandemic'. There's an epidemic of stupidity fueling this 'issue' too:


Is that net loss or scaremongering by ignoring new hires? And what fraction of that labor segment does 11k people represent?
 

orbital

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scaremongering is big business, basically because most people are easily told what to think

the manipulation of sentiment
 

aznsx

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Is that net loss or scaremongering by ignoring new hires? And what fraction of that labor segment does 11k people represent?

Good questions, and I don't know the labor side of the equation at all, but was rather entirely focused (personally) on the big screen grab on that page from the broadcast storyline "Diesel Prices Impacting Trucking Companies", and the link below it "Rapid Rise in Diesel Prices Squeezing Truckers". Nobody has to explain that when fuel goes up significantly, trucking is significantly (negatively) affected. How that translates to changes in their staffing, I have no idea, but I'll go out on a limb and conclude that staffing can't go up.

Now back to my intended (although not explicitly conveyed) point, which is that the drastic increase in diesel (and gasoline) costs in recent times most likely should not have and didn't need to happen, and the aforementioned 'stupidity' is attributed to those whose actions have contributed to that (probably) unnecessary rise in fuel costs. I'm not naming names. It doesn't matter at this point. It's history. I'll just talk about my fuel costs for now, since I just filled my tank and was pretty unhappy (and won't even say with whom):)
 

Hooked on Fenix

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What is causing a lot of truckers to quit is they literally are losing money working. If you had to pay to work instead of making money, you’d quit too. A lot of the truck drivers spend long hours waiting at ports to pick up and drop off loads. Sometimes they wait with their engines idling for 8-10 hours. Since they usually get paid based on mileage, they often don’t get paid for a full day of work while using expensive diesel fuel. Before the supply chain crisis, they could absorb some time waiting for loads without it cutting into their pocketbooks much, but not a whole day. They need to redo the way they pay truckers to include time waiting for loads (pay them all hourly), or soon we won’t have many truckers left.
 

aznsx

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scaremongering is big business, basically because most people are easily told what to think

the manipulation of sentiment
Yeah, there's both fear mongering, and cheer mongering that goes on. If you ask me, I think there's just way too much 'mongering' in general, from all the mongerers!
 

mickb

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I've noticed that trans oceanic container freight prices are significantly down from their peak and still falling.
They shouldnt have peaked at all being the point. And the issue is the cargo price is still climbing, aka the industrial raw materials, components and consumer goods contributing to your lifestyle and mine.
 
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turbodog

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They shouldnt have peaked at all being the point. And the issue is the cargo price is still climbing, aka the industrial raw materials, components and consumer goods contributing to your lifestyle and mine.
Care to explain how any business, freight or otherwise, delivers the same quantity of output despite having less labor to work with due to a pandemic...

The workers that are well work overtime, which costs more. Ordering online spiked greatly, which exacerbated the issue as supply chains placed large orders in an effort to raise stock levels.

Most businesses operate at close to peak output levels... it's efficient. Does not take much of a disruption on ANY of the needed inputs to wreck the process, and c-19's effects touched everything: energy, raw materials, labor, etc.

This little adventure exposed systemic weaknesses, bottlenecks, and plenty of areas for arbitrage.


1665263529418.png
 

mickb

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Care to explain how any business, freight or otherwise, delivers the same quantity of output despite having less labor to work with due to a pandemic...

Care to explain how any business sector jumps 900 % in inflation with the same labour issues when the majority of others dont? ;

Did you find the postal service in your country went to $50 to post a letter, did domestic shipping/transport/rail jump 9x over. Did manufacture jump this amount? Did you start buying flashlights for $1000 with $300 shipping because nitecore and UPS had 'less labor to work with"


This little adventure exposed systemic weaknesses, bottlenecks, and plenty of areas for arbitrage.
What it failed to exposed is Price gouging, market manipulation and about every anti-monopolisation skullduggery across a specific sector.

And for which costs are still 200% too high, thanks to all the small players pushed out of the market.


View attachment 33103

Now show me the graph for raw materials, textiles, FMCG dropping in the same way. Id love to see that, so would my family.

I agree there are a lot of things going on in the world yes, not to mention the bungled sanctions against putin. Trade sanctions are meant to be weaponised economics directed at one country. These ones appear to be doing more damage to world economy . Maybe someone needs to send the guys at the UN and NATO a pocket calculator to help with the math here. lol.

But the laws broken during the pandemic, particularly the ones designed to protect markets during vulnerable times, were unnacceptable and unbelievable.

I guarantee none of the supply fat cats , major distributors, big 4 shippers or super-retailers are taking a hit over it either. Maybe we need a graph of Jeff Bezos net worth for the last 3 years? ;)
 
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