Pandemic supply chain in your area

fredx

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I dont understand the baby formula need- I think it way blown out of proportion
I had no baby formula 63 yrs ago when I was an infant
 

pnwoutdoors

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I dont understand the baby formula need- I think it way blown out of proportion
I had no baby formula 63 yrs ago when I was an infant

Of course, many mothers simply cannot (for whatever reason) produce enough milk for an infant up through weaning. I'm sure much of that inability has to do with the lovely modern chemical witches' brew we put into the environment, water, almost all foods, etc. Plus, the population's more than 2x what it was nearly 70yrs ago, thus even more such need, even if the incidence occurred at the same rate. Nix a manufacturing plant or two, and ... shazam!, deficit.

Irrespective of why, though, that leaves surrogates or "formula." Not many choices for a mother without milk. A serious issue, with a supply chain as small as the "formula" supply, if it gets hit with anything.
 

fredx

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I just think its over blown and its a crutch that women / mothers / public think they gotta have it and have been brainwashed-- sure, some will do better with it.
 

idleprocess

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I dont understand the baby formula need- I think it way blown out of proportion
I had no baby formula 63 yrs ago when I was an infant
The present socioeconomic situation is rather different than it was 63 years ago such that not all mothers are afforded the opportunity to breastfeed their infants.
 

fredx

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The present socioeconomic situation is rather different than it was 63 years ago such that not all mothers are afforded the opportunity to breastfeed their infants.
I have to respectfully disagree with that statement as a whole- we all have choice to make, problem is the vast majority of americans dont feel they should have to own up / deal with the consequences of the bad choices / decisions.
 

idleprocess

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I have to respectfully disagree with that statement as a whole- we all have choice to make, problem is the vast majority of americans dont feel they should have to own up / deal with the consequences of the bad choices / decisions.
Do tell how the cost of living vastly outpacing the growth of wages effectively mandating that an ever-increasing percentage of both parents in a traditional nuclear family work - many of which have neither family leave policies nor the possibility for mothers to pump and store milk during working hours - is a matter of individual choices.
 

fredx

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Do tell how the cost of living vastly outpacing the growth of wages effectively mandating that an ever-increasing percentage of both parents in a traditional nuclear family work - many of which have neither family leave policies nor the possibility for mothers to pump and store milk during working hours - is a matter of individual choices.
Got to disagree with you there again
Marriage is a choice
Kids are a choice
Both parents working is a choice
 

idleprocess

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Got to disagree with you there again
You've certainly got opinions. Reasoning to back them less so.

Marriage is a choice
Indeed it is - and severed far more easily now than in the past, generally to the detriment of mothers and children.

Kids are a choice
In the micro sense, yes, however such is the power of the desire to engage in the act of chromosome swapping - without the intent to consummate it - that no small percentage of children start out as accidents.

In the macro sense over the long term society shrinks without them, typically impoverishing itself along the way.

Both parents working is a choice
This is an option for a steadily-dwindling slice of the populace if they wish to provide a good life for themselves and their children.
 
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It seems you two got yerselves off on a tangent. Nevertheless, I'll follow. My Better 3/4s and I were married 38 years ago. We purchased a moderate house located on an acre of property for the grand sum of $75,000. Today our home is valued at around $431,000. The point being, a young couple today will be impossible-pressed to find an affordable home for most one income families.

Women staying home to start a family was much more of a choice 38 years ago. Today, not so much.
 

fredx

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Expect many flashmob performances of Texans on Ice™ - universally panned by critics - tomorrow across the region.
I just saw that on the NBC news- Fort Worth is looking pretty bad- stay safe-- hope you dont need to go out in that mess tomorrow

On a brighter note-- rumors are the the ground hog is gonna predict an early and warmer spring
 

idleprocess

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I just saw that on the NBC news- Fort Worth is looking pretty bad- stay safe-- hope you dont need to go out in that mess tomorrow

On a brighter note-- rumors are the the ground hog is gonna predict an early and warmer spring
Thanks. I've been working from home for going on 3 years now and have the provisions to sit in place for many days while other residents are engaged in the usual trope of looting stores of their stocks of milk, bread, bottled water.
 

turbodog

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... 38 years ago. We purchased a moderate house located on an acre of property for the grand sum of $75,000. Today our home is valued at around $431,000. The point being, a young couple today will be impossible-pressed to find an affordable home for most one income families.
...

You owe it to include at least some napkin math... 38 years on 75k is roughly equivalent to 300k today. And current mortages are 1) easier to get with 2) lower rates than in the past... so best guess is that, as a percent of income, the overall outflow is very similar to 38 years ago.

Worth noting that married individuals who are sole earners tend to receive a premium over their unmarried co-workers. The reasons for this are a topic for another thread.
 

bykfixer

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One thing that has changed from the past is the daily stuff we now consider normal has a long list that in the past were considered luxuries. A tv in each room, computers, smart devices like phones, pay for services, dining out, a microwave and air fryer, pizza delivery, prepared foods, year round climate controlled homes, at least two cars, and a bunch of other stuff we freaked out about during the pandemic shortages. We mostly speak of food and toilet paper in this thread but there was a point where coffee makers new cars were also in short supply.

When the pandemic hit full on, close stuff down mode one of my coworkers said he was going to get fat because the gym had been forced to close. When many restaraunts closed he went into full panic mode because he only knew how to make sandwiches. And when the toilet paper shortage hit?..... now he constantly complained how he wasn't making enough money and since his wife had quit her job.....

It just showed me how a generation after mine had no clue that all those luxeries weren't necessities. And my boss was looking all shaggy because the barber shop had closed. Me? I haven't paid for a haircut since Reagan was President.
 

pnwoutdoors

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I have to respectfully disagree with that statement as a whole- we all have choice to make, problem is the vast majority of americans dont feel they should have to own up / deal with the consequences of the bad choices / decisions.

Simple question, then: if a mother fails to lactate and has zero milk for an infant, what are that mother's options?

Some people might well be mesmerized by the modern miracle of supermarket products. But those who have actual lactation problems are a different group, one that has few options.
 

fredx

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Simple question, then: if a mother fails to lactate and has zero milk for an infant, what are that mother's options?
I never said all anywhere in any of my posts-there are always exceptions, but today 99% of mothers are brainwashed that they have to have it-- and they dont.
So who has the statistics that all of these mothers using it dont lactate? Bet the number is micro-scopic.

I dont believe prior to this baby formula "scam" that babys were dying by the scads because their mothers didnt produce milk.

If they dont-- then of course they need it- or if they have multiple births, of course they need it
 

orbital

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What we call problems today,, are really not problems.
Imagine 200 years ago in a rural or frontier area; you grew or ate whatever you could or else died trying to stay warm.

Todays 'issues' are mostly internet or news generated, people cannot comprehend having it hard.
 
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