Paracord

Stress_Test

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I did some google and youtube searching and there's almost nothing out there as far as people testing or demonstrating the stuff (not that I saw anyway).

Granted, if it really does fail at over 2000 lbs, it's probably not a good idea to backyard-test this stuff. That's a LOT of force to let go suddenly.

I'm hoping I might be able to test it at work, but things have been kinda crazy lately (like everything) so I don't know.
 

adamlau

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Tough-Grid #750 is nice. Slightly stiffer than 550, passes through most 550 accessories (e.g. ITW GTSP CordLoc) as well. Have about 1K feet of the stuff. Though the outer sheath is no more durable than any other quality 550...
 

Hooked on Fenix

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I did some google and youtube searching and there's almost nothing out there as far as people testing or demonstrating the stuff (not that I saw anyway).

Granted, if it really does fail at over 2000 lbs, it's probably not a good idea to backyard-test this stuff. That's a LOT of force to let go suddenly.

I'm hoping I might be able to test it at work, but things have been kinda crazy lately (like everything) so I don't know.

Battle cord is static, as in it doesn't stretch. If you let go of one end under load, it's less likely to spring out and hurt someone like dynamic stretchy rope. However, it's important to know it's limitations. If you take a fall on it climbing, you will stop suddenly, taking the full force of the fall (as opposed to dynamic rope that gives a softer catch), and may stress your anchor to the point of failure at which point you would fall. Don't use it for climbing. It's okay for limited rappelling doubled up. You have to be aware of how little friction you'll get through a belay device and how hard it is to grip due to the thin diameter. Be aware that if you tie it to something, it's strong enough that it may not be the first thing that breaks or falls down. Safe working load is 10% of break strength or 265 lbs. Doubled up break strength is 5,300 lbs. before loss from knots. That makes it strong enough to be rated for climbing doubled up, but it isn't rated as a lifeline. Use your best judgment for it's applications and try not to do anything stupid.
 

ghostguy6

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Do not use Battlecord for rappelling. There is some sheath slippage when you apply fiction. In the photo I was lowering a 140# load off a 3rd story building using a munter hitch. You can see a noticeable bulging effect. If you were to use enough weight or a friction plate similar to an ATC it could cause a jam in your device leaving you stuck.

battlecord.jpg
 

Stress_Test

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Reading reviews and stuff about paracord and other generic rope, I'm always amazed at how many people want to use the stuff for rappelling/climbing. Even if the manufacturer's info states "not for climbing" the comments are full of people saying "can I use this to rappel?"

In my view, if I'm gonna do something silly like dangle over a cliff on a rope, I want that rope to be strong enough to lift a Chevy Suburban, and be produced by an actual mountaineering company that does all the necessary Q.A. production steps.

I mean, climbing rope is expensive, I get it, but it's still a lot cheaper than a hospital visit. Or a funeral!
 

Stress_Test

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Whelp, I got the Battlecord in today. The neon orange color is nice and bright. In some brands the "neon" orange is more just plain orange. I did notice on the paper wrapping it stated the working load of 265 lbs, and not just the tensile load. So kudos to Atwood for including both numbers, and putting a big whopping safety factor on there (10).

As has been said, it's really really stiff. It made me think of when you're weed-whacking or something and have two long extension cords, and you tie a loose square knot between the cords so the plugs don't pull apart. That's about the stiffness level.

Tying knots is kind of a pain because you really have to cinch everything down and pull it tight so it doesn't just open itself back up. I think this stuff would probably work best for securing larger objects, like on the back of a flatbed truck or trailer. Wouldn't work too well for trying to lash a water bottle to your backpack or other small jobs like that.

I'd say this would be something good to keep in the car or truck maybe, or for other specific applications, but for general use cord I'd still stick with the 550 or 750 paracord for my bag or coat pocket.

If I'm able to do some actual testing on this stuff, I'll start a new thread.


P.S. If you need more strength the paracord but still need something fairly flexible, you might look at nylon "accessory cord" that climbers use, in the 7mm style. (I've tried 8mm but it's bulkier and stiffer, so 7 seems the happy medium)

I've bought a couple of hanks of this BlueWater stuff: https://www.bluewaterropes.com/product/7mm-accessory-cord/
 

Hooked on Fenix

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I did say not to climb (ascend) with battle cord. For rappelling, I said it's good for limited rappelling. I meant body belay rappelling and possibly figure 8 type rappel devices that let you add additional friction with more wraps like a Sterling ATS and only on two strands to match minimal climb spec standards for rope (22 kN or 5000 lbs.). I would not use an ATC type device as pinching the cord could cause rope slippage. I would not use a Munter hitch for the same reason and you may not get enough friction. Don't try the rappel with an autoblock or using a prussuck to ascend either. The cord would have to be so thin, it wouldn't be strong enough to do any good. For any climbing type application, if you don't know what you're doing, you shouldn't be climbing anyway. For knot tying, end to end, try a double or triple fisherman's knot. For one loop on the end, a figure eight on a bight with a stopper knot backing it up (half of a double fisherman's knot) works well.
 

adamlau

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As it relates to torches, we keep our use of paracord simple: Most receive a lanyard with either an alpine butterfly (looped over clips) or a folded constrictor (looped over body). Pop barrels for breakaway safety. Else, a triple constrictor terminated with pop barrels in deference to the Thyrm Switchback. This helps to increase stability with front-heavy, short-bodied lights.

img1.jpg
 

Hooked on Fenix

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is there any easy to learn very easy wewves that will aloww the most paracord for mt braclets

Millipede weave. Need to use a larger buckle (larger than 3/8 inch),a shackle or (fire steel) toggle for it to work. I use a tarp clip to keep the one side even instead of a jig. You get about 13 or 14 feet in one bracelet that rapidly deploys in a second. There are some good instructional videos on YouTube for this weave. I like to use parapocalypse cord for these bracelets to make them count (7 nylon strands, waxed jute twine, 10 lb. fishing line, spectra strand, Kevlar strand).
 

Stress_Test

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So, a YouTube guy went and tested some Battlecord.... sort of. He pull tested a homemade quickdraw that apparently some climbers had rigged up "out in the wild". The cord was used between two carabiners.

(this starts at the actual test; there's a bunch of other stuff in the vid)
video link

This guy (channel HowNOTtoHIGHLINE) has a huge number of break-test videos. Even though I'm not a climber I still found it super interesting to see what the various setups break at and how they break.
 
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